War Memorials - Surnames G

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GABRIEL, Stewart Arkcoll (New 27/06/2010)
GALYER, Fred (a.k.a. James), (Updated 18/09/2010)
GARDINER, William Norman (Updated 27/06/2014)
GARMAN, Percy
GASKELL, David Lyndsay Stranack, (Updated 04/06/2013)
GAUNT, George (Updated 22/08/2010)
GIRLING, Charles Norman (New 21/05/2014)
GLADMAN, John (Updated 20/11/2014)
GLOVER, Albert Edward (Updated 04/02/2009)
GOBEY, F (Updated 26/06/2014)
GOBLE, Archer Edward (New 04/07/2012)
GODDEN, Edward William (Updated 02/02/2009)
GOODSHIP, Charles Daniel
GOODSHIP, Sydney William (Updated 18/06/2010)
GOREY, Fred (Revised 07/08/2014)
GOREY, Henry (Revised 07/08/2014)
GRELLIER, Gordon Harley (Updated 24/12/2012)
GRINTER, George Henry (New 21/05/2014)
GRUCHY, J.E.A (New 01/02/2009)
GRUNDTVIG, Humphrey Halgrim (Revised 09/04/2013)
GUYTON, Albert James (Revised 03/08/2011)
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GABRIEL Stewart Arkcoll, Gunner. 139088.

76th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.
Died of Wounds 21 August 1917, aged 39.

Stewart Gabriel
Stewart Gabriel
Image source: de Ruvigny's Roll of Honour.

Stewart Arkcoll Gabriel was born in Streatham on 14 June 1878 (GRO reference: Sep 1878 Wandsworth 1d 709) to Joseph Sutcliffe and Susan Gabriel (nee Arkcoll). They married in 1867 at Maidstone.

In the 1881 census the family lived at 'Rokeby', Leigham Court Road, Streatham. Stewart's father was a 38 year old stone merchant and contractor. His mother was 37 and he had 7 siblings, Ruth aged 12, Joseph aged 9, Florence aged 7, Elsie aged 6, Gertrude aged 4 and Henry aged 1. Another sibling, Mary born 1872 is not shown on the census. This must have been quite a wealthy family as they were able to employ eight servants.

By 1891 Stewart was a 12 year old pupil at Godwynhurst College, Dover Road. The family were still living at 'Rokeby' in Streatham, and another sibling had arrived, Maud aged 9.

In 1901 the family were still 'Rokeby House' Streatham, but now Stewart was working in his father's office.

Stewart married Elsie Dorothy Thornton at Forest Gate on 2 June 1906. They lived at 'Moordale', Langley Bottom. They had one child, a daughter, Judith Ashley, born 11 July 1913.

In the 1911 census Stewart and his wife Dorothy were staying with his 67 year old mother Susan at 70, Margaret Street, W, no others having been recorded as living there. Of Stewart's 8 siblings only 5 survived by 1911.

The Surrey Recruitment Register shows that Stewart originally attested at Kingston on 15 March 1915, into the 'ASC (Yeoman)'. He was 38 years old, 5 feet 9 inches tall, weighed 148lbs, and had a chest measurement of 37 inches with an expansion of 5 inches. He lived at Moordale, Langley Bottom, and stated his occupation as dog breeder.

He originally attested into the 'Remount Squadron ASC', and he was sent to Woolwich. This did not please Stewart at all, and on 23 March 1915 he wrote complaining that he had volunteered for home service only, he knew nothing about horses, had been a shipping clerk, and should be similarly employed in the Army. Previous to this he had been examined by an Ophthalmic Surgeon who wrote the following:
This man complains of defective vision and when asked to read the test type his eyesight does not come up to standard, but by applying correcting glasses and then neutralising them again his statements can be found to be false. Although he has astigmatism in both eyes, worst in the left one. I am of the opinion that his eyesight is quite good enough for him to continue as he is, without glasses.
Despite this Stewart was duly discharged on 23 March 1915 under King's Regulations 392 iii (b), which read:
Not being likely to become an efficient soldier: Recruit passed by medical officer, but rejected by a recruiting officer stationed away from headquarters of the recruiting area, or by approving officer.
So despite being passed as fit by a medical officer, he was nonetheless rejected by the unit he was sent to. Possibly his complaining about not wanting to work with horses, coupled with the fact that he did not have perfect vision, and that he was quite old for the Army, led to his discharge. This was early in the war, recruits were still coming forward to volunteer, and the carnage was small compared to later years in the war. Before too long though, the Army was not at all fussy about who it recruited.

Despite having been once rejected, Stewart was accepted for service in November 1916, no doubt conscripted this time. De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour has the following entry:
GABRIEL, STEWART ARKCOLL, Gunner, No. 11818, R.G.A., s. of the late Joseph Sutcliffe Gabriel, of Streatham, by his wife, Susan, dau. of Charles Arkcoll, of Maidstone; b. Streatham, 14 June 1878; educ. Godwynhurst, Dover; on the outbreak of war endeavoured to enlist, but his services were refused on account of defective eyesight. He was accepted in Nov. 1916; underwent training at Bostall Heath and Winchester; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from April 1917; was slightly wounded in the groin but rejoined his regiment on recovery, and died from wounds on 21 Aug. 1917, received from aircraft bombs, while recovering from gassing, in a Field Clearing Station at Poperinghe. Buried in Dozinghem Soldiers' Cemetery. He m. at Forest Gate, co. Essex, 2 June, 1906, Elsie Dorothy, dau. Of William Thornton, late of Brighton, and had a dau., Judith Ashley, b. 11 July 1913.
Stewart's death was reported in the Epsom Advertiser dated 31 August 1917:
DIED FOR THE COUNTRY. - A gallant soldier, Gunner Stewart Arkcoll Gabriel, R.G.A., of Moordale, Epsom Downs, has given his life for the country. Gunner Gabriel is reported died from wounds on August 21st. He was 39 years old.
The soldiers died CD shows him as having formerly served as No. 11818 Middlesex Regiment, but his medal card has No. 139088, RGA. He was awarded the British War medal and the Victory medal.

Stewart's Medal Card
Stewart's medal card.
Image courtesy of Ancestry.co.uk (Link opens in a new window)
Ancestry Logo

The St Martin's Church Roll of Honour states that "STEWART ARKCOLL GABRIEL, was killed by an enemy bomb while lying gassed in a Casualty Clearing Station at Poperinghe on 21st August 1917."

Stewart's headstone in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.
Stewart's headstone in Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2010

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GALYER Fred Mason (a.k.a. James), Private. 8130 & 14233.

4th (Queens Own) Hussars.
Died of Wounds 7 June 1917, aged 26.

Fred's Headstone in Tincourt new cemetery
Fred's Headstone in Tincourt new cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2010

Fred Mason Galyer was born in 1891 (GRO reference: Jun 1891 Epsom 2a 2), the third son of Henry Robert and Eliza Galyer (nee Mason). His parents had married on 22 January 1882.

Henry (1856-1934) and Eliza (1856-1938) had nine children, all of whom had their mother's maiden name 'Mason' as a middle name:

NAME DATES OF BIRTH/DEATH PLACE OF BIRTH/DEATH
Annie Mason September quarter 1882 Carshalton, Surrey
Eliza Mason 9 September 1883 - 16 April 1969 Carshalton, Surrey
John Mason March quarter 1885 - 4 February 1964 Carshalton/Belmont, Surrey
Alice Mason September quarter 1886 - Carshalton, Surrey
Henry Mason 25 April 1888 - 4 February 1964 Carshalton/Belmont, Surrey
Lillie Mason September quarter 1889 - Carshalton, Surrey
Fred Mason June quarter 1891 - 7 June 1917 Carshalton/France
William Mason December quarter 1894 - 1894 Carshalton, Surrey
Florence Mason September 1896 - 1986 Carshalton, Surrey/Eastbourne, Sussex

Fred was born in the June quarter of 1891 shortly after the 1891 census was taken. It is unlikely that a heavily pregnant woman would be far from home, but the family's whereabouts has not been found in the 1891 census. They were probably living in one of the 'Mason's Cottages' in St James Road, Carshalton, as according to a family tree, Eliza Mason Galyer had been born there in 1883, and the family was living at 4, Mason's Cottages when the 1901 census was taken.

In 1901 Fred's father Henry, aged 45, was working as a railway engine driver to support his 45 year old wife Eliza and children, Eliza aged 17, John aged 16 (working as a gardener's boy), Henry aged 13 (who also served in the war), Lillie aged 12 Fred aged 10 and Florence aged 5. Fred's sister Annie was working away from home as a servant, as was his other sister Alice (transcribed as Jallier).

When the family moved to Epsom is unknown, but the family lived at 58, Albert Road when the 1911 census was taken. Fred's father was still earning his living driving engines, whilst Fred himself was a 20 year old general labourer. Fred's mother stated that she had given birth to nine children and that eight were still living. The family had a visitor with them on census night, seven year old Esther Marion Sumner from Folkestone.

Fred first attested, at the age of 19 years and 10 months, into the 4th Hussars, at Kingston, on 3 January 1912, and for whatever reason used the name James Galyer instead of his given name of Fred Mason Galyer, and was allocated the service number 8130. He was 5 feet 5¼ inches tall, weighed 128lbs, and had a chest measurement of 35½ inches with an expansion of 2½ inches. He had a fresh complexion, blue eyes, brown hair, and had scars on his right thumb and the back of his right hand. His pulse rate was 85, his vision 6/6 in each eye, and his religion was Church of England. He said he earned his living as a stableman, and provided the address of C. Cropley, builder, 1, Laburnum Road, Epsom. Presumably his employer, used horses for transport. He gave his next of kin as his father Robert, mother Eliza and sister Florrie, all of 58 Albert Road, Epsom.

Although he was classed as being of good physical development, he was twice hospitalised, the first on 27 March 1912 for 6 days with infected tonsils, and then on 14 April 1913 for 6 days with appendicitis. Three days after attesting on 6 January 1912 he was sent to Dublin, where on 6 February 1912 he gained his 3rd class education certificate. On 4 April he was sent to Curragh, County Kildare (an area well known for horse breeding and training), about 25 miles south west of Dublin. For reasons unknown, after 1 year and 109 days he paid £18, and was discharged from the Army, on 21 April 1913.

This however was not the end of his Army career, for soon after the outbreak of war, on 13 August 1914 he attested again at Kingston, and once again joined the 4th Hussars. He was given a new service number, 14233, and went to France with the Hussars on 23 November 1914. From his surviving service papers, it appears that he was refunded £8 from the £18 he had paid previously to be discharged!

Once the front lines had settled into the stalemate of trench warfare, the cavalry were held in readiness to exploit the 'gap' in the enemy lines that it was always hoped that the infantry would provide as a result of one of the many assaults launched throughout the war. When it became apparent that no such breakthrough was likely, the Hussars were used as labour and to hold the line. This is what they were doing on 7 June 1917 when James was killed in action, probably by shellfire or sniping. By Great War standards the 4th Hussars suffered very few fatalities in France & Flanders, loosing only 6 men throughout the whole of 1917, and only 75 throughout the entire war.

Fred is buried in plot X.B.21, Tincourt New British cemetery, five miles east of Peronne. Tincourt was a centre for Causality Clearing Stations, the cemetery first being used in June 1917. After the war, the bodies of many men were exhumed and buried here from many outlying small cemeteries.

The St Martin's church Roll of Honour states that "FRED MASOM (sic) GALYER, died of wounds in France on the 7th June 1917".

Fred was awarded the 1914-1915 Star, British War medal and the Victory medal.

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GARDINER William Norman, Lieutenant.

Royal Navy. H.M.S.Defence.
Killed in Action 31 May 1916, aged 23.

William's inscription on the Plymouth Naval Memorial
William's inscription on the Plymouth Naval Memorial
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2014

William Norman Gardiner was born on 1 February 1893 (GRO Reference: Mar 1893 Epsom 2a 21), the eldest of four sons of Edward and Hilda Gardiner (nee Cornish-Bowden). Their maternal grandfather was Rear Admiral William Bowden (1826-1896).

William's father Edward (MA Oxford) was from Buckinghamshire and was working as an assistant master at the Royal Medical Benevolent College (Epsom College) in 1891, shortly before marrying William's mother Hilda on 20 April1892 in her hometown of Newton Abbott Devon.

William was baptised in St Martin's church Epsom on 21 February 1893. Three years later his brother Athelstan Norman was born on 20 August 1896. Athelstan was destined to die in the Second World War when, as a Lieutenant Commander, his aircraft carrier HMS Hermes was sunk by Japanese aircraft off Ceylon. His next brother Robert Norman was born on 17 February 1900, and finally, eight years later his youngest brother Edward Ambrose Norman, was born on 23 February 1904.

As a Royal Medical Benevolent College master with a young family, Edward had the services of three servants when the 1901 census was taken; Ethel Louise Walker a nurse, Edith Beatrice Betts a parlour maid and Edith Lilly Isabella Oakwell a cook.

In the 1911 census William was serving as an 18 year old Midshipman, on HMS Indomitable, a battlecruiser. His father Edward, now aged 47 was still an assistant master at Epsom College living at No. 2, The College. His mother Hilda, aged 43, stated that she had given birth to four children, and that they were all still living. The family still employed three servants.

Following in the footsteps his maternal grandfather, William joined the Royal Navy. On 13 September 1905 at the very young age of 12 years and 7 months he joined a Naval training establishment. He remained there until 15 May 1910 when he joined HMS Indomitable as a Midshipman. Further promotions followed:

     · 15 September 1912: Promoted Acting Sub-Lieutenant.
     · 30 July 1913: Promoted Sub-Lieutenant.
     · 30 May 1915: Promoted Lieutenant.

From William's service record it is apparent that whilst he was hard working, sober and his general conduct was very good, he was also a very slow learner. In fact the last entry in his service record reads: Ignorant of his duties. Wishes to learn but is stupid.

William served on a number of ships before his final posting to HMS Defence. This ship was launched in 1907 and was the last armoured cruiser built in the Pembroke dockyard for the Royal Navy. She was the flagship of Rear Admiral Sir Robert K Arbuthnot, Bart., C.B., M.V.O. who lead the First Cruiser Squadron, consisting of HMS Defence, HMS Warrior and HMS Black Prince, all of which sailed 16 miles ahead of the main battle fleet at the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916.

HMS Defence (1907) showing stern 9.2 inch Mk XI guns
HMS Defence (1907) showing stern 9.2 inch Mk XI guns.

SMS Wienbaden, a German cruiser, had been badly damaged ahead of the British battlecruisers. HMS Defence and HMS Warrior were preparing to destroy the German battleship but became targets themselves for other German battlecruisers which were hidden by smoke and mist. After some initial damage, HMS Defence was struck by a salvo of enemy gunfire which triggered explosions of her ammunition rails leading to the broadside 7.5 inch guns. Within seconds, more shots were fired by the Germans which, up until 2001, was thought to have completely blown up the entire ship, which then sank with the loss of Arbuthnot and her entire complement of 54 officers, 845 men and 4 civilians.

One of these officers was 23 year old Lieutenant William Norman Gardiner. He was just one of the 903 people who died when 'HMS Defence' was sunk by enemy gunfire and died on the evening of 31 May 1916, during the Battle of Jutland.

Although at the time it was believed that the battleship had been completely fragmented by the attack, a diving team in 2001 found that in fact the ship was largely intact, dispite its violent sinking. The divers found her upright, on an even keel, in around 45m of water. Because of the cordite which was hit, the hull had apparentely melted. The final resting place of HMS Defense is now protected under the Protection of Military Remains Act.

Extract from the Official History; "Naval Operations" by Sir Julian S. Corbett. 1923
...........Both the Defence and Warrior had already hit the doomed Wiesbaden. Still Admiral Arbuthnot, in spite of straddling salvoes, held on till within 5,500 yards of his prey he turned to starboard. Both ships were now in a hurricane of fire, which the Germans were concentrating with terrible effect to save their burning ship, and there quickly followed another of the series of appalling catastrophes which so tragically distinguish this battle from all others. Four minutes after crossing the Lion's bows the Defence was hit by two heavy salvoes in quick succession, and the Admiral and his flagship disappeared in a roar of flame (6.20). The Warrior barely escaped a similar fate..............
The St Martin's church Roll of Honour states that:
WILLIAM NORMAN GARDINER, was a Navy Officer at the outbreak of the war and was killed in action at the Battle of Jutland on the 31st May 1916.
The Epsom Advertiser dated 9 June 1916 printed the following:
DIED IN BATTLE. - Amongst those who lost their lives in last week's titanic naval battle was Lieut. Wm. Norman Gardiner. R.N., of H.M.S. "Defence," who was the son of Mr. E. Norman Gardiner, a master at Epsom College.
William is commemorated on the Royal Naval Memorial at Plymouth, as is his brother Edward. The brothers are also remembered on the grave of their maternal Grandfather, Rear Admiral William Bowden (grave M5894) in St Mary's Church, Wolborough, Devon:

Also in proud memory of his Grandsons
William Norman Gardiner Edward Ambrose Norman Gardiner
Lieut. R.N.: H.M.S. Defence Lt. Com. R.N.: H.M.S. Hermes
31 May 1916 aged 23 9 April 1942 aged 38
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR THEIR COUNTRY

Plymouth Naval Memorial
Plymouth Naval Memorial
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2014

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GARMAN Percy, Private. 7292.

2 East Surrey Regiment.
Killed in Action 25 April 1915, aged 20.

P Garman's inscription on the Menin Gate Memorial
Percy Garman's inscription on the Menin Gate Memorial
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

Percy Garman was born in 1895 (GRO reference: Mar 1895 Epsom 2a 21) to Harry and Mary Jane Garman (nee Monk). Baptised St Mary's 17th March 1895.

In the 1901 census they lived at 1 Kiln cottages in London Road, near the 'Brick Kiln Inn'. Percy's father was a 51 year old garden labourer. His mother was 42. Percy had two brothers, Fred aged 15, a garden labourer like his father, and Harry aged 4.

He was a member of the Ewell Old Boys' Association in 1913-1914, and lived 17, North View Villas, Ewell.

No.17 North View Villas
No.17 North View Villas
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2007

The Surrey recruitment register shows that Percy Garman (transcribed Gorman) enlisted on 7 September 1914 at Epsom, into the Royal Fusiliers at the age of 19 years and 7 months. He was 5 feet 9 inches tall, weighed 148 lbs, and had a chest measurement of 36 ½ inches with an expansion of 2 inches. He had a fair complexion, blue eyes, fair hair, and was a gardener.

Percy must have transferred at some stage into the 2nd Battalion East Surrey Regiment. The Battalion was in the 85th Brigade 28th Division. Between 24th April and 4th May 1915 the 'Battle of St Julien', part of the 'Second battle of Ypres' was fought.

From the East Surrey History:

     "on the 25th April at 5 a.m. the enemy opened shrapnel fire which continued till 9 a.m., when the trenches were heavily bombarded. The fumes from the shells, against which no protection had as yet been devised, again affected the men and in some cases rendered them unconscious. The casualties to noon had been 4 killed and 18 wounded.
     At about 1 p.m. the enemy attacked the whole line held by the Battalion, breaking through Trench 23, the garrison of which had been rendered helpless by the fumes. About fifty Germans occupied a small trench in rear of this, but were dislodged, and eight were captured. The remainder of these men made for the railway, but A Company, which was in the dugouts there, attacked them and captured one officer and twenty-eight men, disposing of the remainder. A Company then advanced to Trench 23 and left an officer and twenty men as reinforcements there. The enemy had also succeeded in occupying the central position of Trench 24, but were speedily driven out by the Middlesex company at the point of the bayonet. Trench 25, on the left, was also pierced by a strong force of the enemy, who gained possession of the centre of the trench and defeated all attempts to dislodge them. The enemy in attacking were careful not mask the loopholes of their own trenches, and the fire from these loopholes caused heavy casualties among our men, who, having no loopholes, were obliged to fire over the parapet. Two companies of the Shropshire Light Infantry , arrived at 9.15 to endeavour to drive the enemy out of Trench 25, but two attacks made at 12.30 a.m. and 3.30 a.m. on the 26th April were unsuccessful."

The Epsom Advertiser dated 18th June 1915 printed:

Ewell Parish Council meeting, news had been received of the death of Mr Percy Garman.

Percy was one of 103 men from the 2nd East Surrey's who lost their lives on 25th April 1915. He commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Panel 34. CWGC states he was the 'Son of Harry and Mary Jane Garman, 17, North View Villas, Kingston Road, Ewell.

BH EW ES

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GASKELL David Lyndsay Stranack, 2nd Lieutenant

16th Battalion Welsh regiment.
Died of wounds 12 January 1916, aged 22.

David Gaskell
David Gaskell
Image Source: The Sphere, 11 March 1916

David Lyndsay Stranack Gaskell was born in Chittagong, India on 27 September 1893 to James Stranack Gaskell and his wife Henrietta Helen Gaskell (nee Sinclair).

David, or Lyndsay as he is called in his obituary in the Times, was educated at Kent House Preparatory School and Tonbridge School where he served in the OTC. The 1911 census records him as a pupil at Tonbridge Grammar School. On leaving school he became an articled clerk with Beale and Company, Westminster solicitors to the Midland Railway Company. He was reading for his final examination when war broke out.

On 8 August 1914 he attested at Armoury House Finsbury. He was 5ft 8½ins tall, with a 35 in chest and 3in expansion. He had full vision, a satisfactory physical development and was pronounced fit for service with D coy HAC, infantry. A certificate confirming that he had passed in the first division as a student of London University was attached to his application. He gave his parents' address as Wennington Cottage, Lynwood Avenue, Epsom.

He was on home service as a Private from 8 Aug until 17 Sept 1914, then took part in the Expeditionary Force No.2 Coy, 1st Bn HAC until 20 May 1915, He returned as a corporal and was appointed to a commission in 16 Service Battalion,(Cardiff City) the Welch Regiment. He was formally discharged from the HAC on 6 July 1915. He returned to France as 2nd Lieutenant with the 16 Bn of Welch Guards on 4 December 1915.

The Army returned £56 to his father, plus his effects which included a cheque book, 2 cigarette cases, a silver match box, a cigarette holder, a letter and a diary, a pocket book with a pencil, a pocket case, 1 white metal flask, a mouth organ and a note case. He did not leave a will, and his gross estate was valued at £218.

The Battalion War Diary tells us that on 6 January 1916 the Battalion was in billets at Robecq. On 11 January 2Lt D.L.S. Gaskell and six men were wounded by a grenade exploding prematurely, whilst at practice. One man died immediately afterwards, four were admitted to hospital and one man was able to return to duty. Lyndsay died of his wounds at 1.40a.m. at 32 Casualty Clearing station the next day 12 January, and was buried at St Venant Communal Cemetery. His grave was marked with a wooden cross and the inscription 32 CCS No.12. and the C of E chaplain recorded the position of the grave.

David's headstone in the St Venant Communal Cemetery
David's headstone in the St Venant Communal Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2013

The St Venant Communal Cemetery
The St Venant Communal Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2013

Obituaries appeared in the Epsom Advertiser 21 January 1916 and in the Times 19 Jan 1916:

Gaskell died of wounds in France. Lyndsay 2nd Lieutentant of 16 Service Bn Welch regiment. Dearly loved and only son of James Stranack Gaskell M.Inst,C.E, 17 Victoria Street Westminster and Mrs Gaskell Epsom. Aged 22.

The head of the firm in which he was articled wrote in the highest terms of his character and abilities. His Colonel also: "From the moment he joined us he set a standard of conduct that was of the greatest value in the battalion." His company commander: "By his exceptional keenness with his platoon, he earned the appreciation of his men and of the senior officers."

From the Epsom Advertiser 21 January 1916;

David was educated at Kent House Preparatory School Eastbourne, and at Tonbridge School. He was articled to Messrs. Beale and Co., Westminster, solicitors to the Midland Railway Company, and was reading for his final examination when war broke out. He joined the H.A.C., and went to France as a private in the 2nd Company of the 1st Battalion in September 1914, remaining at the front until July 1915, when as a corporal, he returned to England and took up a commission in the 16th Welsh Regiment, which left England for France on December 4th. He was the only son of Mr. James S. Gaskell, M.Inst.C.E., 17, Victoria Street, Westminster, and Epsom.
The St. Martin's church Roll of honour states that:
DAVID LYNDSAY STRANACK GASKELL, was killed in action in France on the 12th January 1916.
The CWGC states that he was the:
Son of James Stranack Gaskell and Henrietta Helen Gaskell, of 'Pine Neuk', Eaton Road, Branksome Park, Bournemouth'.

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GAUNT George, Private. 46653.

11th Leicestershire Regiment
Killed in Action 23 October 1917, aged 36

George Gaunt
George Gaunt
Image courtesy of Paul Blake © 2010

George Gaunt was born in 1881 (GRO reference: Sep 1881 St Neots 3b 285) to William and Caroline Gaunt (nee Andrew). He was baptised at Eynsford parish church on 21 September 1881.

From the 1881 census (before George was born) the family lived in Montague Street, Eynesbury, Hunts. George's father was a 37 year old 'Bricklayer'. His mother was also 37, and there were four children William 9, Alice 7, Charles 6 and Louisa 4.

From the 1891 census the family lived in Washbank Road, Eynesbury, Huntingdon. One of George's older brothers, Charles, was still living at home and was a sixteen year old errand boy. Sister Alice was a seventeen year old domestic cook living in Fulham, and sister Louisa was staying with her uncle Frederick, a farmer and publican, living in Bedfordshire. William has not been found.

By the 1901 census the family has moved to River Terrace, St Neots. William senior and Charles were both bricklayers, but George was working as a 'Mason's Apprentice'.

In the 1911 census George was shown as a 29 year old asylum attendant working and living at the Horton asylum.

Woodley Terrace in 2006
7 Woodley Terrace in 2006
Copyright image courtesy of Clive Gilbert 2006

In 1913 George Gaunt married Lucy Wood. There were two sons born to the marriage Maurice George, who was baptised at St Mary's Ewell on 2 Nov 1913, and Alan Charles born on 16 June 1917 and baptised at St Mary's on 10 August 1917.

George appears in the 'LCC Record of War Service' book, having worked at the Horton Asylum. The book states that his Army service was between 1916 and 1917, and that he was in France only for 1½ months. As he was killed in action on 23 October 1917, he presumably reached France around the beginning of September 1917.

George's widow Lucy and their son Maurice visiting his grave in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
George's widow Lucy and their son Maurice visiting his grave in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Image courtesy of Sarah Hicks and her Tracing Ghosts website © 2010

George Gaunt's headstone in the Ypres Reservoir Cemetery
George Gaunt's headstone in the Ypres Reservoir Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

The Surrey Recruitment Register states that he attested on 17 December 1915, in Epsom, at the age of 34. He was living at 7 Woodley Terrace, Plough Road, West Ewell. He was 5 feet 8 ¼ inches tall, weighed 138 lbs, had a chest measurement of 37 inches, with an expansion of 3 inches. He had obviously completed his mason's apprenticeship as he is now shown as a stonemason.

He originally enlisted as a sapper in the Royal Engineers (RE) no. 183897, but later became Pte. 46653. in the 11th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, a 'Pioneer' battalion attached to the 6th Division. Although all trained infantrymen, the Pioneers were primarily a labouring force, to make or mend roads and trenches. Many were recruited from the ranks of the RE and had useful skills, such as George's stonemasonry. The War Diary of the 11th Leicesters tells us that George was employed in the laying of Light Railways in the Dickesbusch and Ypres areas of Belgium.

On the 23 October 1917 a shell dropped amongst a party of 'D' Company killing 10 men including George, who is buried in plot 1. 1. 15. Ypres Reservoir Cemetery. The 10 men were all buried side by side in plots 1. 1. 10 to 1. 1. 17.

His widow remarried, to become Lucy Blake (formerly Gaunt), 7 Woodley Terrace, Plough Road, West Ewell. The CWGC states he was the 'Son of William and Caroline Gaunt, of Eynesbury, St Neots, Hunts; husband of Lucy Blake (formerly Gaunt), of 7, Woodley Terrace, Plough Road, West Ewell, Surrey. However, before she remarried she was involved in a court case "Taunts no excuse", which made reference to her husband being killed in the war.

Advertiser 16th November 1917:
ROLL OF HONOUR: Mrs. Gaunt, of West Ewell, had lost her husband.
Observer 14th December 1917:
ROLL OF HONOUR. Acknowledgments of letters of sympathy sent out by the council were received from Mrs. Parker, Mrs Gaunt, Mr J.H. Bridges, Mrs. Ayling and Mr. Warr.
Extract from the St Neots Advertiser:
On the very next day another local man was added to the growing casualty list, when Sapper George Gaunt, the son of William and Caroline Gaunt of River Terrace, Eynesbury and the husband of Lucy Gaunt, was killed. He had left Eynesbury to work in Surrey at the Epsom Asylum, and it was there that he had enlisted. The work of sappers was as dangerous as that of any soldier, as they worked at a variety of tasks, ranging from trench work to mining to construction in or close to the front line. Therefore their casualty figures were high as artillery barrages, sniper's bullets and mortars took their toll. George Gaunt joined the list of those sappers killed when he fell on 23rd October, together with 11 others from the 11th Leicesters, Midland Pioneers. He is buried in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery.
George was awarded the British War medal and the Victory medal.

George's inscription on the Eynesbury War Memorial
Eynesbury Parish Church St Neots, Hunts
George's inscription on the Eynesbury War Memorial
at the Eynesbury Parish Church
Images courtesy of Deb Depledge © 2009

BH EW AS HWH Eynsbury parish church, St Neots.
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GIRLING Charles Norman, Private. 94208.

12th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment).
Died 5 September 1918 aged 42.

Charles' headstone in Epsom Cemetery
Charles' headstone in Epsom Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2014

Charles Norman Girling was born in Charsfield, Suffolk in 1877 (GRO reference: Mar 1877 Woodbridge 4a 738), the tenth child of Isaac and Alice Girling (nee Goodream). Charles' parents married in the March 1860 quarter in the Hoxne registration district and produce at least 14 children, all born in Suffolk.

CHARLES NORMAN GIRLING AND HIS SIBLINGS
Name Born - Died Notes
Alice Eleanor Born: 1860 Laxfield Married Benjamin Rofe 1880
Maria Martha Born: 1862 Charsfield  
Robert Isaac Born: 1863 Charsfield  
Lilly Horald Born: 1864 Charsfield  
Ellen Elizabeth Born: 1866 Charsfield  
George William Born: 1868 Charsfield Married Laura Hubbard 1894
Bessie Emma Born: 1869 Charsfield  
Arthur Albert Born: 1871 Charsfield Married Rose Sarah Whitrod 1897
William John Born: 1873 Charsfield  
Charles Norman Born: 1877 Charsfield
Died: 5 September 1918 Epsom
Twin
Isaac Francis Born: 1877 Charlsfield Twin. Enlisted 13 July 1916. Did not serve overseas
Florence Mary Born: 1878 Charsfield  
John Philip Born: 1880 Charsfield  
Herbert Benjamin Born: 1884 Charsfield  

In the 1861 census the family home was in Grundisburgh, Suffolk. Charles' father was aged 21 and worked as a wheelwright. His mother was aged 21 and oldest sister Alice was aged 8 months.

By 1871 the family had moved to Charlsfield. Charles' father was still earning his living as a wheelwright, and seven more siblings had been born.

Little had changed by 1881, Charles had another three siblings, including his twin Isaac Francis. Charles' brother Robert, like his father, was working as a wheelwright and sister Maria was working as a parlour maid for the vicar of Wombourn, Staffordshire.

The 1891 census records the family living in Church Street, Charsfield. Charles' father was described as a 'wheelwright and general smith'. It seems that when they were old enough the male members of the family became smiths or wheelwrights: Brother George was a wheelwright, brother Arthur was a shoeing and general smith, William was a smith, Isaac was an apprentice wheelwright and Charles was an apprentice smith.

Charles' mother died in 1897 aged 54.

Still living in Charsfield, by 1901 Charles' unmarried brother William, aged 28 had become head of the family and was described as a coachbuilder, employer. Charles, aged 24, was similarly described as a coachbuilder, employer. Also living there was Charles' 60 year old widowed father, his 39 year old sister, Maria and 17 year old brother Herbert, a wheelwright, worker.

Charles' father died in 1907 aged 68.

The 1911 census records the family still living in Charsfield and still in the coach building business. Brother William, now married to Emily and the father of three daughters, was still the head of the family. Charles and William were partners in the coach building business whilst brother Herbert was an assistant in the business. They employed one domestic servant, Ethel Daisy Swan, aged 14.

As Charles' service record has not survived little is known about his military service. The Soldiers Died CD tells us that he initially served in the Royal Engineers as Private 18334 and was later transferred to the 12th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, a Pioneer Battalion in the 24th Division. Pioneer Battalions, although weapon trained and expected to fight if needed, were mainly a source of labour supporting the front line infantry. As he was awarded the British War medal and the Victory medal for his service with the Sherwood Foresters we know that he was sent overseas after 1915 and had transferred from the RE by then.

Charles died on 5 September 1918 in the Horton War Hospital and was buried in grave D336 in Epsom Cemetery on 9 September. Unfortunately we do not know why or when he was admitted to Horton War or his cause of death.

He is not commemorated on any memorial within Epsom and Ewell but is commemorated in the village of his birth and upbringing, on the Charsfield, Suffolk War Memorial.

BEC

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GLADMAN John, Private. G/28365.

1st Battalion Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment).
Killed in Action 28 June 1918, aged 19.

John Gladman's inscription on the Ploegsteert Memorial
John Gladman's inscription on the Ploegsteert Memorial
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

John Stanley Gladman was born in 1898 (GRO reference Mar 1899 Epsom 2a 24) to John and Alice Gladman (nee Ballard). His parents had married in the December 1896 quarter in the Greenwich registration district

In the 1901 census the family lived at 2 Woodland Cottages, Epsom. (John Stanley is shown as 2 year old Stanley). John's father, also John was a 32 year old gas stoker. His mother Alice was 32. He had an older sister Ethel aged 4, and a younger brother Albert aged 2 months.

John Stanley Gladman And His Siblings
Name Born - Died Notes
Hilda May Born: 1897 Greenwich
Died: 1897 Greenwich
Twin of Ethel Violet
Ethel Violet Born 1897: Greenwich
Died 1908: Epsom
Twin of Hilda May
John Stanley Born: 1898: Epsom
Died: 28 June 1918 France
 
Albert Born: 1901 Epsom  
Daisy Born: 1903 Epsom  
Ivy Born: 1906 Epsom  
Charles Born; 1909 Epsom Married Margaret Kinsella 1937. RAF, died 3 August 1941, Dorking Hospital

The 1911 census shows the family living at 27, Hook Road, Epsom. John's mother recorded that she had given birth to seven children and that five were still living. John and his surviving siblings were at school, and his father was still earning his living as a gas stoker. Wallace Chantry, a 29 year old musician, was a boarder with the family.

The Surrey recruitment register shows 18 year old J Gladman attesting on 20th November 1916 in Epsom. He was 5 feet 3 inches, weighed 104 lbs, and had a chest measurement of 32 inches, with an expansion of 2 inches. He was a greengrocer living at 5 Gibraltar Road, Ewell. His medical grade was A4 which meant that he was physically fit, but until he was aged 19 he was under age to be sent overseas to fight. (In April 1918 the age limit was reduced to 18). John he was assigned to the 31st Reserve Training Battalion.

At some point John was transferred to the 1st Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment, which was in the 13th Brigade, 5th Division. The Regimental History tells us that the Battalion received three large drafts, in February, March and May 1918. John was probably in one of these drafts.

Contemporary trench map of the area around La Becque. Click on the map for a larger version
Contemporary trench map of the area around La Becque.
Click on the map for a larger version.

The German spring offensive on the Lys between 9 April and 30 April had won them large amounts of territory. On 28th June 1918 an attack was ordered to take back some of that territory. The 1st Queen's were ordered to attack from higher ground towards a small stream called the Plate Becque. To surprise the enemy there was no preliminary bombardment but at 6am a heavy barrage was started as the infantry started their attack. The barrage was so close to the attacking men that several of them became casualties from their own artillery. The attack, often being hand-to-hand and with the bayonet, was successful in reaching its objective but thirty six men from the 1st Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) lost their lives including John killed in action. He is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Panel 8.

John was awarded the British War medal and the Victory medal.

BH EW

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GLOVER Albert Edward, Private. 2479.

3rd Battalion London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers).
Killed in Action 8 October 1916, aged 19.

A Glover's Headstone in the A.I.F. Burial Ground, Flers
A Glover's Headstone in the A.I.F. Burial Ground, Flers
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2006

Private Albert Edward Glover was born at Bowes Park, London in 1897 (GRO reference: Mar 1897 Edmonton 3a 471) to Henry George and Elizabeth Glover (nee Brown).

In the 1901 census the family was living at 30 Westberry Villa, Westberry Avenue, Tottenham. Albert's father, from Liverpool, was a 'Woollen drapers assistant'. Albert had three siblings George H. 7, Lillian M. 6 and Dorothy M. 1.

1913 electoral roll lived 'Clovelly' Chesterfield Road.

For many years Albert was a member of the All Saints Choir.

Albert enlisted at Edward Street, Paddington, London, where he joined the 3rd Battalion London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers. He was assigned for training to its 2nd Battalion (2/3 London Regiment). The Battalion did some training on Epsom Downs.

Albert's medal card tells us that he entered the Egyptian theatre of war on 19 April 1915. On 13 October 1915 the 2/3 Battalion landed at Cape Helles, Gallipoli. In January 1916 they were evacuated from Gallipoli, and moved to France via Egypt. The Battalion was disbanded in June 1916 an Albert transferred to 1/3 Battalion.

On Sunday the 8 October 1916 the 1/3rd Royal Fusiliers were in the 167th Brigade, 56th Division.

The phase of the battle between 7 and 20 October was known as the 'Battle of the Transloy Ridges'. The 56th Division was positioned between Lesboeufs and Le Transloy. On the Division right, at 3.30pm the 5th London Rifle Brigade attacked Hazy Trench, whilst the 3rd and the 9th London Regiment attacked Dewdrop and Spectrum trenches. But by nightfall the Germans had pushed them back to their starting point.

On the 8 October 1916, 67 men from the 3rd London Regiment lost their lives including Albert killed in action. He is buried in A.I.F. Burial Ground, Flers, 11 H 23. The CWGC states he was the 'Son of Henry George and Elizabeth Glover, of 'Sanderstead' Chesterfield Road, West Ewell, Surrey.

Sanderstead, Chesterfield Road
Albert's parents lived at 'Sanderstead', Chesterfield Road
Copyright image courtesy of Liz Manterfield 2006.

With thanks to Ajax Bardrick for supplying additional information.

BH EW ES AS

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GOBEY Frederick William, Corporal. 24045.

38th Company, Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA).
Died 14 November 1918, aged 30.

Fredricks's headsone in Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery
Fredricks's headsone in Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2014

Frederick William Goby born 24 April 1888 in Dorking (GRO reference: Jun 1888 Dorking 2a 155) to Henry Isaac and Anne Eliza Goby (nee Fowle). (Note: Goby is spelt Gobey on the Ashley Road memorial and the St. Barnabas church Roll of Honour). Frederick's parents were married in the June 1886 quarter in the Horsham registration district. Frederick was baptised on 10 April 1891 whilst the family was living at 2, North Street, Dorking.

The 1881 census records the family living at Wants Road, Malden, Essex. Frederick's father was a 35 year old tin plate worker. His mother was aged 25 and there were two older siblings, Ellen Susan aged 3 and Henry Isaac aged 4 weeks. Visiting that night was 10 year old Rose Fowle.

FREDERICK GOBY AND HIS SIBLINGS
Name Born - Died Notes
Ellen Susan Born: 1878 Windsor Married John Ford 1909 Epsom
Henry Isaac Born: 1881 Malden Essex
Died: 1935 Middle House Dorking Road
Served Labour Corps and Engineers
Epsom cemetery grave F403
Frank Thomas Born; 1883 Horsham Sussex
Died: 1928 Middle House Dorking Road
Served ASC and, previously RGA
Epsom cemetery grave F403
James Arthur Born: 1885 Horsham Sussex Served Middlesex Regiment.
Silver War Badge, due to wounds
Frederick William Born: 24 April 1888 Dorking Surrey
Died: 14 November 1918 Plymouth Devon
 
Charles Edward Born: 1893 Dorking Surrey
Died: 1935 8 Castle Road Epsom
Served Border Regiment
Epsom cemetery grave K487

In 1891 the family was living at 2, North Street, Dorking, and Frederick's father was still earning his living by working tin plate.

After the birth of Frederick's brother Charles in 1893, the family moved to one of the Bailey's Cottages, in South Street, Epsom. On 1 April 1898 Frederick was admitted to Ewell Boys School, having previously attended Epsom National school. His date of birth is shown as 20 April 1886 but should be 1888. He was not a scholar there for long, leaving on 17 October 1898 through illness.

The 1901 census records that the family were living at 2 (Bailey's Cottages), South Street, Epsom. Frederick's father was still working with tin plate, but now on his own account. Frederick, aged 14, worked as an errand boy, whilst brother Henry was a butcher, brother Frank worked as a labourer and Charles was still at school. Sister Ellen was working as a cook at 'Timber Lodge', Ashtead.

The 1911 census records the family living at 225, Hook Road, Epsom. Aged 62, Frederick's father was still working with tin plate and his brother Henry was still a butcher. Brother Arthur James was a window cleaner, brother Frank Thomas was a chauffeur and Charles Edward was a grocer's assistant. Frederick was not with the family on census night. The census entry for the Royal Garrison Artillery barracks at Plympton St Mary, Devon records a 22 year old Frank Goby who was born in Dorking, Surrey. I suspect this was Frederick, although why he should be shown as Frank is a mystery.

Frederick married Annie Amelia Pengelly in 1912 in the Plymouth registration district. They had three children, John born and died in 1912, Frederick H. born on 29 December 1913 and Violet V. in 1916.

Frederick's service record did not survive the Blitz but the CWGC tells us that he served in the 38th Company RGA. This Company was a home service unit, part of the South Western Coastal defences, so Frederick was not entitled to any medals.

Frederick died 14 November 1918, probably a victim of the great influenza pandemic raging at the time. He is buried in Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery in plot Church C 7545. His daughter Violet died in the St. Germans (Cornwall) registration district in early 1919, possibly from the same thing. No GRO records have been found for Frederick's widow remarrying or dying.

Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery
Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2014

Frederick's father also died in 1919 at 225, Hook Road and was buried in Epsom cemetery on 11 December in grave K717. His mother died in 1934 at 225, Hook Road and she was buried on 28 December in grave F403, the same grave as her sons Henry and Frank.

EP SB

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GOBLE Archer Edward, Private. 56804.

18th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers.
Killed in Action 1 June 1918, aged 18.

Archer's headsone in Martinsart British Cemetery
Archer's headsone in Martinsart British Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2012

Archer Edward Goble was born in 1899 (GRO reference: Lewisham 1d 1167) to William and Mary Ann Goble (nee Terry). Archer's parents married in the September quarter of 1887 in the Epsom registration district.

In the 1891 census, before Archer was born, the family lived at 2, Bristow's Cottages, Lintons Lane, Epsom. Archer's father was a 36 year old bricklayer's labourer. His mother was aged 28 and there were two siblings, Bertha aged 2 and Ada aged 5months. Also living with the family were two cousins, Elizabeth Goble aged 10 and Emma Goble aged 8.

Archer Edward Goble And His Siblings
Name Born - Died
Bertha Catherine Born: 1889 Epsom
Ada Elizabeth Born: 1890 Epsom
William James Born: 1892 Epsom
Edith Maud Born: 1894 Croydon registration district
Died: 1896 Croydon registration district
May Eliza Born: 1896 Thornton Heath
Ivy Alice Born: 1898 Catford
Died: 1910 Kingston registration district
Archer Edward Born: 1899 Catford
Died: 1 June 1918 France
Charles V Born 1901: Sydenham
Violet Primrose Born 1904: Worcester Park

In 1901 the family lived at 39, Brookdale Road, Catford, where Archer's father earned his living as a brick maker.

The 1911 census records the family living at 23, Greenfell Street, Greenwich. Archer's father was now working as a labourer in a Gas Works and his 20 year old sister Ada was working as a domestic servant. Archer's mother stated that she had given birth to nine children and that seven were still alive.

Archer attested on 25 June 1917 at Kingston, giving his age as 18 years. He was 5 feet 2 inches tall and weighed 94 lbs. He had a chest measurement of 31 inches with an expansion of 4 inches. His medical grade was A4, which meant he would be grade A1 or A2 once he reached the age of 19, the then legal minimum age to be sent overseas to fight. (In April 1918 the minimum age was reduced to 18). He was initially assigned to the 27th Training Reserve Battalion, a battalion specifically for younger soldiers. Archer stated that he worked as a gardener, and that he lived at 14, Stones Road, Epsom.

Archer was later transferred to the 18th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, although in all probability he had never been to Lancashire. After the bloodbath of the 1916 Somme battle, men were sent to any battalion that needed reinforcements, regardless of where the men came from.

The 18th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers was in the 104th Brigade, 35th Division. On 29 May 1918 the battalion was holding the line at Aveluy Wood just east of the small village of Martinsart and about 3 miles north of Albert. The Germans held most of Aveluy Wood, and this was as far as they had reached after their huge offensive, the Kaiserschlacht, that had commenced on 21 March and petered out by 5 April. On 1 June Archer's battalion was to attack the wood. The following is an extract from the Battalion War Diary:
1-6-18. Battalion takes part in an attack on AVELUY WOOD. Objective reached but unable to be held. Capt WS Morris and 2/Lieut Thompson killed in action. Lieut Ward MC, 2/Lieuts Crowder, Grimshaw, Parry, Pritchett (died of wounds 3-6-18), Turnbull (died of wounds 4-6-18 and Gresty wounded, 2/Lieut Almond wounded and missing.
18 ORs killed in action
5 ORs wounded and missing
43 ORs missing
122 ORs wounded in action
17 ORs wounded (at duty)
5 ORs wounded in action (died of wounds)
Battalion relieved by the 19th DLI and 17th Royal Scots
1 OR proceeds on leave to UK
2-6-18. Battalion shelled by gas shells whilst proceeding to HEDAUVILLE.
No major battles were in progress at the time, and this 'little' battle does not merit a mention in the Official History of the war. The 'Soldiers Died' CD tells us that 4 Officers and 67 ORs from the Battalion died on 1 June 1918.

The St Martin's church Roll of Honour states that:
ARCHER EDWARD GOBLE, was killed in action in France on the 1st June 1918.
The Epsom Advertiser dated 21 June 1918 printed the following:
PTE. ARCHER EDWARD GOBLE, (19), son of Mr. W. Goble, 14, Stone's-road, has, we regret to learn, been killed in action.
Archer is buried in plot I B 19 in Martinsart British Cemetery. He was awarded the British War medal and the Victory medal.

The Martinsart British Cemetery
The Martinsart British Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2012

EP SM

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GODDEN William, Private 7126.

8 Royal Fusiliers.
Killed in Action 24 March 1916, aged 24.

Private Edward Godden
Private Edward Godden
Image courtesy of Colonel Steven Smith MBE. © 2009.

Edward William Godden was born in 1891 (GRO reference: Dec 1891 East Ashford 2a 773) to Alfred and Jane Godden (nee Gower). The name William Godden appears on St Mary's memorial, and Pt W. Godden RF appears on the Dipping well memorial i.e. without the 'Edward'. At the time he enlisted he was employed as a gardener at "Springfield" by Mrs Walters. It was most likely Mrs Walters had his name added to the memorials, and she probably only knew him as William.

The 1891 census shows the family living at Cheesemans Green, Mersham, East Ashford. Edward's father Alfred was a 39 year old farm labourer, his mother was 32, and probably spent all her time looking after the seven children she had before William was born. They were, Ernest Frederick aged 12, Emiline Alice aged 9, Horace Henry aged 10, Sophia Maud aged 7, Annie Amelia aged 5, Mary aged 3 and Harry aged 9 months.

By the 1901 census Jane was shown as the head of the family, as Alfred was in Maidstone's Ophthalmic Hospital. William had another four siblings John aged 6, twins Fanny and Alfred aged 3 and Rose aged 2. So, Edward William Godden had eleven siblings.

The Surrey Recruitment Register shows that E.W. Godden was born in Ashford, attested in Epsom on 21st October 1914, and joined the Royal Fusiliers. He was 5 feet 6 ½ inches tall and weighed 132 lbs. His chest measured 34 ½ inches with an expansion of 3 ½ inches. He had a fresh complexion, grey eyes and brown hair, and he had been a gardener.

The 8th Royal Fusiliers were in the 36th Brigade 12th division and at the time of William's death were in the area of the Hohenzollern Redoubt. The 36th Brigade had attacked on 2 March 1916 after the RE had detonated 4 mines under the enemy front line trench called 'The Chord'. They successfully captured the mine craters and had gained a useful observation point over enemy lines as far as Fosse 8. Severe fighting continued in the area for the next few weeks, the division being relieved on 26 April. Between 2 March and 26 April the 8 Royal Fusiliers had 101 men killed.

Private Edward Godden's gravestone in the Vermelles British Cemetery
Private Edward Godden's gravestone in the Vermelles British Cemetery.
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2007.

On 24 March 1916 two men from the 8th Royal Fusiliers lost their lives including William killed in action. He is buried in Vermelles British Cemetery, 11 N 23. The CWGC states he was the 'Son of Alfred & Jane Godden, 12, Mersham Street, Ashford.

Vermelles Cross of Sacrifice.
Vermelles Cross of Sacrifice.
Image source Clive Gilbert © 2007

William's medal card states that he went to France on 31 May 1915, and that he was awarded the 1915 star, British War medal and the Victory medal.

The letter accompanying Edward's Star Medal
The letter accompanying Edward's Star Medal
Image courtesy of Colonel Steven Smith MBE. © 2009.

From the Epsom Advertiser dated 21 April 1916 reporting on the Ewell Council meeting:
Mr Glyn mentioned that since the last meeting he had heard of the death of another young fellow who, prior to enlistment, was engaged in the garden of Mrs Radcliffe Waters. His name was Godden. It was agreed that a letter of sympathy be sent to the relatives.
The following is from a newspaper cutting supplied by William's great nephew Colonel Steven Smith MBE. Unfortunately the date and title of the newspaper are not known but it is probably from a paper local to Mersham.
Official news has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Godden, of Mersham, of the death of their son Pvt. W. Godden, Royal Fusiliers, who was killed in action on March 24th. Born at Mersham he was educated at the Council Schools, and was a member of the church choir. Leaving school he went to work for Miss Mackinnon, Church House, Smeeth, in whose service he remained for 4½ years. When war broke out he was in the employ of Mrs. Walters, Springfield, at Ewell, near Epsom. From there he joined the Army in October, 1914. He proceeded to France on May 31st, 1915, and was wounded in June, being then sent to England for five months. On recovering he returned to France on November 24th of the same year, and met his death fighting for his country. Much sympathy has been expressed by a large number of friends by whom he will be much missed.
BH EW

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GOODSHIP Charles Daniel, Private. G/50384.

2 Middlesex Regiment.
Killed in Action 27 February 1917, aged 28.

Charles Daniel Goodship was born on 2 December 1888 (GRO reference: Sep 1888 Chelsea 1a 378) to Frederick and Sarah Goodship (nee North).

In the 1891 census the family lived at 73 Little Cadogen Place, Chelsea. Charles' father was a 30 year old coachman groom domestic servant. His mother was also aged 30. He had two older brothers, Frederick aged 6, and Alfred P. aged 4, and a younger sister Clara E. aged 3 months.

By the 1901 census the family had moved to 31 Dartrey Road, Chelsea. Charles' older brothers were now both errand boys for a chemist and boot maker respectively, and he had acquired two more brothers, Arthur aged 7 and Frank aged 5.

Charles married Lily May Smith in 1913 (GRO reference Dec 1913 Epsom 2a 26). Lily May Smith was born on 2 December 1888, and died on he 74 birthday 2 December 1962. As Charles was killed in 1917, Lily May, married for 4 years was a widow for 49 years. I have found no references for children.

No. 10 Kingston Road Ewell in 2007
No. 10 Kingston Road Ewell in 2007
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2007

The Surrey recruitment registers show that Charles attested in Epsom on 12 December 1915, and that he was a coach trimmer. He was 5 feet 6 ¼ inches tall, weighed 140 lbs, and had a chest measurement of 37 inches with an expansion of 2 ½. The register also shows that he lived at 10 Kingston Road, Ewell. He was originally assigned to 30 Royal Fusiliers, a training Battalion, which on 1 September 1916 became 106th training reserve, providing troops for any unit that required them.

The 2nd Middlesex were in the 23rd Brigade, 8th Division. Between 26 to 27 February 1917 the Battalion occupied trenches near Bouchavesnes, a small village at the furthest extent to be reached by French forces during the 1916 battle of the Somme. This was a quiet period with no major battles being fought, and the Germans were preparing a strategic withdrawal many miles back to the Hindenburg line. Despite this being a quite sector the 2 Middlesex had 9 men killed, 9 wounded and 2 with shell shock.

Contemporary trench map of the area around Bouchavesnes.  Click on the image for a larger version.
Contemporary trench map of the area around Bouchavesnes.
Click on the image for a larger version.

The following is an extract from the War Diary (available from the National Archives, reference WO 95/1713);

25 February. Battalion moved to trenches in BOUCHAVESNES NORTH SECTOR relieving 2 Battalion West YORKSHIRE Regiment. Two Companies in front line "D" on right "C" on left with remaining two companies in reserve at ANDOVER (C14 a 4 1) finding nightly working parties.

26 February. "A" Company relieved "C" Company in front line.

27 February. "B" Company relieved "D" Company in front line.

A raid by 1 officer & 23 OR of "A" Company was attempted but was not pushed forward owing to party having been observed by the enemy & fired on by hostile M Gs. Party left our trenches at 12 midnight 27/28 returning at 2.30 on 28.

On 27th February 1917 Charles was killed in action. He is commemorated on Thiepval Memorial, Pier & Face 12D & 13B. The CWGC states he is the 'Son of the late Frederick & Sarah Goodship. Husband of Lily May Goodship, 10 Kingston Road, Ewell'.

Charles and his wifes headstone in St Mary's Churchyard, Ewell
Charles and his wife's headstone in St Mary's Churchyard, Ewell
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

Charles and his wife Lily May are both remembered on a headstone in St Mary's churchyard.

BH EW ES

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GOODSHIP Sidney William, Private. G.5720.

2nd Battalion East Surrey Regiment.
Killed in Action 25 April 1915, aged 20.

Sidney Goodship
Sidney Goodship
Image courtesy of Peter Collins, Sutton Grammar School Archivist

Sidney William Goodship was born on 3 April 1895 (GRO reference: Jun 1895 Hackney 1b 588) to William Charles and Alice Goodship (nee Francis).

In the 1901 census the family lived in Kingston Road (Beggars Hill) quite near the Jolly Waggoners Inn. Sidney's father was a 34 year old stationer's assistant. His mother was 33, and no other children are shown.

Sidney attended Ewell Boys School, West Street, between 11 March 1901 and 22 October 1902, when he left Ewell. The family must have returned to Ewell as he was readmitted on 13 November 1905 and remained until 1 May 1908, when he went to Sutton Grammar School. Prior to attending Ewell Boys School he attended Lauriston Road School, Hackney.

Sidney attended Sutton Grammar School. The following is an extract from the school magazine 'The Suttonian':
Left the School in July, 1909. On October 20th, 1914, joined the 2nd. East Surrey Regt. Went to France on March 24th, and was killed it is supposed in the neighbourhood of Hill 60, on April 27th. (At present these are all the particulars known).
In the 1911 census the family still lived at Kingston Road, Ewell. Sidney's father was still working as a stationer's assistant, and Sidney was working as a 'frame stitcher, process worker'. Sidney was an only child.

Sidney enlisted into the 2nd Battalion East Surrey Regiment, which was in the 85th Brigade 28th Division. Between 24th April and 4th May 1915 the 'Battle of St Julien', part of the 'Second battle of Ypres' was fought.

From the East Surrey History:
      "On the 25th April at 5 a.m. the enemy opened shrapnel fire which continued till 9 a.m., when the trenches were heavily bombarded. The fumes from the shells, against which no protection had as yet been devised, again affected the men and in some cases rendered them unconscious. The casualties to noon had been 4 killed and 18 wounded.
     At about 1 p.m. the enemy attacked the whole line held by the Battalion, breaking through Trench 23, the garrison of which had been rendered helpless by the fumes. About fifty Germans occupied a small trench in rear of this, but were dislodged, and eight were captured. The remainder of these men made for the railway, but A Company, which was in the dugouts there, attacked them and captured one officer and twenty-eight men, disposing of the remainder. A Company then advanced to Trench 23 and left an officer and twenty men as reinforcements there. The enemy had also succeeded in occupying the central position of Trench 24, but were speedily driven out by the Middlesex company at the point of the bayonet. Trench 25, on the left, was also pierced by a strong force of the enemy, who gained possession of the centre of the trench and defeated all attempts to dislodge them. The enemy in attacking were careful not mask the loopholes of their own trenches, and the fire from these loopholes caused heavy casualties among our men, who, having no loopholes, were obliged to fire over the parapet. Two companies of the Shropshire Light Infantry , arrived at 9.15 to endeavour to drive the enemy out of Trench 25, but two attacks made at 12.30 a.m. and 3.30 a.m. on the 26th April were unsuccessful."
Advertiser 18th June 1915:
Ewell Parish Council meeting, news had been received of the death of Mr Sydney Goodship.
On 25th April 1915 twenty one men from the 2nd East Surrey's lost their lives, including Sidney killed in action. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Panel 34. The CWGC states he was the 'Son of William Charles & Alice Goodship, Mount Pleasant, West Street, Ewell.

Sidney Goodship's inscription on the Menin Gate Memorial
Sidney Goodship's inscription on the Menin Gate Memorial
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

Mentioned in de Ruvigny's ROLL OF HONOUR Part 2. Son of William Goodship, of Englewood, Kingston Road, Ewell; served with the Expeditionary Force in France.

He is also remembered on the Sutton Grammar School War Memorial.

BH EW ES SGS

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GOREY Fred, Private. 60139.

101 Company Labour Corps.
Died of wounds 5 September 1918, aged 38.

Fred Gorey's inscription in Ashley Road Cemetary
Fred Gorey's inscription in Ashley Road Cemetary
Image Courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

Fred Gorey was born in 1880 (GRO reference: Sep 1880 Epsom 2a 16) to William James and Eliza Gorey (nee Jurd). Henry's parents married in 1873 in the Fareham registration district.

FRED GOREY AND HIS SIBLINGS
Name Born - Died Notes
William James Born: 1874 Epsom
Died: 1928
Buried Epsom Cemetery (F205A) 18 October 1928
George Born: 1876 Epsom Baptised 8 October 1876 St. Martins, Epsom
Henry Born: 1878 Epsom
Died: 19 May 1918
Baptised 19 February 1879 Christ Church Epsom
Fred Born: 1880 Epsom
Died: 5 September 1918
Baptised 3 March 1881 Christ Church, Epsom

In the 1881 census the family lived at 34 Adelphi Road, Epsom. Fred's father was a 39 year old railway porter. His mother Eliza was 38. Fred had three older brothers, William James aged 6, George aged 4 and Henry aged 2. Henry was also a victim of the Great War, and died of wounds in the same incident that killed Fred.

By the 1891 census they still lived at 34 Adelphi Road, but Eliza, now a widow was head of the family, William James having died aged 41 on 29 July 1882. His headstone states "WILLIAM JAMES GOREY who met his death in the midst of his duty". Eliza, was employed as a laundress working at a laundry. The oldest son William was a baker, George was a general labourer, Harry an errand boy, and Fred was still at school.

In 1901, 34 Adelphi Road remained their address. Eliza, now 56 was still a laundress, but was self employed working at home. George was a plumber, whilst Harry and Fred were both bricklayers labourers.

When the 1911 census was taken Fred was a general labourer for the LCC and was a boarder with the Odd family, living at 4 Albert Villas, Bexley, Kent. Brother Henry was working as a bricklayer's labourer and was still living at 34 Adelphi Road, with just his widowed mother. Fred's brother William James was a Sergeant with the Metropolitan Police, boarding at 10 Clarks Buildings, London. Brother George, a jobbing plumber, and his wife Daisy, of three years, were living with Daisy's parents at 24 Miles Road, Epsom.

Fred originally served in the 34th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, which was formed at Falmer, near Brighton in May and June 1916. However, on 14 May 1917 it was re-designated as the 101st Company Labour Corps. Men from the Labour Corps undertook any labouring task required of them. They built and maintained roads, railways and defences, buried the dead, and moved stores and ammunition. They laboured in quarries and forests, guarded prisoners, directed traffic and guarded prisoners.

Fred enlisted 20 March 1916 and on 23 March he was medically examined at Kingston-on-Thames barracks. He was 5 feet 9½ inches tall, weighed 172 lbs had an expanded chest measurement of 41½ inches, with a range of 3 inches. His eyesight was less than perfect, with the right eye rated at 6/18 and the left eye 6/24.

Soon after enrolling, on 7 May 1916, Fred embarked from Southampton and arrived at Havre, France the next day.

On the night of 14 May 1918, the 101st Labour Company were laying cables in the Fonquevillers (Somme) area when they were attacked by German gas shells. Three officers and 136 men were killed and a further 130 wounded by the gas. Fred, who died of wounds on 5 September 1918 was probably one of those wounded on 14 May. The same attack most likely also killed his brother Harry who is buried in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen.

The Labour Corps were not front line fighting infantry, but their job must have been very dangerous as they often worked near the front line within easy range of German artillery. Soldiers Died CD tells us that between 11 May 1918 and 5 September 1918, 1031 men from the various Labour Corps Companies died.

Fred died in Ninian Park Hospital, Cardiff. Ninian Park School was used as a hospital during the Great War, reverting again to a school when the war ended. During its time as a hospital, 31 men died there. A plaque bearing the 31 names was erected in St Paul's Church, Paget Street, Grangetown, Cardiff. Presumably bearing Fred's name. When next near Cardiff I will check.

The following appeared in the 24 May 1918 edition of the Epsom Advertiser:
SOLDIER BROTHERS GASSED. - Mrs. Gorey, 34, Adelphi Road, has received the bad news that one of her sons, Pte. Harry Gorey (39) has died in France from gas poisoning, and that another son, Pte. F. Gorey (37) is seriously ill also in consequence of gas poisoning. The two brothers were working in the same Labour Company when they were gassed. Before they joined the Army two years ago they were working in this district as bricklayers' labourers.
Fred's mother signed a receipt for his British War medal and Victory medal, engraved for the Royal Fusiliers.

Fred was buried in Epsom Cemetery, in plot C251 on 11 September 1918. His parents are also buried there, and his brother Henry is remembered on the gravestone.

The Gorey family plot in Ashley Road Cemetary
The Gorey family plot in Ashley Road Cemetary
Image Courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

The St. Martin's church Roll of Honour states that:
FRED GOREY, was gassed in France and died at Cardiff on the 5th September 1918. He was buried in Epsom Cemetery.
Fred was a member of the Wellington Branch of the Ancient Order of Foresters and was commemorated on their, now lost, memorial.

EP SM BEC AOF

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GOREY Henry, Private. 60138.

101 Company Labour Corps.
Died of Wounds 19 May 1918, aged 39.

Henry Gorey's inscription in Ashley Road Cemetary
Henry Gorey's inscription in Ashley Road Cemetary
Image Courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

Henry Gorey was born in 1878 (GRO reference: Dec 1878 Epsom 2a 19) to William James and Eliza Gorey (nee Jurd). Henry's parents married in 1873 in the Fareham registration district.

HENRY GOREY AND HIS SIBLINGS
Name Born - Died Notes
William James Born: 1874 Epsom
Died: 1928
Buried Epsom Cemetery (F205A) 18 October 1928
George Born: 1876 Epsom Baptised 8 October 1876 St. Martins, Epsom
Henry Born: 1878 Epsom
Died: 19 May 1918
Baptised 19 February 1879 Christ Church Epsom
Fred Born: 1880 Epsom
Died: 5 September 1918
Baptised 3 March 1881 Christ Church, Epsom

In the 1881 census the family lived at 34 Adelphi Road, Epsom. Henry's father was a 39 year old railway porter. His mother Eliza was 38. Henry had three brothers, William James aged 6, George aged 4, and Fred aged 2. Fred was also a victim of the Great War, and died of wounds in the same incident that killed Henry.

34 Adelphi Road, Epsom
34 Adelphi Road, Epsom
Image Courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

By the 1891 census they still lived at 34 Adelphi Road, but Eliza, now a widow was head of the family, William James having died aged 41 on 29 July 1882. His headstone states "WILLIAM JAMES GOREY who met his death in the midst of his duty". Eliza, was employed as a laundress working at a laundry. The oldest son William was a baker, George was a general labourer, Henry or Harry an errand boy, and Fred was still at school.

In 1901, 34 Adelphi Road remained their address. Eliza, now 56 was still a laundress, but was self employed working at home. George was a plumber, whilst Harry and Fred were both bricklayers labourers.

When the 1911 census was taken Henry was working as a bricklayer's labourer and was living at the same address, with just his widowed mother. Henry's brother William James was a Sergeant with the Metropolitan Police, boarding at 10 Clarks Buildings, London. Brother George, a jobbing plumber, and his wife Daisy, of three years, were living with Daisy's parents at 24 Miles Road, Epsom. Brother Fred was a general labourer for the LCC and was a boarder with the Odd family, living at 4 Albert Villas, Bexley, Kent.

On 23 March 1916 Henry was medically examined at Kingston-on-Thames barracks. He was 5 feet 7 inches tall, weighed 162 lbs had good physical development and an expanded chest measurement of 40 inches, with a range of 2½ inches. His eyesight was less than perfect, with each eye rated at 6/9.

Henry was accepted, at Hounslow Barracks, by the Royal Fusiliers, on 27 March 1916 and having stated a preference to join a 'Navvy Battalion' he was duly sent to the 34th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, a labour Battalion, which was formed at Falmer, near Brighton in May and June 1916.

Soon after enrolling, on 7 May 1916 Henry embarked from Southampton and arrived at Havre, France the next day.

On 14 May 1917 the 34th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers was re-designated as the 101st Company Labour Corps. Men from the Labour Corps undertook any labouring task required of them. The built and maintained roads, railways and defences, buried the dead, and moved stores and ammunition. They laboured in quarries and forests, guarded prisoners and directed traffic.

On the night of 14 May 1918, the 101st Labour Company were laying cables in the Fonquevillers (Somme) area when they were attacked by German gas shells. Three officers and 136 men were killed and a further 130 wounded by the gas. Harry, who died of wounds on 19 May 1918 was one of those wounded on 14 May. The same attack killed his brother Fred who is buried in Epsom Cemetery, Ashley Road.

The Labour Corps were not front line fighting infantry, but their job must have been very dangerous as they often worked near the front line within easy range of German artillery. Soldiers Died CD tells us that between 11 May 1918 and 5 September 1918, 1031 men from the various Labour Corps Companies died.

Henry is buried in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen.

Henry's headstone in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen
Henry's headstone in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2009

The following appeared in the 24 May 1918 edition of the Epsom Advertiser:
SOLDIER BROTHERS GASSED. - Mrs. Gorey, 34, Adelphi Road, has received the bad news that one of her sons, Pte. Harry Gorey (39) has died in France from gas poisoning, and that another son, Pte. F. Gorey (37) is seriously ill also in consequence of gas poisoning. The two brothers were working in the same Labour Company when they were gassed. Before they joined the Army two years ago they were working in this district as bricklayers' labourers.
Henry's mother signed a receipt for his British War medal and Victory medal, engraved for the Royal Fusiliers.

The St. Martin's church Roll of Honour states that:
His brother HENRY GOREY, also died of gas poisoning in France on the 19th May 1918, and was buried in St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen.
Henry was a member of the Wellington Branch of the Ancient Order of Foresters and was commemorated on their, now lost, memorial. He is also remembered on his parents' and brother Fred's headstone in Epsom Cemetery, plot C251.

EP SM PG AOF

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GRELLIER Gordon Harley, 2nd Lieutenant

51st Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery.
Killed in Action 31 October 1918, aged 33.

Gordon Harley Grellier
Gordon Harley Grellier
Image courtesy of Epsom College, photo by Clive Gilbert © 2012

Gordon was born on 16 March 1885 (GRO reference: June 1885 Epsom 2a 16 ) at Downside, Epsom, the eldest son of Mr Harley Mair Grellier and his wife Edith Louisa. His birth was announced in the Times.

In 1891 the family lived at Downside, St Martin's Road, Epsom. Harley Grellier was a 40 year old surveyor. His wife, Edith Louisa, was 38. Their eldest child, Alice Maude was 7 years old and had been born in the little village of Worth in Sussex. Gordon was 6, Norman and Bernard, identical twins, were 4, Florence was 2 and Cecil was 7 months old. Grandmother, Ann Grellier aged 76 also lived with them and they employed a cook, a nurse and a housemaid.

In 1901 Alice was not at home but the other children and grandmother Ann were still living with Harley and Edith at Downside, Epsom. Another daughter, Eva , had been born. Harley was still a surveyor. No servants were recorded living in the house.

GORDON HARLEY GRELLIER AND HIS SIBLINGS
Name Born - Died Notes
Alice Maud Born: 1883 turners Hill
Died: 1930 Epsom
 
Gordon Harley Born: 16 March 1885 Epsom
Baptised 8 April 1885
Died: 31 October 1918 France
Surveyor & estate agent
Norman Born: 1886 Epsom
Baptised 4 December 1886
Dentist & medical student Awarded a MC
Bernard Born: 1886 Epsom
Baptised 4 December 1886
Dentist & medical student Awarded a MC
Florence Marianne Born: 1888 Epsom
Baptised 24 November 1888
Married William Vincent,
KIA 26 March 1917 Palestine
Cecil Born: 1890 Epsom
Baptised 2 September 1890
Architectural student Awarded 'White Eagle of Servia'
Eva Mary Born: 1892 Epsom
Baptised 9 May 1892
Died: 1945 Epsom
 

In 1911 the family lived at St Martin's croft, Epsom. Gordon's father was a surveyor and estate agent, as was Gordon. His mother stated that she had given birth to seven children and that they were all still living. Seventeen year old Randall Evelyn Hunt was a visitor, and the family employed two servants, a cook and a housemaid.

Gordon (and his twin brothers) attended Epsom College for five years, where he served in the school Cadet Corps from 1900. In 1905 he went to Wye Agricultural College until 1908 where he was awarded the diploma and Surveying prize. He became a pupil of Tristram Eve of JR Eve and Sons, Surveyors, after which he became a partner in the firm of Messrs Grelliers, surveyors in Queen Anne's gate, London. He was a professional associate of and qualified for a fellowship of the Surveyors Institute Great George St London. He was living at 6 Queen Anne's Gate, London.

Before the war he had joined the Inns of Court OTC on 9 March 1909 as Private 354, but he had to retire in May 1910 for a business engagement. He signed up for the duration of the war on 14 November 1916, enlisting at Kingston on Thames, and was appointed Gunner no 625471 in the HAC Siege Battery on 15 November 1916. His enrolment papers record that he was 31 yrs and 8mths old, 5ft 7 7/8ins in height, 36 ins chest with 3½in expansion, he weighed 138lbs, had a vaccination mark on his left arm and had good physical development.

Although he had married to Viva Melicent Hamley, daughter of Mr and Mrs ET Hamley of Sunning Hill Epsom at St Martin's church, Epsom on 4 July 1912 (GRO reference: Sep 1912 Epsom 2a 41) and supplied her name as his next of kin, he said that her whereabouts were unknown. They did not have any children.

Whilst in the HAC he served at home:
15 November 1916 - 309 Siege Battery as a gunner
9 December1916 - 30/A Depot
31 Mar 1917 - 309(Res) HAC Siege Battery
4 April 1917-2 June 1916 - Reinforcing Siege Depot at Stowlangtoft, Catterick
26 October1917 - Trowbridge

In December 1916 he had three vaccinations. Early in 1917 he experienced trouble with his right knee and spent from 11 Mar to 15 May 1917 in Horton War hospital. An x-ray on 17 March showed contusion. Whilst in hospital the tragic news arrived that 2nd Lt William Morris Vincent, husband of his sister Florence, had been killed. William is also remembered on the Ashley Road memorial.

He obtained a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the RGA serving in the 51st Seige Battery Royal Garrison Artillery and was formally discharged as a gunner on 17 Mar 1918. He attended the Royal Artillery Cadet School. On 24 October 1918 he embarked at Southampton, arriving the next day at Havre. He went up to the front, east of Cambrai on 30 October but was killed instantly by a shell splinter the next day, only hours after his arrival. He was 33.

He was buried, in Plot II B 22 Poix du Nord Communal cemetery extension, France. He is listed on the Ashley Road, Epsom, the Epsom College and St Martin's Epsom Memorials, and also on the Wye SE Agricultural College War Memorial. Appears in Agricola Magazine Vol 3. To be investigated

Gordon's Headstone in the Poix du Nord Communal cemetery extension
Gordon's Headstone in the Poix du Nord Communal cemetery extension, France
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2012

Gordon's effects included: a wallet, purse chain, wrist watch, pocket torch, pocket knife, cigarette case, cigarette holder, officer's advance book, cheque book, army book 439, a pair of gloves, pair of shoes, 4 large buttons, 6 small buttons, khaki handkerchief, tie pin pencils and keys. The probate for his estate had been granted to his father but unfortunately he died of pneumonia at St Martins Croft Epsom on 19 November 1921 and his brothers had to administer the probate for their father and the remaining estate of Gordon. His estate was valued at £2429. It is interesting to note that his twin brothers, Norman and Bernard, joined the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) in 1915, and were each awarded the Military Cross for gallantry. His youngest brother, Cecil, also served and was wounded at Suvla Bay. He received the White Eagle of Servia for his part in the fighting of Autumn 1915 in Servia.

Close up of the inscription for Gellier
Grellier's Headstone next to the one for his parents
Grellier's Headstone next to the one for his parents
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2008

Gordon's father, Harley, was the Chairman of St Martin's Church War Memorial Committee, and lived to see the memorial unveiled on Sunday 12 June 1921 although died later in the year at the age of 70.

The St Martin's church Roll of Honour states that:
GORDON HARLEY GRELLIER, was killed in action on 31st October 1918 at Poix du Nord where he was buried. His home during nearly the whole of his life was in Epsom where he was born and at school. He was a Sidesman of this church.
Gordon was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory medal.

The CWGC states that Gordon was the son of Harley Mair Grellier and Edith Louisa Grellier of St Martin's Croft, Epsom.

EP COL SM

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GRINTER George Henry, Bandmaster. 9483.

King's Royal Rifle Corps (KRRC).
Died 18 June 1919 aged 49.

George's Headstone in Epsom Cemetery
George's Headstone in Epsom Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2014

George Henry Grinter was born in Aldershot in 1870 (GRO reference: June 1870 Farnham 2a 82). He was not named at the time, so was registered 'male'. George's parents, Henry Grinter from Somerset and Carmela Singers from Malta, were married on 25 July 1863 in Malta. They had twelve children.

GEORGE HENRY GRINTER AND HIS SIBLINGS
Name Born - Died Notes
William Samuel Born: 1866 Montreal, Canada
Died: 19 January 1916 Epsom
Buried with his parents in grave H137A Epsom Cemetery
Caroline Elizabeth Born: 1868 Leeds  
George Henry Born: 1870 Aldershot
Died: 18 June 1919 Epsom
 
Albert Robert Born: 1874 Umballa, India
Died: 1940 Ewell
Buried in grave G479 Epsom Cemetery on 15 April 1940
Rose Helena Born: 1876 Umballa, India  
Charles Joseph Born: 1877 Ghareal, India  
Harriet L Born: 1880 Rawlpindi, India  
Herbert Born: 1884 Winchester No birth reference found
Mary Ann Born: 1888 Epsom (census) The only birth reference found is for Swansea, Sep 1888
Unknown, died before 1911
Unknown, died before 1911
Unknown, died before 1911

In the 1871 census George's father was a 31 year old Private soldier, serving with the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade at the District Camp, Cheriton, Kent. His 24 year old mother was recorded as Caroline and two older siblings had been born, William Samuel aged 5 and Caroline Elizabeth aged 3. George Henry aged 11 months was recorded as Henry.

I have been unable to find the family in the UK 1881 census.

In 1891 the family lived at Maria Cottages, Epsom Common. George's father had retired from the Army and was working as a farm labourer. His mother was a laundress. Six more siblings are recorded Albert aged 17, Rose aged 16, Charles aged 14, Harriet aged 7 and Mary aged 2. I have been unable to find George in the census but his pension record tells us that he was in India at the time.

George married Mary McCabe, born in Barbados, in Hounslow on 26 December 1899. On census night 1901 they were living at 3 St. Leonard's Villas, Heston, Hounslow. George is described as a 'Bandmaster infantry'. George's parents and siblings Herbert aged 17 and Mary aged 12 were living at 'White Cottage', Epsom Common.

George and Mary's only child, daughter Mary Caroline, was born on 26 August 1901 in Hounslow.

The 1911 census records George as a 43 year old 'Bandmaster', with the 4th Battalion KRRC in India, whilst his wife and daughter were at Georgetown Barracks, Barbados. His parents now lived alone at 'White Cottage'. His father was a 71 year old 'Army Pensioner (Gardener Domestic)'. His 65 year old mother recorded that her marriage had lasted 47 years and that nine of her 12 children were still living.

Some of George's service papers have survived and although difficult to read, information obtained from then follows.

George first attested on 14 April 1882 in Kasauli, India, into the Prince of Wales Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians). He stated that he had been born in Aldershot and that he was 14 years and 3 months old, adding a couple of years to his age as he would have only been about 12.

On 15 April 1882 he was examined and on the form it was noted that his, 'Age physically equivalent to', was 14 years. He was 4 feet 9 inches tall, weighed 76 lbs, had a chest measurement of 27 inches, a fair complexion, hazel eyes, brown hair and he was a Roman Catholic.

George's 'Military History' form reads as follows:

Posting From To
East Indies 14 April 1882 13 January 1895
Home 14 January 1895 6 February 1900
West Indies 07 February 1900 19 November 1900
Home 20 November 1900 03 May 1901
West Indies 04 May 1901 23 July 1901
Home 24 July 1901 27 September 1901
West Indies 28 September 1901 19 February 1903
West Africa 20 February 1903 29 March 1904
Home 30 March 1904 02 November 1904
En route to wea 03 November 1904 16 November 1904
West Africa 17 November 1904 06 May 1905
Home 07 May 1905 15 September 1905
En route to wea 16 September 1905 25 September 1905
West Africa 26 September 1905 22 December 1905
West Indies 23 December 1905 30 December 1908
On voyage 31 December 1908 15 January 1909
West Africa 16 January 1909 11 June 1909
On voyage 12 June 1909 22 June 1909
Home 23 June 1909 30 November 1909
India 01 December 1909 13 April 1912

George attended the Royal Military School of Music in n1898-9, and he had a first class Certificate of Education and was awarded a Long Service and Good Conduct medal at the Delhi Coronation Durbar of 1911.

After 30 years qualifying service for pension, on 13 April 1912, at Rawalpindi, India, Bandmaster Henry Grinter, No. 9483, 4th Battalion KRRC, was discharged from the Army. His intended place of residence was Vanhage Lodge, Station Road, Lucknow, India. His conduct and character whilst serving was described as exemplary.

He completed another attestation form on 14 January 1915 at Bareilly, India, this time giving his age as 44 years and 8 months. He stated that he was married, a musician, he was a volunteer on the Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway, and that he had previously served in the Army and was an Army pensioner. Although his original unit, the 4th Battalion KRRC, was noted on the form, he joined the 1/4th Battalion Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry (DCLI).

On 14 January 1915 he was examined and this time on the form it was noted that his 'Apparent age', was 44 years. He was 6 feet 1½ inches tall, weighed 155 lbs, had a chest measurement of 39½ inches with an expansion of 2¼ inches, a good complexion, greyish brown eyes, hair turning grey and he was a Roman Catholic.

In less than a year, on 31 December 1915, George was discharged from the Army, his services being no longer required and he was issued 'Silver War Badge' No. 69133. Again his conduct and character were described as exemplary, and it was noted that He is a very good Bandmaster and a good disciplinarian. Thoroughly reliable in every way.

George died in the Cottage Hospital, Epsom on 18 June 1919 and was buried on 21 June in Epsom Cemetery in grave H139A, which is marked by a Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone.

As George's surviving service papers show that he left the Army on 31 December 1915 because his services were no longer required, it seems odd that he has a Commission headstone, whereas others who died after leaving the Army do not have a Commission headstone and are not remembered in the website.

For his service with the DCLI, No. 4608, Bandmaster and Warrant Officer 1, George Henry Grinter was awarded the British War medal.

George's widow, of 7 Woodcote Side-terrace, Epsom, was granted probate on 12 July 1919 in the sum of £954 8s.5d.

BEC

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GRUCHY John Ernest, Lance Corporal. 510039.

14th Battalion London Regiment (London Scottish).
Prisoner of War, aged 26.

John Ernest Gruchy was born in Cirencester in 1888 (GRO reference: Dec 1888 Cirencester 6a 347) to Walter John and Lilie Jane Gruchy.

John signed up with the London Scottish at Buckingham Gate as a volunteer into the Territorial Force in 1908. He, like every other London Scottish volunteer would have paid his annual £1 subscription to join, and he was given the pre-war number of 758.

On Tuesday 15 September 1914, on a fine bright day John marched with the Battalion to Watford to entrain for Southampton. The Battalion embarked from Southampton in the afternoon and arrived at Le Havre soon after dawn on the 16 September, just one month after they left London for their training.

The first battle of Ypres commenced on 20 October 1914, and towards the end of October it appeared that the Germans might break through the line. Every available man was to be sent forward as quickly as possible to stem the tide. The London Scottish were duly rushed forward in thirty four London motor busses, and became the first Territorials to engage the enemy in the Great War. They paraded at 8am on 30 October outside the famous Cloth Hall that was to become completely destroyed, but at this stage was intact. The next day, 31 October was Halloween, a festival day for Scotland. It was on Halloween that the London Scottish had their first bloody encounter with the Germans on the Messines Ridge. The battle continued throughout the night and into the next day 1 November. They stopped the attack and thus kept the line intact, stopping what might have been a dangerous enemy breakthrough. But they had suffered loosing 85 men killed in action, and an unspecified number wounded or taken prisoner.

The following appeared in the Epsom Advertiser dated 15 January 1915:
EPSOM BANK CLERK KILLED IN ACTION.----Among those who took part in the famous charge of the London Scottish was Lance-Corporal J.E.A. Gruchy, who was engaged as a clerk at the Epsom branch of the London County and Westminster Bank. He was reported as missing, and as nothing has been heard of him it is feared that he must have been killed. According to the story of one of his more fortunate comrades he was wounded and removed to a haystack, where he was afterwards bayoneted by a German. Lance-Corpl.Gruchy had been in Epsom for 12 months, his home being in Stamford Hill, and was quite a young man.
However, his medal card tells us that he was a 'P of W'. It also tells us that he was awarded the 1914 star, British War medal and the Victory Medal. So, fortunately news of his death was much exaggerated, and he therefore does not appear on any of he Borough's war memorials.

John's Medal Card
John's medal card.
Image courtesy of Ancestry.co.uk (Link opens in a new window)
Ancestry Logo

With thanks to Ajax Bardrick for supplying additional information.

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GRUNDTVIG Humphrey Halgrim MC, Lieutenant.

11th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment.
Died of Wounds 22 March 1918, aged 21.

Humphrey Halgrim Grundtvig
Humphrey Halgrim Grundtvig
Image Source: Harrow Roll of Honour

Humphrey Halgrim Grundtvig was born on 24 July 1896 (GRO reference: Epsom Sep 1896 2a 20) to Herbert Theodore and Norah Grundtvig (nee Forde).

In 1901 the family lived in Maidstone House, Epsom. Humphrey's father Herbert was a 32 year old solicitor who had been born in Brazil and became a naturalised British subject. His mother Norah was 36 and had been born in Wimbledon. Humphrey was an only child. On census night Norah had two of her siblings staying. Winifred Brownlow Foster, a 27 year old widow, and Thomas Arthur Head Forde, a 43 year old civil engineer. The family employed a cook and a housemaid.

Maidstone Lodge in May 1968
Maidstone Lodge photographed in in May 1968 by LR James.
Image courtesy of Surrey Libraries and is held in the
Epsom & Ewell Local And Family History Centre Collection

In 1911, 14 year old Humphrey attended Harrow College and was a boarder at 'The Druries', High Street, Harrow-on-the-Hill. Still living at Maidstone House, his father was described as a 44 year old retired solicitor and his mother was aged 46. They employed two servants.

Humphrey was educated at Suffield Park School Cromer and Harrow . He entered the Inns of Court O.T.C. at Stone buildings, Lincolns Inn Fields on 6 October 1914. He was 19 years and 3 months old, 5ft9½ ins tall, had a 35½ in chest with a 3in expansion, and weighed 136lbs. He had 6/12 vision in both eyes without his glasses and 6/6 with them. He was Gazetted to the Berkshire Regiment in October 1914, serving as a Private from joining up until he took up his commission on 25 November. He transferred to the Leicestershire Regiment (Pioneers) D company on 30 June 1916. His name appears on page 6828 of the 'Supplement to the London Gazette, 8 July, 1916'.

He went to the front on 14 May 1916, but was admitted to 9 Stationary Hospital at Boulogne on 22 Aug with trench fever and invalided home on 24 August, travelling back to Folkestone on a Belgian ship ("Stad A…."). Then followed a long convalescence because the fever increased his heart rate particularly with any exertion and made him very anaemic. He spent a month in bed suffering pyrexia, aching pains, headaches and insomnia. He was eventually fit enough for light, home duty towards the end of the year and was able to return to duty at Wingstead Camp Patrington Yorkshire on 3 March 1917 following a medical board at Horton Military Hospital. He rejoined D Coy 11 Battalion Leicestershire Regiment in March. His name also appears in the 'Supplement to the London Gazette, 1 January, 1918', announcing his award of the MC. in the1918 New Year Honours list for his conduct when a truck of ammunition on a light railway was derailed and set on fire by a shell. He and the CSM P Stabler who received the DCM quietly collected a few men and unloaded the truck under great personal danger

The 11th Battalion Leicester regiment was a pioneer battalion attached to the 6th Division. On 21 March 1918 the Division was holding the line around Lagnicourt, about 12 miles west of Cambrai. The 21 March 1918 saw the start of the long expected all out German offensive, 'The Kaiser's Battle', the last desperate gamble to win before the Americans arrived in force. As dawn broke and under the cover of a thick mist the German assault began. On 21 March 1 officer and 18 other ranks (OR) were killed. The 22 March saw 3 officers killed, and 47 ORs killed. Humphrey died in Number 3 Casualty clearing station on 22 March, of gunshot wounds received in his back, believed to have been received the day before although his file (WO 339/1696) does not give a precise date. He was buried in Grevillers British Cemetery, grave II A 15, west of Baupaume, where he still lies.

Probate was granted to his father in September 1918, and his effects were valued at £276 5s 3d (app £275 25p).

Humphrey Grundtvig's headstone in the Grevillers British Cemetery
Humphrey Grundtvig's headstone in the Grevillers British Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert ©2008

It seems that his family worshiped at two local churches, his name appearing on the St Martin's memorial as well as the Christ Church memorial. The original wooden cross that marked his grave is on display at St Martin's. The original wooden crosses were replaced by the familiar Portland stone slabs. Relatives were allowed to have the wooden crosses if they so desired.

The original wooden cross that marked Grundtvig's grave is on display at St Martin's Church.
The original wooden cross that marked Grundtvig's
grave is on display at St Martin's Church.
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2007

The St Martin's church Roll of Honour states that:
HUMPHREY HALGRIM GRUNDTVIG, was mortally wounded in action and died the next day, 22nd March 1918, at Grévillers where he was buried. He was awarded the Military Cross.

Humphrey's mother was born in Wimbledon and as Humphrey is commemorated on the Putney Vale memorial, their links with Wimbledon must have continued after moving to Epsom. Note: His name on the memorial is incorrectly spelt Grundting, but is spelt correctly in the website quoted above.

Humphrey's memorial plaque in St. Mary's Church, Wimbledon.
Humphrey's memorial plaque in St. Mary's Church, Wimbledon
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2014

He is also remembered on a plaque in the Church of the Good Shepherd, Shoreham, although we have not identified his connection with the area.

In addition to the Military Cross, Humphrey was awarded the British War medal and the Victory Medal.

The following article appeared in the Epsom Advertiser dated 7 July 1922:
SACRILEGE. DESPICABLE THEFT IN EPSOM CHURCH. A despicable theft was committed in Christ Church, Epsom on Saturday. Someone entered the church and removed a beautiful altar cross of mother of pearl from the memorial chapel. The cross was of considerable value and was erected by Mr and Mrs H.T. Grundtvig in memory of their son who was killed in the war.

Humphrey's father Herbert died on 5 August 1930, and probate of £30,247 18s 9d, was granted to Norah.

EP SM CC Harrow roll of honour, Putney Vale.

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GUYTON Albert James, Ordinary Seaman. J/24703.

Royal Navy. H.M.S. Invincible.
Killed in Action 31 May 1916, aged 18.

Albert Guyton
Albert Guyton
Image courtesy of Jonathan Wright © 2010

Albert James Guyton was born in Portsmouth Hampshire on 1 January 1898 (GRO: Mar 1898 Portsea 2b 484), the eldest son of Albert James and Louisa Laura Guyton (nee Popay). His parents had married in 1896 in Yarmouth Norfolk.

Albert's parents Albert and Louisa
Albert's parents Albert and Louisa
Image courtesy of Jonathan Wright © 2010

In the 1901 census the family lived at 48, Tollan Street, Portsmouth. Albert's father was a 30 year old Royal Marine. His mother was aged 25, and he had two younger siblings, Giffer Lucy aged 2 (named after her maternal grandmother) and newly born Norman Martin.

Albert with his sister Giffer
Albert with his sister Giffer
Image courtesy of Jonathan Wright © 2010

Albert's parents divorced in 1903, and his mother Louisa remarried in 1905 to George Myland Monery. We believe she had several more children with her new husband. She died in 1955. His father had served on Ascension Island, (which had a Royal Marine Garrison from 1823 to 1922) before being drafted into the London Recruitment Office. He was later drafted to the Norwich Recruitment Office where he finished his time with the marines and where the family eventually settled.

Albert James senior appeared on the 1911 census as a 40 year old "widower". He was a Colour Sergeant in the Royal Marine Artillery, living at 7, Whitehall Place S.W. His two younger children Giffer and Norman were living with their uncle Robert Guyton in Norfolk, while Albert, now aged 13, was a pupil at the Royal Naval College, Romney Road, Greenwich.

Exactly when the Guyton family moved to Worcester Park and became members of St Mary's church Cuddington is unknown.

Albert followed his father into the Royal Navy signing up for 12 years, on 19 May 1913, aged 15, with the Naval rank of Boy II. At the time he was 5 feet ½ inch tall, had a chest measurement of 31½ inches, a dark complexion, brown hair and brown eyes. Until 19 May 1914 he served in HMS Ganges, a shore based training establishment, and obtained the rank Boy I. He then served in a number of Naval establishments as follows:

Royal Arthur 2 October 1914 to 2 August 1914
Pembroke I 3 August 1914 to 16 September 1914
AMC Edinburgh Castle 17 September 1914 to 9 January 1915
Victory I 10 January 1915 to 27 March 1915
Invincible 28 March 1915 to 31 May 1916

Albert was promoted Ordinary Seaman on 1 July 1915.

Albert James Guyton, aged 18, was killed in action at Jutland on 31 May 1916 when H.M.S. "Invincible" was sunk in the Battle of Jutland.

Extract from the Official History; "Naval Operations" by Sir Julian S. Corbett. 1923

H.M.S. Invincible
Jutland Bank, 31st May 1916.
.................At 6.32 Admiral Beatty reached his station ahead of the battle fleet. Ahead of him again was Admiral Hood with his three battle cruisers, leading the fleet, and leading it in a manner worthy of the honoured name he bore. Upon him was concentrated the fire of three or four of Admiral Hipper's five ships. Under pressure of the oncoming British Dreadnoughts they had turned again to the southward. For the past ten minutes the action between them and the " Invincibles " had been growing hot upon similar courses, and Admiral Hood with Captain A. L. Cay, his flag-captain, at his side was directing it from the bridge. Having the advantage of the light he was giving more than he received. The range was down below 9,000 yards, but it was the greatest that visibility would permit, and he was doing too well to alter. " Several shells," says Commander von Hase of the Derfflinger, " pierced our ship with a terrific force and exploded with a tremendous roar which shook every seam and rivet. The captain had again frequently to steer the ship out of the line to get clear of the hail of fire." So heavy was the punishment he was inflicting that Admiral Hood hailed Commander Dannreuther, his gunnery officer, in the control top, and called to him, " Your firing is very good. Keep at it as quickly as you can. Every shot is telling." They were the last words he is known to have spoken. Just then the mist was riven and from the Derfflinger her tormentor was suddenly silhouetted against a light patch of sky. Then as another salvo from the Invincible straddled her she began rapid salvoes in reply, in which probably the Konig joined with as many. One after another they went home on the Invincible. Flames shot up from the gallant flagship, and there came again the awful spectacle of a fiery burst, followed by a huge column of dark smoke which, mottled with blackened debris, swelled up hundreds of feet in the air, and the mother of all battle cruisers had gone to join the other two that were no more. As her two consorts swerved round her seething death-bed they could see she was rent in two; her stem and stern rose apart high out of the troubled waters as though she had touched the bottom, and near by a group of half a dozen men were clinging to a life raft, cheering the ships as they raced by to continue the fight. So in the highest exultation of battle-doing all a man could do for victory-the intrepid Admiral met his end, gilding in his death with new lustre the immortal name of Hood............
Albert is commemorated on the St Mary's Church, Cuddington memorial, and on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Southsea Common overlooking the promenade.

Albert's inscription on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial
Albert's inscription on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2011

Albert James' sister, Giffer lived to be 108 years old, dying in 2007, a week short of her 109th birthday. Permission to use photos kindly given by Giffer's great grandson, Jonathan Wright.

SMC

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