WW2 Book of Remembrance - Surnames N

Index

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[Content]

NEAL, Brian Denis (New 30/10/2017)
NEILSON, James (New 08/01/2018)
NEWBERY, Alfred George (Revised 01/10/2017)
NEWBERY, George Dunster (New 01/10/2017)
NEWBY, George (New 08/01/2018)
NEWLING, Michael Alan (New 30/10/2017)
NEWMAN, Ernest James Edward (New 30/10/2017)
NEWMAN, George (New 30/10/2017)
NICHOLLS, Cyril Sydney * (New 30/10/2017)
NICHOLSON, John Girvin * (New 30/10/2017)
NOKES, Ernest Edward * (New 30/10/2017)
NORMAN, Harold Bertie (New 30/10/2017)
NORRIS, Charles Ernest * (New 30/10/2017)
NORRIS, Stanley Jack (New 30/10/2017)

* = Not included in the Book of Remembrance for reasons unknown.
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Content


NEAL, Brian Denis. Bombardier (269127)

4 Field Regiment, New Zealand Artillery.
Died 25 July 1944, aged 25

Son of Dennis Alfred and Elsie Morgan Neal; husband of Mary Isobel Neal, of Point Chevalier, Auckland, New Zealand.

Buried in the Bolsena War Cemetery, Italy.

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NEILSON, James. Staff Serjeant 2754514

The Glider Pilot Regiment, A.A.C.
Died 24 March 1945 Age 25

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Mr. and Mrs. James Neilson; husband of F. C. S. Neilson, of West Ewell, Surrey.

Commemorated: Groesbeek Memorial, Panel 8.

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NEWBERY Alfred George. Gunner (6102818)

Royal Artillery 5/3 Maritime Regiment
Died 10 March 1943, aged 28

Alfred George Newbery was born on 8 August 1915, the third child of George Dunster Newbery (a carpenter) and Maud Mary (née Elsey). His parents had married in Christ Church Epsom Common on 13 July 1901 and, as for his three siblings, this is where Alfred was baptised. That was on 19 December 1915, when the church records noted the family's address as 111 Church Side, Epsom Common. And, in the 1939 Register, Alfred, his widowed father (Maud having died in 1936) and his younger brother William were still there. (Alfred was recorded as a "Builder's Labourer", while both his father and William were "Carpenters and Joiners".) However, the head of the household was recorded in 1939 as William O'Sullivan (a "foreman of boiler & steam pipe etc - heavy work') with his wife, Margaret - Alfred's older sister - and two young children.

Alfred's WW2 role was as a Gunner in the Royal Artillery's 5/3 Maritime Regiment. As noted in the fuller article about the Borough's Naval Fatalities, merchant ships carrying vital cargo were usually "Defensively Equipped Merchant Ships" (DEMS) with mounted guns of some kind, and both the Royal Navy and the Royal Artillery Maritime Regiment deployed gunners to man them.

In March 1943, Alfred Newbery was serving on the SS Nailsea Court, laden with over 7,500 tons of general cargo, including 650 tons of copper bars and 800 tons of nickel ore. The ship was part of the Convoy SC-121 (the prefix denoting "Slow Convoy") from Nova Scotia to the UK. It left Canadian waters with 69 freighters and an escort of 2 destroyers, 3 cutters and 4 corvettes.

The Nailsea Court
The Nailsea Court
Photo Courtesy of Library of Contemporary History, Stuttgart

U-boat attacks on the Convoy began in the mid-Atlantic on 7 May when two merchant ships were lost. Six were then lost on 8 May, and another five on 9 May. At just after 01:00 on 10 March, U-299 fired three torpedoes. Nailsea Court was hit and sank with the loss of the master (Ralph Good, OBE), 33 crew members, nine gunners (including Alfred) and two passengers: only four (all crew members) were rescued.

That was the last attack on the Convoy. Of the 69 freighters that set out from Nova Scotia, 14 (a fifth) were lost - together with, in aggregate, about three quarters of their crew.

Like many others lost at sea, Alfred is remembered on the Chatham Naval Memorial.

A sad postscript is that, only a few weeks after Alfred's death, his widowed father, George Dunster Newbery, died at 111 Church Side. He was buried in Epsom Cemetery on 30 April 1943, and is listed in the Borough's WW2 Book of Remembrance as a civilian casualty.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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NEWBERY, George Dunster

Civilian
Died 25 April 1943, aged 69

George was born on 9 April 1874 in Chardstock, Devon to Alfred and Elizabeth Newbery. Alfred had been born in Tatworth, Somerset. He was a carpenter, and had married Elizabeth in Chardstock Q3 1869. (Her maiden name was Dunster, hence their son George's middle name. The Dunsters were a long-standing Chardstock family, but of relatively modest means: Elizabeth's father was a shepherd.)

George continued his father's carpentry trade, and moved to Epsom. On 13 July 1901, he married Maud Mary Elsey in Christ Church Epsom Common. Maud was born Q2 1879 in Greenwich but, only a couple of years later, was recorded by the 1881 Census, as living - together with a couple of older siblings - with her grandparents James and Mary Elsey on Epsom Common. She was still there for the 1901 Census - shortly before her wedding - and working as a laundrywoman. (Her grandmother was, by then, a widow.)

George and Maud had four children:
  • Mary Elizabeth - born 23 April 1904;
  • Margaret - born 7 April 1906;
  • Alfred George - born 8 August 1915; &
  • William - born 1 January 1918
all of whom were baptised at Christ Church Epsom Common, where (for the last two) the church records noted the family's address as 111 Church Side, Epsom Common.

(It may well be that George was the George Newbery that records show served during at least part of WW1 as Engine Room Artificer 4th Class with the Service Number M.13154. In any event, he then reverted to his trade as a carpenter and joiner.)

Maud died in mid-1936 and was buried in Epson Cemetery on 2 July. By the time of the 1939 Register, George was still living at 111 Church Side. However, he was no longer listed as the head of the household. That designation went to William O'Sullivan, recorded as married to Margaret, George's second daughter (although the marriage registration records list the wedding as having been in Q2 1946). Also in the household were William and Margaret's two young children and George's two sons - of whom the younger, William, was (like his father) listed as a "Carpenter and Joiner", while Alfred was recorded as a "Builder's Labourer".

As described in the separate article, Alfred Newbery served in WW2 as a Gunner in the Royal Artillery's 5/3 Maritime Regiment and, aged 28, was lost at sea when his ship was torpedoed on 10 March 1943.

Within two months of that, the 69 year old George was also dead, dying at 11 Church Side on 25 April. He was buried in Epsom Cemetery (Plot O332, which no longer has any visible grave marker) on 30 April. As illustrated below, George is listed in the Borough's Book of Remembrance (immediately under his son's name) as a civilian casualty, having died as a result of "Enemy Action".

George Newbery's entry in the Borough's Book of Remembrance
George Newbery's entry in the Borough's Book of Remembrance

However, his Death Certificate is quite clear that the cause of death was a combination of heart failure and chronic bronchitis. His final deterioration may have been accelerated by news of Alfred's death, but that does not match "Enemy Action".

Nor is George's name among the 67,000 commemorated in the WW2 Civilian War Dead Roll of Honour, located near St. George's Chapel in Westminster Abbey, London - and names on which are in the database searched via The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's website. That Civilian Roll contains only four Newberys for the whole of WW2 - and the only one who died in 1943 was the 86 year old William Newbery, a retired shoemaker, was killed during a "tip & run" air raid by four Focke-Wolfe Fw 190s on his home town of Ventnor at 4.45pm on 1 April 1943.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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NEWBY, George. Serjeant 3440142

1/6th Bn. Lancashire Fusiliers
Died 17 June 1940 Age 38

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Frank and Charlotte Newby; husband of Marion Newby, of Epsom, Surrey.

Buried: Prefailles Communal Cemetery, Grave 29.

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NEWLING, Michael Alan. Flight Lieutenant (41867) DFC

145 Squadron, Royal Air Force
Died 6 July 1941, aged 21

Michael Alan Newling
Michael Alan Newling
Image © Adrian Williams (Michael's cousin), via http://users.telenet.be

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission database does not contain even the usual brief family background for Michael - indeed, does not even have his age at death. However, thanks principally to a biography posted on http://users.telenet.be by his cousin, Adrian Williams, many details can be filled in.

Michael was born in Barnes, Surrey, on 28 February 1920, the first child of Dorothy (née Cranston) and George Arthur Newling's six children. (George had a distinguished record in WW1 with 2nd Royal Marine Battalion and was awarded the Military Cross.) Michael attended Oakham School, Rutland, until age 17 when family sailed to start a new life in New Zealand. However, only 9 months later (Autumn 1938) the prospect of war brought them back to the UK. Michael joined the RAF - one of 20 selected from over 300 applicants when he applied - and, by the time war was declared, he had been fully trained (at Uxbridge and Kenley) as a day/night fighter pilot, and stationed with 145 Squadron at RAF Tangmere, near Chichester. (He would thus not have ben at home when the 1939 Register was taken. This records the parents - with George listed as "Advertisements Director" plus three currently closed records - living at 43 Kensington Hall Garden, Fulham.)

145 Squadron's first action of the WW2 on the 18 May 1940. From the French base at Merville, Michael's Hurricane Mk I (N2600, SO-G) was part of a flight that went on patrol over Brussels where they intercepted and attached twelve German bombers. Because of combat damage, Michael was forced to leave his formation and try to fly back to base. The damage was too severe and, at 1625 hours, he had to abandon his aircraft and landed safely by parachute near the village of Pamel-Roosdaal (province of Flemish Brabant). This was behind enemy lines, through which he was led by a 13-year old boy. (Broad shouldered and 6' 2" tall, he ejected from his aircraft by turning it upside down - a technique taught to other pilots.)

After covering the evacuation from Dunkirk, Michael and his Squadron were actively involved in the ferocious Battle of Britain in the second half of 1940 and, having converted to Spitfires, in continuing actions after that.

He was mentioned in despatches on 1 January 1941 and, a month later, awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. The citation for this in the London Gazette for 4 February 1941 reads:
"This officer has been continuously engaged in active operations since May 1940, and has at all times displayed marked courage and leadership. On one occasion during an attack against a large force of enemy bombers, he was shot down into enemy territory, but with great determination succeeded in gaining his own lines. Flight Lieutenant Newling has destroyed at least three enemy aircraft and assisted in the destruction of several more."
On 6 July 1941 he was killed in action when, on one of many his Squadron's cross channel sweeps, his Spitfire Va (W3366) was attacked near Lille. It appears that, again, he sought to return to base but came don in the sea. His body was never recovered and he is commemorated on the Runneymede Memorial.

None of this, however, throws light on the connection with the Borough. Please contact the Webmaster if you have information about this.

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NEWMAN, Ernest James Edward. Lance Corporal (T/265102)

Royal Army Service Corps
Died 19 October 1945, aged 24

Ernest's headstone in Epsom Cemetery
Ernest's headstone in Epsom Cemetery
Image courtesy of Clive Gilbert © 2018

Ernest was born Q2 1921 Sidney Newman and Winifred (née Townsend - the couple married in Reigate Q2 1916)

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission note that Ernest was the "husband of Olive Newman, of Epsom." (While the marriage registers record an Olive E Bugler marrying a Haydn Newman in Sturminster, Dorset Q1 1940, they also record Ernest J E Newman marrying Lucinda M J Davis in Trowbridge, Wiltshire also Q1 1940. Further research is needed here.)

Ernest is buried in Epsom Cemetery (Grave N253), where the records note that he died in the RAF Hospital, Wroughton. Wiltshire.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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NEWMAN, George. Private (6139172)

1st Battalion, East Surrey Regiment.
Died 16 November 1940, aged N/K.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission database does not contain even the usual brief family background for George - indeed, does not even have his age at death, noting only that he is buried in the Bournemouth North Cemetery, Hampshire.

George Newman's headstone
George Newman's headstone
Image © S J Hearn via findagrave.com

Roger Morgan © 2017

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NICHOLLS Cyril Sydney. Lieutenant

RN Volunteer Reserve - HMS Patia
Died 27/04/1941, aged 36

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Sydney and Ethel Nicholls of Buckhurst Hill; husband of Renee (Irene) S Nicholls, of Epsom Downs.

Served on HMS Patia (a fighter catapult ship) which was sunk by a bomb from a German Heinkel HE111 with the loss of 39 lives.

Buried Buckhurst Hill (St John the Baptist) Churchyard, Essex.

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NICHOLSON John Girvin. Midshipman

Royal Navy - HMS Isis
Died 20/07/1944, aged 18

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of George Robbins Nicholson and Lilian Elizabeth Nicholson, of Ewell but the family lived in Streatham at time of John's death.

Served aboard HMS Isis which was mined and sunk off Normandy, France with the loss of 160 lives.

Commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, Panel 85, Column 1 and on the HMS Isis memorial in Portsmouth Cathedral

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NOKES Ernest Edward

Civilian
Died 10/05/1945, aged 54

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Husband of Esther Elizabeth Nokes, of 56 Elizabeth Avenue, Islington, London. Injured 7 January 1945, at 37 Ringcroft Street, Holloway, London; died at St. Ebba's Hospital, Epsom.

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NORMAN, Harold Bertie. Trooper (6849930)

"A" Squadron, 40th (7th Battalion The Kings Regiment [Liverpool]),
Royal Tank Regiment, R.A.C.

Died 27 September 1943, aged 22.

Son of George Norman, and of Dorothy Norman, of Epsom, Surrey.

Buried in the Salerno War Cemetery, Italy.

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NORRIS Charles Ernest

Civilian
Died 25/09/1940, aged 76

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Of 16 Lambeth Road, London, S.E.1. Died at Horton Emergency Hospital, Epsom. Buried Epsom Cemetery, Grave M354.

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NORRIS, Stanley Jack. Gunner (1627882)

5 Searchlight Regiment, Royal Artillery.
Died 5 March 1943, aged 31

Son of Frederick John and Kate Norris, of West Ewell, Surrey.

Commemorated on the Singapore Memorial.

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