WW2 Book of Remembrance - Surnames P

Index

Click on the name to jump to the relevant entry
[Content]

PAGE, Brian Frederick Johns (Revised 27/11/2017)
PAGE, Walter (New 30/10/2017)
PAGE, Wilfrid Thomas (Ted) (New 30/10/2017)
PAGELLA, Maurice Rene (New 30/10/2017)
PAINTER, Mollie Laura Arnaud (New 08/01/2018)
PALMER, Frank (New 30/10/2017)
PAMMENT, Kenneth Jack (New 08/01/2018)
PANKHURST, Charles Arthur (New 08/01/2018)
PANTING, Dennis Brent (Revised 12/12/2017)
PARBERY, Robert George * (New 30/10/2017)
PARSONS, Maude (New 30/10/2017)
PASKELL, Reginald Derrick Frank (New 30/10/2017)
PAUL, Eric William (New 30/10/2017)
PAYNTER, Sydney (New 08/01/2018)
PEARSON, Nevill Corrie (New 03/02/2014)
PECK, Charles William (New 08/01/2018)
PEDDIE, Thomas John (Updated 24/08/2017)
PENDRY, Gordon (New 30/10/2017)
PENFOLD, Ernest John
PENFOLD, Harry
PENTNEY, Douglas Charles (New 08/01/2018)
PICKSTOCK, Cyril Albert (New 30/10/2017)
PILLEY, John Herbert (New 30/10/2017)
PONSFORD, Wallace Edward (New 08/01/2018)
POWELL, Eric Stanley (New 08/01/2018)
PRATT, Sidney Thomas (New 08/01/2018)
PRICE, Godfrey Ronald * (New 30/10/2017)
PRIOR, Elizabeth * (New 30/10/2017)
PULLING, Walter George (New 08/01/2018)
PULLINGER, William Todd (New 30/10/2017)
PURCELL, Allen Harold Dashwood * (Revised 19/11/2017)
PUTTICK, Wilfred * (Revised 08/01/2018)
PYE, Catherine * (New 30/10/2017)

* = Not included in the Book of Remembrance for reasons unknown.
If you are looking for someone whose name starts with a different letter please try:



Content


PAGE, Brian Frederick Johns. Sergeant/Pilot (538741)

42 Squadron, Royal Air Force.
Died 11 May 1942, aged 23.

The marriage of Randall William Tussand Page, born 1890 in Mendoza, South Africa, to Clara Jane Johns, born 1886, from Ruan Minor, Cornwall, was registered at Helston for the December Quarter of 1915. Birth of their son, Brian Frederick Johns Page, came to be recorded in Hampstead, 3/1919.

At that time and up to 1939 the family lived in Bolton Road, Camden.

The RAF Service number 538741allocated to Brian indicates that he entered service from civilian life rather than as a Boy Entrant about the age of sixteen.

The Pages seem to have left London to reside at 25 Beaufort Way, Ewell, following the outbreak of hostilities.

In common with certain other ranks, boy entrants, and former RAF apprentices, Brian was selected for air crew training during the war. Eventually he joined 42 Squadron as a Sergeant Pilot. On 11 May 1942, Beaufort AW 366 was engaged in a non-operational training day, engaged in formation flight light torpedo attacks, when it collided with AW310. AW366 crashed into the Firth of Forth, Scotland. Two of the crew of AW366 were killed and the other two lost at sea.

Crew:-
RAF Sgt B F J Page, Captain (Pilot)
RAAF 407899 Sgt J L Jones, (Observer)
RAF Sgt S Counsell, (Wireless Air Gunner)
RAF Sgt D MacDonald,(Wireless Air Gunner)
AIRCRAFT OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE 1939-1945: BRISTOL TYPE 152 BEAUFORT.
Bristol Beaufort Mk I of No. 42 Squadron RAF, based at Leuchar, March 1941.
Image source: © IWM (CH 2775)

A twin-engine large reconnaissance, torpedo bomber and mine-laying aircraft, the Beaufort's design was based on the Bristol Blenheim light bomber. For a time, they used two Taurus4-cylinder radial engines (or, sometimes, Pratt and Witney Twin Wasps). The aircraft could travel at about 260 mph (418 km/h), but the speed fell when carrying a torpedo. Carrying a crew of four, the Beaufort operated as the standard torpedo bomber between 1940 and 1943.

Sgt's. Page and Jones were buried in the Leuchars Cemetery, Fifeshire, Scotland. Sgt's .Counsell and MacDonald have no known grave and their names are commemorated on the Memorial to the missing, Runnymede, Surrey.

Brian's father, Randall William Page, died on 15 March 1944 in hospital at 49 Dorking Road Epsom. His widowed mother, Clara Jane Page, lived on at 25 Beaufort Way, Ewell, until her death, 7 December 1957, again in Epsom District Hospital.

Brian Bouchard © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PAGE, Walter

Civilian
Died 15 June 1944, aged 68

Walter was born on 28 August 1879, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Page, of Runcorn, Cheshire.

As noted in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission records, he had married Emily Winifred Page (some 20 years his junior, having been born on 20 April 1899). The 1939 Register finds the couple living with Post Office Sorter Albert George Cooks at 57 Riverholme Drive, Ewell. Walter's occupation is described as "Contractors Costing Clerk (unemployed)" and Winifred's as the conventional "Unpaid domestic duties".

Walter died at as a result of Enemy Action at 57 Riverholme Drive on 15 June 1944, and was buried in Epsom Cemetery (Grave O562) on 24 June.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PAGE, Wilfrid Thomas. Squadron Leader (65992)

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve 126 Squadron
Died 16 November 1943, aged 29

Wilfrid ('Tom') Page

Wilfrid ("Tom") Page

Wilfrid Thomas - always known as "Tom" - was born on 13 July 1914. He was the third of nine children born to William Richardson Page (the founder of Epsom's Page Motors) and Esther Olive (née Pohill).

In Q3 1920, he married Emma Edith Cox in Croydon. The couple were recorded in the 1939 Register living at 47 The Greenway, Epsom in a household of seven. Some of those individuals were doubtless the couple's children but their records are currently officially closed.

After leaving Epsom County School for Boys (now Glyn School), Tom became a test pilot with the Parnall aircraft company of Bristol. He joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in January 1938 as an Airman u/t Pilot and commenced training at the Scottish College of Aviation at Prestwick. In April that year he continued training nearer home at Redhill, going on to more advanced training near Bristol in May 1939.

Called up on 1 September 1939 as a Sergeant-Pilot, he was assessed as suitable for service as a bomber pilot and began training on multi-engine aircraft. On 31 July 1940, he was posted to 11 OTU Bassingbourn to convert to Wellington bombers. At about this time, however, Fighter Command was seeking volunteers from other Commands and Tom must have responded to this since, on 2 September 1940, he went to 5 OTU Aston Down to train on Hurricanes. He "passed out" on 29 September and was posted to 1 Squadron to begin operations.

Proud of his home town, he was granted the Council's permission to paint the Epsom and Ewell coat of arms on his Hawker Hurricane.

Tom with his Hurricane bearing the Epsom and Ewell coat of arms
Tom with his Hurricane bearing the Epsom and Ewell coat of arms

In May 1941, he was commissioned as a Flight Lieutenant and posted to 59 OTU at Crosby-on-Eden, Cumbria as an instructor. However, he was back on operations in December that year, serving with 32 Squadron at RAF Manston as Flight Commander of 'B' Flight. He was awarded a "Mention in Despatches" for distinguished service with the Squadron.

In March 1942, Tom was promoted to Squadron Leader and, in May, was posted to the newly-formed 174 (Mauritius) Squadron, also at RAF Manston. The Squadron was equipped with the Hurricane II 'Hurribomber', adapted to carry bombs, and engaged in anti-shipping and dive-bombing operations along the French coast.

In a 1942 newspaper report, Tom described a low-level Hurricane raid on German positions in Normandy, in which he had taken part. He said,
'After crossing the French coast navigation was difficult because of the haze, but we found the German camp all right. Light machine-guns opened fire from the ground, but I replied with my guns, and the firing stopped at once. I still had my finger on the gun button when I let my bombs go and none of us was more than 30 ft high when bombing. Then I turned so that I could not look back and when I had counted off the second allowed by our delayed action bombs there were terrific explosions. Smoke, dust and debris rose to a height of 200 ft or more, and it looked as though the whole camp had been blown sky high. We made quite a mess of it. It was a beautifully planned show and, except for one small bullet hole in my Hurricane, not one of our aircraft was hit. On the way back we saw our Spitfire escorts beating up other targets. They did some particularly good shooting on a goods train. It came towards them head-on and they fired down the whole length of it.'
After his tour with 174 Squadron, Tom resumed instructing duties at 56 OTU Tealing, near Dundee. His next posting, in June 1943, involved him converting to Spitfires and going to command 126 Squadron at Safi on Malta, then operating offensive sweeps over the Mediterranean.

SupermarineSpitfireMkVc
Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vc, AR501, G-AWII, filming Battle of Britain, 1969
Image source Flickr

Following the invasion of Sicily the Squadron moved to Gerbini airfield there, arriving in October 1943. As the Germans retreated the Squadron moved the following month to Grottaglie airfield in the heel of Italy.

On 16 November 1943, Tom was in his Spitfire Vc JK950 leading the Squadron on an operation over modern-day Cerma-Bicak in Albania. What happened next was described in the Group Captain's 21 November letter of condolence to Tom's widow, the full text of which is as below.
"My dear Mrs Page

"I want to try to convey to use some of the sympathy that we here feel for you and yours in your loss. Your husband was one of the most respected of Squadron Commanders and all those under his Command have been most deeply affected.

"I can tell you that he was leading his Squadron in offensive operations at the time, and that his aircraft was hit by flak. He was not in anyway injured himself and decided that he would try and get his aircraft back.

"This was a noble decision as he could so easily have crash landed and fallen into enemy hands. While over the sea, his engine finally up and he had to bail out; if this had been successful we could probably have rescued him but once more Fate seems to have taken at hand and he was seen to have difficulty getting clear of his aircraft.

"He was clear before they both hit the sea but his parachute, while it had started to open, had not time to check his fall and the impact must have killed him instantaneously.

"As I say, his loss is a grievous one to us all, and especially to his Squadron, but this only heightens our sympathies for you. I hope what I have been able to tell you will be some comfort to you and if they should be anything further I can do to help, I hope you will not hesitate to let me know."
Tom's body was never recovered and he is commemorated on the Malta War Memorial. Unveiled by HM The Queen on 3 May 1954, this commemorates almost 2,300 airmen who lost their lives during WW2 (whilst serving with the Commonwealth Air Forces flying from bases in Austria, Italy, Sicily, islands of the Adriatic and Mediterranean, Malta, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, West Africa, Yugoslavia and Gibraltar) and who have no known grave.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PAGELLA, Maurice Rene. Major OBE

HMS Nile, Royal Marines
Died 19 September 1945, aged 37

Son of Francesco and Josephine Emily Eugene Pagella.

HMS Nile was, between April 1939 and June 1946, not a ship but the Royal Navy base at Ras el-Tin Point, Alexandria, Egypt. Among others, special forces operated from this base, and a flavour of Maurice Pagella's war may be gleaned from the citation in the London Gazette of 19 June 1945 for his appointment to the Military Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, namely:- "For courage, skill and inspiring leadership in special operations following the Italian Armistice".

Maurice's death came after the cessation of hostilities and it is understood that, after several years in harm's way, the rather mundane cause was a road accident. He is buried in the Milan War Cemetery, Italy.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PAINTER, Mollie Laura Arnaud. Sister

Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service
Died 5 July 1941 Age 36

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Daughter of Lt.-Col. George Evelyn Painter, formerly of the Royal Engineers, and of Mary Josephine Painter (nee Murphy), of Epsom, Surrey.

Buried: Madras War Cemetery, Chennai, 8. A. 13.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PALMER, Frank

Royal Navy
Died N/K, aged N/K

Details unclear

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lists only three WW2 deaths of Royal Navy seamen called plain Frank Palmer. They - and their details are:
PALMER, Frank. Leading Stoker (P/KX136948). Served on HMS Lochinvar, Royal Navy.Died 5 June 1946, aged 22. Son of Philip and Alice Palmer, of Birmingham; husband of Lily Frances Palmer, of Small Heath, Birmingham.

PALMER, Frank. Stoker 1st Class (P/KX 91570). Served on HMS Hood, Royal Navy. Died 24 May 1941, aged 25. Son of Ernest David and Louisa Palmer, of Moss Side, Manchester.

PALMER, Frank. Able Seaman (C/SSX 27176). Served on HMS Niger, Royal Navy. Died 6 July 1942, aged 23. Son of Harry and Elizabeth Palmer, of Broadclyst, Devon.
The Commission has only three other Palmers with Frank as one of their Christian names (and has none called Francis). They are:
PALMER, Frank Ernest. Coder (C/JX 508410). Served on HMS Bullen, Royal Navy. Died 6 December 1944, aged 39. Son of Walter and Elizabeth Palmer; husband of Nora H. Palmer, of South Croydon, Surrey.

PALMER, Frank Reginald. Able Seaman (H2074). Served on HMAS Manoora, Royal Australian Naval Reserve. Died 8 July 1947, aged 24. Son of David John and Margaret Elizabeth Palmer; husband of Betty Patricia Palmer, of Lakemba, New South Wales.

PALMER, Frank Arthur Charles. Able Seaman (D/J 41748). Served on HMS Warwick, Royal Navy. Died 20 February 1944, aged N/K. No family details given.
Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PAMMENT, Kenneth Jack. Flight Lieutenant 108141

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 2 December 1944, aged 30

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Oscar Rokeby Pamment, born 1887, attended a private school in Cameron House, Church Street, Leatherhead, Surrey, during 1901.

His marriage to Lily Blanche Hare was registered at Norwich for the September Quarter of 1914. Birth of their son, Kenneth Jack Pamment came to be recorded in Lewisham, 9/1916.

By 1936, the family had arrived locally to reside at Hunston, Longdown Road, Epsom. Mr Pamment was mentioned in Hilda Andrews' 1940 Diary.

Kenneth Pamment enlisted with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve with a Service number 1281259 in September 1940, probably at Uxbridge. He was commissioned as a Pilot Officer, 1 September 1941, advancing to Flying Officer, 30 August 1942, and Flight Lieutenant on 30 August 1943.

The marriage of Kenneth J Pamment to Betty Waite is found to have been registered at Peterborough, 3/1944, followed by the birth of their daughter Kay Bettine Pamment, 6/1945.

A de Havilland DH.98, Mosquito NF.Mk XIII, HK 530, of 29 Squadron departed from RAF Hunsdon. Hertfordshire, for a night intrusion raid on Gutersloh, Germany, 2 December 1944, crewed by: -
F/Lt 108141 Kenneth Jack Pamment (pilot), RAFVR
Flight Sergeant H C Wiles (navigator)
The aircraft crashed near Werlte, about 80km SW Bremen, and Kenneth Pamment was killed. Sgt Wiles had been injured but survived and was admitted to a hospital in Bremen and taken Prisoner of War.

Reichswald Forest War Cemetery was created after the Second World War when burials were brought in from all over western Germany and is the largest Commonwealth cemetery in the country. Some of the airmen buried in the cemetery lost their lives in supporting the advance into Germany, but most died earlier in the war in the intensive air attacks over Germany. Their remains were re-interred from cemeteries and isolated sites in the surrounding area. K J Pamment lies in plot 4 G 12.

Kenneth's headstone in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery
Kenneth's headstone in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery
Photo by 'Des Philippet' via findagrave.com

Brian Bouchard © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PANKHURST, Charles Arthur. Sergeant 1260384

207 Sqdn. Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 24 May 1942 Age 35

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Thomas William Pankhurst, and of Flora Pankhurst, of Ewell, Surrey.

Buried: Buckland Monachorum Cemetery, Sec. R. 1. Grave 4.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PANTING, Dennis Brent. Flight Lieutenant/Pilot (114393)

104 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 16/17 April 1943, aged 28

On 12 April 1913 Ray William Panting (born 1887, son of the children's author, James Harwood Panting, 1854 - 1924) married Francis Eleanor Bond. Their son Dennis Brent Panting was born on 22 January 1915 when the family lived at 4 Strathyre Avenue, Norbury. Ray Panting was a 'Stockbroker' on enlistment for the Durham Light Infantry, 21 November 1916, to serve until becoming a Prisoner of war in 1918.

By 1936 the family had arrived at Strathyre, 30 Ewell Downs Road, Epsom. In 1939 Dennis became engaged to Margaret Elizabeth Jones from Kuala Lumpur and their marriage was registered in Surrey Mid E District, 6/1940.

On 26 February 1940 Dennis Brent Panting had obtained a commission as Lieutenant in the Middlesex Regiment, with a Service number 129533, but relinquished it , 3 February 1942, transferring into the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve to be a Pilot Officer on probation, 114393. He rose to the rank of Flight Lieutenant with 104 Squadron, RAF.

Wellington VIII, HK 688, took off at 1738 hours on 16 April 1943 to bomb Ste Marie du Zit Landing Ground, Nothing was heard from the aircraft and it failed to return to base.

Crew :
RAF Flt. Lt. D. B.Panting, Captain (Pilot)
RAAF 403336 FO. M. A.Harland, (2nd Pilot)
RCAF WO2 W. J. Watters, (Navigator)
RAF Sgt. L. Lewis, (Wireless Air Gunner)
RCAF WO2 A. R. Twiss, (Air Gunner)
The aircraft was reported as seen in flames over the target and may have crashed near Shallufa. Reported 'missing in action' all the crew were killed and they were eventually buried in the Enfidaville War Cemetery, Tunisia.

In his book Wellington Wings, An RAF intelligence officer in the western desert, 1980, F R Chappell described Denis Panting as 'our racing motorist pilot - the perfect film type'.

Margaret Elizabeth Panting (born 10 February 1917) became a member of the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry (FANY) and was employed in the Special Operations Executive. On 26 February 1945, in London, she married secondly Lt. Douglas Haden Baker, another SOE member, from Summit New Jersey, USA.

Brian Bouchard © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PARBERY Robert George. Fireman

National Fire Service
Died 06/02/1943, aged 33

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Of 23 Gratton Road, West Kensington, London. Husband Of Emily Irene Parbery.

Injured 17 April 1941, at Westminster, London; died at Long Grove Hospital, EpsomPlease contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PARSONS, Maude

Civilian
Died 11 October 1940, aged 59

Maude (née Dunkley) was born on 9 June 1887. In Q2 1908, in the St George Hanover Square district of London, she married Percy Henry Parsons (born 29 July 1877). It does not appear that they had any children.

The 1939 Register records the couple living alone at 101 Sunny Bank, Woodcote Green, Epsom. Percy is listed as "Retired Assistant Secretary" (presumably the senior Civil Service Grade) and Maud with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties".

Maude died at home as a result of enemy action on 11 October, in the same raid that also killed John Whitlow who lived next door.

She was buried in Epsom Cemetery (Grave M484) on 16 October 1940.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PASKELL, Reginald Derrick Frank. Sergeant (1463844)

256 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
Died 23 July 1943, aged N/K

Son of George Frank, and Alice Eliza Paskell, of Worcester Park, Surrey.

Commemorated on the Malta Memorial, Malta.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PAUL, Eric William. Private (S/198758)

Royal Army Service Corps - attached to HQ 6th Infantry Brigade.
Died 6 April 1943, aged 31

Son of Albert and Minnie Paul, of Stoneleigh, Epsom, Surrey.

Commemorated on the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PAYNTER, Sydney. Gunner 1517602

152 Bty., 51 Lt. A.A. Regt. Royal Artillery
Died 27 May 1940 Age 25

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Henry W. F. Paynter, and of Nellie Paynter, of Epsom, Surrey.

Commemorated: Dunkirk Memorial, Column 14.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PEARSON Nevill Corrie, Signalman. 2327369.

Royal Corps of Signals.
Died 13 February 1942, age 22.

Nevill Corrie Pearson was born in Hastings, Sussex in 1919 (GRO reference: Jun 1919 Hastings 2b 26), the son of Joseph William and Florence Eva (née Taylor) Pearson.

Nevill's father's occupation was noted in the 1911 census as a boot maker on his own account working from his home 55, Howarth Street, Old Trafford, Manchester. Both of Nevill's parents were recorded as being aged 24 years old when they married on 10 June 1916 in St. Anne's church in Sale, Cheshire. (Nevill's father was actually aged 27 having been born on 5 January 1889 to Joseph Corrie and Alice Ann Pearson).

By 1921 the family had moved south to Surrey and were at living at 7, New Cottages, Horton Hill, Epsom. When Nevill's sister Mavis Margaret was born the following year, they were living at 144, Horton Hill. This may well have been the same cottage as renumbering of roads, in Epsom, was implemented in the 1920s.

Nevill and his family moved several times within the Epsom district and were recorded as living at the following addresses:
1925/27: - 15, Court Farm Gardens, Manor Green Road
1928/29: - 23, Ebbisham Road
1934: - 22, Hook Road
1935/37: - "Lyndhurst", Grosvenor Road
1938/39: - 8, Hamilton Close
While Nevill's sister Mavis worked as a typist for the Post Office during WWII, Nevill enlisted and became Signalman 2327369 in the Royal Corps of Signals.

During the Japanese invasion of Malaya, the Japanese crossed the Straits of Johore and landed at the mouth of the Kranji River on 8 February 1942. On the evening of 9 February they launched an attack during which fierce fighting, including hand-to-hand combat, ensued for several days until the official surrender by General Percival on 15 February. During this fighting, Nevill was attached as a signalman to the 29th Construction Section of the Malaya Command Signals. After the surrender of Singapore, the Japanese established one of their Prisoner of War camps in Kranji.

Nevill's final resting place after his death on 13 February 1942 is unknown but he is remembered on Column 45 of the Singapore Memorial, which stands in Kranji War Cemetery. Kranji War Cemetery is 22 kilometres north of the city of Singapore, on the north side of Singapore Island overlooking the Straits of Johore.

Singapore Memorial
Singapore Memorial
Singapore Memorial
Photographs courtesy of Bert Barnhurst © 2014

After his death, Nevill's distraught parents approached their local church, St. Barnabas in Temple Road, Epsom and requested that they had some sort of memorial in the church for their dear son. A candlestick was eventually purchased by themselves, at the cost of £14 16 shillings (around £500 in 2014), as a lasting memorial in St. Barnabas church to Nevill. Whether it was engraved with his name was not recorded in the account book entry.

St. Barnabas Church Account Book, 1 January 1946
St. Barnabas Church Account Book, 1 January 1946

In January 2014 I enquired as to the whereabouts of the candlestick, and received the following reply from the vicar:
"I cannot find any reference in the old inventories to any silver candlestick (or sticks)'. There are several brass candlesticks but not any inscribed or recorded as being in memoriam or gift in the name of Pearson."
On 2 September 1947, the St. Barnabas Parochial Church Council (PCC) announced that the Town Clerk had sent them a circular stating "that a Roll of Honour was being prepared consisting of those living in the Borough at any time who had lost their lives by Enemy action. The list would include members of the Forces and any others connected with the Forces and also civilians." It was noted that the vicar, Father Anderson, would make enquiries and send to the Town Clerk the names of members of his parish who had given their lives.

Extract from St. Barnabas Church PCC minutes, 2 September 1947
Extract from St. Barnabas Church PCC minutes, 2 September 1947

Nevill Corrie Pearson's name was included in his list and can be viewed in the WWII Book of Remembrance http://www.epsomandewellhistoryexplorer.org.uk/WW2Book.html on display in a cabinet in Epsom Town Hall.

The following year the St. Barnabas PCC also agreed that they would request that a friend of Mrs. Colgate produce a WWII Roll of Honour, similar to the one that Phyllis Chipperfield had painted for the WW1 Roll of Honour. It was to be framed and hung at the back of the church where the WW1 Roll of Honour was displayed. The final memorial contained the names of eighteen St. Barnabas' parishioners who had died during the hostilities.

St. Barnabas WWII Roll of Honour
St. Barnabas WWII Roll of Honour
Reproduced by permission of Surrey History Centre

On 21 June 1948 Nevill's father Joseph, aged 59, died. Probate records show that he had been living at 9, Hamilton Close, Epsom and that his effects had been valued at £244 19 shillings. In the 1955 British Telephone Directory, Nevill's sister Mavis was listed as still living at 9, Hamilton Close, Epsom but by 1957 she and her mother had moved to 45, Temple Road, Epsom, which is almost opposite St. Barnabas church.

Nevill's widowed mother died on 1 June 1963 at the Royal Isle of Wight County Hospital in Ryde. Probate of her effects valued at £156 15 shillings was granted to her unmarried daughter Mavis. Mavis was still living at 45, Temple Road, Epsom in 1979.

Sources:
CWGC
Ancestry
FreeBMD
Epsom Electoral Registers
British Telephone Directories
St. Barnabas PCC Minute Records and Account Books
Reverend Michael Preston
Researched and written by Hazel Ballan © 2014

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PECK, Charles William. Captain 175068

Royal Army Medical Corps
Died 30 October 1942 Age 27

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Richard Hector William and Florence Calpin Peck, of Tattenham Corner, Epsom, Surrey. L.R.C.P., M.R.C.S.

Commemorated: Brookwood 1939-1945 Memorial, Panel 18. Column 1.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PEDDIE, Thomas John. Sapper (2196887)

Royal Engineers, 107 Bomb Disposal Section
Died 9 January 1941, aged 32

Thomas Peddie's headstone in Epsom Cemetery (M.600)
Thomas Peddie's headstone in Epsom Cemetery (M.600)
Photograph by Roger Morgan © 2017

Thomas was born on 11 September 1909 to parents Robert William Peddie ("Laundry Labourer") and Emily (née Risbridger) who had married at Christ Church on Christmas Day 1898. The 1911 Census records the family (with Thomas as the youngest of four children) living at Yew Tree Cottages, Epsom Common.

In Q3 1931, Thomas married Sarah A D Little, of Epsom. The 1939 Register records them living at 83 Tonstall Road, Epsom with a lodger, Edward Rossiter (listed, like Thomas, as a "Builder's Labourer"), and two currently closed records - presumably their children Kenneth (born Q1 1933) and Michael (born Q2 1937).

Thomas served with the Royal Engineers 107 Bomb Disposal Section. His skills - and those of his many colleagues - were in high demand as enemy bombing raids reached something of a crescendo. It is estimated that between 5% and 15% of the many, many WW2 bombs did not detonate as planned. There was no way of telling whether an unexploded bomb was a complete dud or in danger of exploding at any moment. Until it was made safe - the extremely dangerous job of these brave men - it would paralyse the surrounding area.

Thomas did not, however, lose his life in the execution of his most hazardous trade. His Death Certificate records that he died in the Davyhulme Military Hospital (on the outskirts of Manchester) as a result of "multiple injuries sustained by being thrown from a motor lorry into the highway" - perhaps on the way to yet another job. An Inquest held on 14 January resulted in a verdict of "accidental death.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PENDRY, Gordon. Private (6106291).

2nd Battalion, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment
Died 25 October 1944, aged 22

2nd Battalion, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment

Son of George Alfred and Mabel Eleanor Pendry, of Epsom, Surrey.

Buried in the Forli War Cemetery, Italy

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PENFOLD Ernest John, Gunner 1771905

2 Maritime Regiment. Royal Artillery
Killed in Action 22 February 1944 aged 32.

Ernest Penfold
Ernest Penfold
Image Courtesy of the Penfold Family © 2008

Ernest John Penfold was born on 27 April 1911 at Gibraltar, Ewell to Mr E J S Penfold and Mrs Annie Penfold daughter of John E Stevens of Epsom, who was originally from Bentworth, Hampshire. Ernest (aka Bimmy) had three younger brothers, Harry (aka Dinks), George (aka Pud) and Stanley (aka Toby) and one older sister Winifred (aka Dolly). The family lived in Rosebery Road, Langley Vale

Pud, Toby and Bimmy, some of the Penfold brothers.
Pud, Toby and Bimmy, some of the Penfold brothers.
Image Courtesy of the Penfold Family © 2008

Ernest's father, also called Ernest John, was working as a labourer on the construction of the 1927 Epsom Grand Stand when he died falling down a lift shaft as a result of an accident on the site. From 1936 the three youngest boys lived with their mother in Grosvenor Road, Langley Vale.

In 1936 Ernest (the younger) married Alice Bland from Staindrop, Co. Durham. They also lived in Langley Vale and had two children Elizabeth (Anne), and Kathleen (Kate), both born in Epsom.

Ernest joined the Royal Artillery Embodied Territorial Army as a Gunner on 20 February 1941. Initially he was posted to 288th Anti Aircraft Driving Training Regiment and was then posted to No.2 Maritime Anti-Aircraft Battery. By 6 May 1941 the force was called the Maritime Anti-Aircraft RA but in 1942 it was called the Maritime Royal Artillery. On the 1 March 1944 Ernest's unit was re-designated the No. 2 Maritime Regiment.

The job of this regiment was to protect merchant ships and the 1939-1945 conflict saw the first soldiers from the Regiment on board ships. As few as two 'Gunners' would be attached initially to coasters but as the need to protect ships of all sizes grew so did the regiment.

Ernest Penfold in 1944 just before he died.
Ernest Penfold in 1944 just before he died.
Image Courtesy of the Penfold Family © 2008

Ernest was allocated as a 'Gunner' on various ships, his last being the SS BRITISH CHIVALRY, a freighter. This ship was attacked by a Japanese submarine in the Indian Ocean on 22 February 1944. The submarine then surfaced and having first taken the Master, Capt. W. Hill, prisoner, it circled the survivors raking their life boats with machine gun fire for two hours. It was during this attack Gunner Penfold lost his life. Surprisingly after 37 days in an open boat, 38 survivors were rescued by the M.V. Delane.

The commander of the submarine (Lt-Cdr Hajime Nakagawa) had already carried out war crimes including the sinking of the hospital ship Centaur (14 May 1943) where 268 people died. One account suggests that after the war Nakagawa was arrested and tried for war crimes, spending four years in Sugamo prison for atrocities committed in the Indian Ocean. Another suggested he did pay the ultimate price. The Centaur was declared a historic wreck in 1990.

The No. 2 Maritime Regiment was stood down in 1946; an Association has been formed for the MRAA aiming to represent 'The Forgotten Regiment'. In 1989, for the first time the Regiment was given a place at the annual Remembrance Day parade.

Following WWII Ernest's widow Alice and their children continued to live in Langley Vale (see Langley Vale Remembered). Alice died in 1991. George/Pud (1913-1997) was a self employed builder, well known in the Epsom area. Toby was the last to marry (Agnes McSherry 1908-1991). They had one daughter, Rosemary, who died in 1997. Toby died in 2007 at Epsom.

Ernest's brother Harry also died at sea as a result of the war and both deaths are recorded in the Epsom and Ewell World War Two Book of Remembrance.

Text courtesy of Kathleen Penfold © 2008

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PENFOLD Harry, Gunner 1099081

68th Medium Regiment , Royal Artillery
Killed in Action 14 November 1942 aged 27.

Harry Penfold
Harry Penfold
Image Courtesy of the Penfold Family © 2008

Harry Penfold was born on 19 Jun 1915 at Rosebery Road, Langley Vale, to Mr E J S Penfold and Mrs Annie Penfold daughter of John E Stevens of Epsom, who was originally from Bentworth, Hampshire. Harry (aka Dinks) had two younger brothers, George (aka Pud) and Stanley (aka Toby), an older sister Winifred (aka Dolly) and an older brother Ernest (aka Bimmy). As there was no school in the village at the time, the four older children had to walk, with some cousins and other local children, to St. Giles school in Ashtead. Toby was lucky in that he missed that walk when the Langley Vale school opened.

Pud, Toby and Bimmy, some of the Penfold brothers.
Pud, Toby and Bimmy, some of the Penfold brothers.
Image Courtesy of the Penfold Family © 2008

Harry's father, Ernest, was working as a labourer on the construction of the 1927 Epsom Grand Stand when he died falling down a lift shaft as a result of an accident on the site. From 1936 the three youngest boys lived with their mother in Grosvenor Road, Langley Vale.

Harry, who was unmarried, enlisted on 14 November 1940. Initially he was posted to 16th Field Training Regiment but later was posted to 72nd Regiment and from there to 68th Medium Regiment Serving in the Middle East from 23 April 1941. He was taken as a Prisoner of War by the Italians from 20 June 1942 and was last known to be in Campo 154 in Benghazi prior to embarkation on the SS Scillin. This Italian cargo/passenger ship was en route from Tripoli to Sicily with 814 Commonwealth prisoners of war on board, a naval gun crew and 30 Italian guards when on 14 November 1942 it was torpedoed by the British submarine HMS Sahib (Captain Lt. John Bromage) 10 miles north of Cape Milazzo in the Tyrrhenian Sea.

SS Scillin
SS Scillin.

The Sahib rescued 27 POWs from the water (26 British and one South African) plus the Scillin's captain and 45 Italian crew members. Only then, when the commander heard the survivors speaking English, did he realize that he had sunk a ship carrying British prisoners of war as well as some Italian soldiers and had drowned 783 men. At a subsequent inquiry into this 'friendly fire' tragedy, Lt. Bromage was cleared of any wrongdoing as the ship was unmarked and at the time he firmly believed that the ship was carrying Italian troops.

The Ministry of Defence kept this incident a closely guarded secret for fifty-four years, telling relatives a pack of lies, maintaining that they had died while prisoners of war in Italian camps or simply 'lost at sea'. It was not until 1996, after repeated requests for information from the families of the drowned men, that the truth came out. The SS SCILLIN was always the intended target of the Sahib. At that time it seems the war was not going well, losses were high and the one good thing which had happened could not be told: 'the Enigma code' had been broken. To prove the code had not broken the SS SCILLIN was to be used as a diversion, it would reinforce the belief English would not attack its own. The SAHIB was given the time the SS SCILLIN would be leaving the port, even to being advised when its departure was going to be three hours later.

Following the sinking, the Sahib was itself attacked by bombs from escort German Ju-88s and depth charges from the Italian corvette Gabbiano in the counter attack immediately after the sinking. Badly damaged, the Sahib was later abandoned and scuttled

Immediately following WWII Harry's brother George/Pud (1913-1997) was a self employed builder, well known in the Epsom area. Toby was the last to marry (Agnes McSherry 1908-1991). They had one daughter, Rosemary, who died in 1997. Toby died in 2007 at Epsom.

Harry's brother Ernest also died at sea as a result of the war and both deaths are recorded in the Epsom and Ewell World War Two Book of Remembrance.

Text courtesy of Kathleen Penfold © 2008


Addendum
We are very grateful to Mr Brian Sims for pointing out that the image of the S.S. Scillin was taken in 1937 when the ship was named the Nicole De Borgne and originated from his personal collection. Mr Sims's research, some of which is included in the above text, shows that there were only 30 Italian Soldiers aboard the ship plus a Naval Gun Crew and 36 Italians were picked up by the P212 and taken back to Malta where they were interrogated. He also mentions that there is a memorial to those lost on the Scillin and 5 other ships at The National Memorial Arboretum.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PENTNEY, Douglas Charles. Serjeant 1517518

2/6th Bn. The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey)
Died 28 February 1945 Age 29

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Charles Henry and Helena Charlotte Pentney, of Ewell, Surrey.

Buried: Forli War Cemetery, V, B, 14.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PICKSTOCK, Cyril Albert

Civilian
Died 28 September 1940, aged 29

Cyril was born on 1 September 1911, the son of A E and M E Pickstock, noted by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as being of 53 Lloyds Way, Beckenham, Kent.

In Q3 1939, he married Kathleen S Hawkes (born 2 January 1911), The 1939 Register records the couple living at 73 Amis Avenue, Ewell. (The original record is quite clearly "73" rather than the "13" given in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's records - which probably copied the number from the Epsom Cemetery records.)

The 1939 Register records Cyril's occupation as a Solicitor's Clerk - with Kathleen's being the conventional "unpaid domestic duties".

However it is recorded that he died at 13 (or did they again mean 73?) Amis Avenue, presumably as the result of enemy action rather than his off-work duties with the Auxiliary Fire Service.

Cyril was buried in Epsom Cemetery (Grave M354) on 3 October 1940.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PILLEY, John Herbert. Sergeant/Pilot (910886). DFM

107 & 18 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
Died 8 December 1941, aged 21

John was born on 31 October 1920, the son of Ernest and Nora Gladys Pilley (noted in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records as being "of" Worthing, Sussex.)

John's secondary education was at Epsom County School for Boys (now Glyn School) which he joined in 1932. He did not make the most of his time there. His name appeared frequently in the punishment book and, having failed to pass his School Certificate, began to repeat the year. A report on John stated,
"This boy, who is nearly 16 and was in the pre-school Certificate Form played truant last term and was allowed back only on strict conditions. These he broke and therefore it was suggested to the father that the boy should be withdrawn. This he has done."
The school magazine perhaps generously described John as having "an adventurous spirit", but that stood him in good stead during WW2. John was initially attached to 107 Squadron before transferring to 18 Squadron and it was during a mission with them that he received his Distinguished Flying Medal. The citation in the London Gazette of 12 September 1941 reads:-
"On the morning of 12th August 1941, Blenheim bombers carried out simultaneous attacks on the great power stations near Cologne. A strong force attacked the station at Knapsack, whilst a smaller force attacked two stations at Quadrath. These missions involved a flight of some 250 miles over enemy territory .which was carried out at an altitude of 100 feet. At Knapsack the target was accurately bombed and machine gunned from between 200 and 800 feet and at Quadrath both power stations were hit from the height of the chimneys; the turbine House at one of the two stations was left a mass of flames and smoke. The success of this combined daylight attack and the co-ordination of the many formations of aircraft depended largely on accurate timing throughout the flight. That complete success was achieved, despite powerful opposition from enemy ground and air forces, is a high tribute to the calm courage and resolute determination displayed by the following officers and airmen, who participated in various capacities as leaders and members of the aircraft crews:-"
(One of the Squadron Leaders involved in the attack - and who was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross was William John Edrich (89346) of 21 Squadron who later found fame playing cricket for England.)

In September 1941, John's Squadron was sent to Malta, from where it carried out anti-shipping missions around the Italian coast, Sicily and along the North African coast. This was a desperately difficult time for Malta - and, indeed, the Squadron whose losses at one time were so heavy that it was commanded by a sergeant.

On 8 December 1941, John - now a Sergeant-pilot - took off with other Blenheims on a mission to attack the airfield at Catania on the east coast of Sicily.

The Bristol Blenheim light bomber.

The Bristol Blenheim light bomber.
Copyright acknowledged.

According to an Italian report of the attack, the only losses on the ground were one MC.200 destroyed and three more slightly damaged. They also reported that no British planes were shot down. However, John's aircraft did not return.

His obituary in the school magazine saying he was "shot down in the defence of Malta" is now known to be wide of the mark. The truth is more tragic. In very poor visibility and diving towards the target Pilley's plane collided with another Blenheim from the same unit and there were no survivors.

His remains were never recovered and he is commemorated on the Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede.

This article has drawn heavily on material in Section 3 ("The War Years") of the Glyn School history, which is gratefully acknowledged.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PONSFORD, Wallace Edward. Serjeant 2617967

43rd (2/5th Bn. Gloucestershire Regt.) Regt. The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey)
Died 7 December 1944 Age 27

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of George Albert Ponsford and of Emma Elizabeth Ponsford (nee Parker); husband of Marie Ponsford, of Epsom, Surrey.

Buried: Brunssum War Cemetery, IV. 164.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


POWELL, Eric Stanley.

Civilian
Died 4 September 1940 Age 26

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Mrs. A. Powell, of 25 Calton Park Avenue, Raynes Park, and of the late E. Powell; husband of Norah Powell, of 38 Poole Road, West Ewell. Died at Vickers Armstrong Works, Weybridge.

Buried: Walton And Weybridge, Urban District,

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PRATT, Sidney Thomas.

Civilian
Died 15 May 1941 Age 68

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of the late Henry and Jane Pratt, of Headley, Epsom, Surrey; husband of Mary Helen Pratt, of Woodford Bungalow, Milltown, Muddiford. Injured at Westaway Cross; died same day at the North Devon Infirmary, Marwood.

Buried: Barnstaple, Rural District,

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PRICE Godfrey Ronald. Sub-Lieutenant (Mentioned in Dispatches)

Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve - HM Motor Torpedo Boat 72
Died 28/02/1943, aged 21

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Godfrey Horace Reginald and Evelyn Hayes Price; husband of Margaret Ida Price (nee Corke), of West Ewell.

Serverd aboard HMMTB 72 (torpedo boat).

Buried Felixstowe New Cemetery, Block B. Sec. K. Grave 39.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PRIOR Elizabeth

Civilian
Died 12/10/1940, aged 64

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Of 1 Woodlands Park Road, Greenwich, London. Wife of Charles Prior. Injured 8 September 1940, at 1 Woodlands Park Road; died at Horton Emergency Hospital, Epsom.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PULLING, Walter George. Driver T/167231

Royal Army Service Corps
Died 27 May 1940 Age 31

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Noah John and Emma Pulling; husband of Muriel May Pulling, of Epsom, Surrey.

Commemorated: Dunkirk Memorial, Column 138.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PULLINGER, William Todd. Aircraftman 2nd Class (1476335)

615 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
Died 31 July 1942, aged 37.

William was born in Lambeth on 15 September 1904, the son of William and Louisa Mary Pullinger.

In Croydon Q3 1933, he married Freda Victoria Beer. The 1939 Register records the couple living at 25 Pams Way, Ewell with William's occupation being listed as "Telephone Operator (LCC Mental Hosp.)" - doubtless one of the then "Epsom Cluster. Freda is shown with the conventional "Unpaid domestic duties". There is one currently closed record, probably their child: William's headstone carries an extra message from Freda (his wife) and "Pat-Ann".

William is buried at Calcutta (Bhowanipore) Cemetery, Kolkata, India.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PURCELL Allen Harold Dashwood. Air Raid Warden

Air Raid Warden
Died 11/01/1941, aged 44

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Allen was born on 28 May 1896, at least the second child of Allen Henry and Isabella Maud Purcell. The 1911 Census records the family living at 12 Elm Grove Wimbledon - presumably the "Frant Lodge, Elm Grove" that, according to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records, his late parents were "of".

In 1917, Allen was conscripted and served in the Labour Corps' 366 Company. In Q3 1929, he married Kathleen Elaine Julian, registered in Kingston upon Thames. The couple appear to have had at least one child, Allen B Purcell, born in Croydon Q2 1932.

In September 1934, Allen sailed to Jamaica on board fruit importers Elder and Fyffes' SS Cavina. The passenger list records him as a Clerk and his address as 36 Tudor Close, Cheam. The 1939 Register records the couple living at "Wayside", West Farm Avenue, Ashtead. There two currently closed records at that address, probably their children. Allen is listed as "Clerk, Shipowners Office" and Kathleen as the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records list their address as 133 Sunnybank, Woodcote Green, Epsom.

It seems clear that Allen worked for Elder and Fyffes, Bow Street and it was at their offices in Bow Street, London, that he was killed by the same bomb that also killed Francis Burlton (the article on whom has fuller details) and Charles Crawforth.

Roger Morgan © 2017

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PUTTICK, Wilfred. Sergeant 929723

10 Sqdn. Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 26 July1941, aged N/K

Wilfred Puttick.
Wilfred Puttick.
Picture courtesy of aircrewremembered.com

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

John Puttick, born Brighton, Sussex, 13 April 1871, became indentured as a Merchant seaman in 1885. He married Mabel Gray (b. 1874) on 25 November 1902 at St Saviour, Paddington. Birth of their son Wilfred Puttick came to be recorded at Ampthill for the September Quarter of 1914.

Wilfred was educated at Bedford Modern School and became a Scout leader in the 4th Northwood Group.

With a Service number 929723 Wilfred had enlisted at Uxbridge with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve during or after September 1939. He was a member No 56 Course at 2 Service Flying Training School, Brize Norton, Oxfordshire, from 13 November 1940 to 31 March 1941 before proceeding to No 21 Course at 19 OTU which commenced 11 May 1941.

Sgt. Wilfred Puttick died 26 July 1941, aged 27, whilst flying Whitley T4231, ZA-A, with 10 Squadron. The aircraft was airborne at 22.28 Hours on 25 July 1941 from RAF Leeming for a raid on Hannover and crashed at Koersel (Limburg), 15 km NNW of Hasselt, Belgium with the loss of all those on board. The reason for the loss has never been established.

Images and further information may be found at aircrewremembered.com

The crew of 5 consisted of PO William McNaughton Spiers, MiD, Sgt Wilfred Puttick, PO Harry Joseph Daniels, Sgt Cyril Webster Fitzmaurice D E Lawson and Sgt Douglas Bernard Beverley. PO Daniels had received a Commendation of Gallantry.

The casualties were interred at Koersel Communal Cemetery, Beringen, Limburg, Belgium, with W Puttick in Grave 5.

Wilfred is commemorated on a memorial is situated on the wall of the St Mary's church, Westoning, Beds., as well as in Bedford Modern School's Roll of Honour. Additionally there is a monument in Flitwick extension churchyard, Bedfordshire: - 'In memory of Esther Gray who died on 11 June 1918, aged 71. Also in proud and loving memory of Sgt pilot Wilfred Puttick RAFVR Grandson of the above and dearly loved youngest son of John and Mabel Puttick who was killed in action July 26th 1941, aged 27 years. While there is light I will remember. When the night comes I will not forget'.

The CWGC lists Wilfred as 'Son of John and Mabel Puttick, of Ewell, Epsom, Surrey'. His family were , however, in Apthill during 1939 and only came to Ewell after the end of WW2. By 1951, John and Mabel Puttick were resident with their married daughter, Margery M Grimmette, and son in law, at 26 Oakland Way, Ewell. The death of Mabel Puttick was registered in Surrey Mid E, 6/1953. John Puttick survived his wife to die aged 97, reg. Dover, 6/1969.

Brian Bouchard © 2018

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index


PYE Catherine

Civilian
Died 02/12/1940, aged 76

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Wife of D. W. Pye, of 24 Belmont Road, South Norwood, Croydon. Died at Horton Emergency Hospital, Epsom.

Please contact the Webmaster if you have information or pictures that can extend this entry.

Back to the index




Please Note: We believe that the information on this page is accurate however users should satisfy themselves that the information is correct before incurring any expense or undertaking any journeys. This is particularly important when purchasing certificates from other bodies, for example the General Register Office. You might like to use the following links to Freebmd and Find My Past (Links open in a new window).

War Memorials
War Memorials
All Saints
All Saints
Dipping Well
Dipping Well
Ashley Road
Ashley Road
St Mary's Ewell
St Mary's Ewell
Sgt. Green and the Epsom Riot
Epsom Riot
Woodcote Camp
Woodcote Camp