WW2 Book of Remembrance - Surnames D

Index

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[Content]

DANIELL, Michael Charles (New 10/08/2017)
DAVIS, Edward Strangways (New 08/01/2018)
DAVIS, Ernest Burchett (New 08/01/2018)
DAVIS, Ernest John Walter (Revised 21/12/2017)
DAVISON, Norman John (New 08/01/2018)
DAVIS, Victor George * (Revised 14/12/2017)
DAY, Alec Ronald (Revised 14/12/2017)
DAY, Ernest (Revised 29/11/2017)
DAY, John Terence Gordon (Revised 14/12/2017)
DE JONGH, Oscar Geoffreij (New 08/01/2018)
DEAN, Albert Edward (New 08/01/2018)
DENYER, William Arthur John (Revised 19/12/2017)
DENYER, William Charles (Revised 19/12/2017)
DICKINSON, Frederick (New 08/01/2018)
DIXON, Reginald John (New 08/01/2018)
DONALDSON, Charles Alexander (Revised 19/12/2017)
DORMAN, Kenneth Frederick Edward (Revised 13/11/2017)
DOWLING, Harry Walter (Revised 29/11/2017)
DOWNWARD, Arthur Cyril Reid (Revised 21/12/2017)
DRUMMOND, Clifford John (New 08/01/2018)
DUNBAR, James Laird (New 08/01/2018)
DUNFORD, Richard Jack (Revised 19/11/2017)
DUNN, Joseph Gordon * (Revised 19/12/2017)
DUTFIELD, Herbert Charles (Revised 21/12/2017)
DWAN, Arthur William * (Revised 02/12/2017)

* = Not included in the Book of Remembrance for reasons unknown.
If you are looking for someone whose name starts with a different letter please try:



Content


DANIELL, Michael Charles. Flight Sergeant (761087)

209 Squadron Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 22 February 1941, aged 23

Michael was born on 7 April 1917, the son of Charles William Daniell and Mary Winifred (née Brogdale) of 27 High Street, Epsom and baptised in Christ Church on 27 May. That was barely a month after his father had been invalided out of the Royal Artillery, in which he had been Gunner 152632 - probably leading to his early death in 1924, aged 40. His widow then continued the eponymous family newsagents in Epsom High Street.

209 Squadron was stationed at Oban, on the west coast of Scotland, flying patrols over the North Atlantic in newly-commissioned Saunders-Roe A.36 Lerwick "flying boats". The aircraft was found to have many shortcomings - not least its inability to maintain either height or heading if one of its two engines failed - and 11 of the 21 Lerwicks were lost or written off during the three years the type saw operational service.

One of 209 Squadron's Lerwicks (L7265 - WQ-Q) taking off on 1 March 1941
One of 209 Squadron's Lerwicks (L7265 - WQ-Q) taking off on 1 March 1941
Photograph (CH2363) courtesy of the Imperial War Museum

One of the losses was Michael's plane L7263 (WQ-L) which, while on patrol in good weather on 22 February 1942, went missing with its crew of 14.

Michael is commemorated on the RAF Memorial at Runnymede which records the names of over 20,000 people who were lost in WW2 operations and who have no known graves.

In Q2 1940, before joining the RAF, Michael had married Abina Sarah (née Kell) in Paddington. She seems never to have remarried, dying Q4 1998 in Barnet.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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DAVIS, Edward Strangways. Sergeant 575812

467 (R.A.A.F.) Royal Air Force
Died 28 May 1943 Age 20

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of John and Muriel Strangways Davis, of West Ewell, Surrey.

Buried: Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Coll. grave 22. E. 9-13.

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DAVIS, Ernest Burchett.

Civilian
Died 4 October 1940 Age 37

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Husband of Ellen Davis, of 267 Worcester Park Road, Epsom. Died at Canbury Park Road.

Buried: Kingston Upon Thames, Municipal Borough,

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DAVIS, Ernest John Walter. Flight Sergeant/Pilot (1254697)

9 Squadron Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 18 February 1943, aged 24

The marriage of Ernest John Davis to Henrietta Florence Reid was registered at Fulham for the June Quarter of 1912. Birth of their son, Ernest John Walter Davis, came to be recorded in Fulham 6/1917.

By 1934 the family had arrived locally to live at Sesame, 92 Bradstock Road, Stoneleigh.

Ernest, junior, entered the Civil Service as a Clerical Officer on 31 May 1935 by Open Competition.

With a Service Number of 1254697 he would have enlisted with the Royal Air Force, probably at Uxbridge, in or after Sepember 1940.

His union with Eileen Rachel Siddons is found registered in Uxbridge, 6/1941. Arrival of their son, Michael Richard Davis, was recorded at Uxbridge, 12/1942.

In August 1942, a detachment from No 10 OTU Abingdon was sent to RAF St Eval, Cornwall, to join Coastal Command and participate in anti-submarine patrols in the Bay of Biscay.

An Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Mk V, Z6645 - JL-V of 10 OTU departed from St Eval on 22 August 1942 crewed by: -
Sgt. Ernest John Walter Davis - Pilot
Sgt David P. P. Hurst,
Sgt James Vaughan,
Sgt James Storey Aird - navigator,
Sgt. John A. Jones-Ford
Sgt. Thomas Alfred Berwick - gunner.
Reportedly, it had taken off at 07:05 but, about 15:30, started having problems with the starboard engine which failed at 16:00. The plane ditched in the sea at 16:30 and all boarded a life- raft. At 13:15 the next day they were rescued by a Spanish fishing boat and were landed in Corunna two days later. The crew were interned at various locations until on 20 September 1942 making an escape into Gibraltar.

On 18 February 1943, a 9 Sqn RAF Lancaster ED492 from RAF Waddington was hit by flak from 2 Marine Flak Brigade and crashed at Schreiersort, N. of Jever at 20.45 hrs.

Three of the crew were killed:-
Sgt E J W Davis,
Sgt J W Aird
Sgt R W Darlington.
To be buried near Jever on 22 February 1943.

Sgts H W Fullard, J Vaughan & J A Jones Ford were taken Prisoners of War. Sgt Fullard suffered very severe injuries and a leg was amputated in order to save his life.

Remains of the deceased airmen were later recovered for interment at Sage War Cemetery, Niedersachsen. Ernest is recorded as a son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Davis; husband of Eileen Rachel Davis, of Hayes, Middlesex.

His headstone bears an inscription 'BELOVED HUSBAND OF EILEEN RACHEL FATHER OF MICHAEL RICHARD REST IN PEACE'

For Probate, his address was stated as 59 St Mary's Road, Hayes and the deceased's Estate was administered by William Siddons, a rounds foreman.

Brian Bouchard © 2017

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DAVIS, Herbert George. Fireman and Trimmer

S.S. Pennington Court (London) Merchant Navy
Died 9 October 1942 Age 33

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Husband of M. E. Davies, of Epsom, Surrey.

Commemorated: Tower Hill Memorial, Panel 80.

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DAVIS Victor George

Civilian
Died 24 December 1940, aged 29

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Victor was born on 31 January 1911, the second child of William Alfred E Davis and Florence Sophia (née Spinks - they had married Q2 1906 in Poplar, London). The 1911 Census records Alfred (a "Commercial Clerk" for a miller) and Florence living in Church Street, Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex, together with their two children: 4 your old Leonard and new-born Victor.

Alfred died in 1928. The 1939 Register records the widowed Florence living at 8 East Holme, Northumberland Heath, Erith, Kent. She is listed with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". The 28 year old and unmarried Victor is living with her, listed as "Incapacitated - Metallurgist before illness". There is a currently closed record immediately below his, perhaps a younger sibling. The last entry at the address is the 92 year old widow Sarah Spinks, presumably Florence's mother.

At some point, it seems Victor was injured by enemy action - perhaps during the Blitz that had begun in September 1940. He was taken to Horton Emergency Hospital, one of Epsom's cluster of mental hospitals that, during both World Wars, was taken over for military use. He died there on Christmas Eve 1940.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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DAVISON, Norman John. Trooper 7892833

4th County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters) Royal Armoured Corps
Died 19 November 1941 Age 23

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of William and Elizabeth Jane Davison, of Ewell, Surrey.

Buried: Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Acroma, 4. G. 11.

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DAY, Alec Ronald. Corporal (7882766)

4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards. Royal Armoured Corps
Died 10 April 1945, aged 31

Alec's headstone in the Rheinberg War Cemetery
Alec's headstone in the Rheinberg War Cemetery
Photograph by Des Philippet, via findagrave.com

Alec was born Q2 1913, the fourth child of wheelwright Frederick Walter Day Evelyn Victoria Maud (née Mutton - they had married Q1 1898 in Milton, Kent). In Q3 1937, Alec married Beatrice Mary James, registered in Wandsworth. The couple set up home in 18 Heatherside Road, West Ewell - which is where the 1939 Register records the 27 year old Beatrice, listed as a shorthand typist at multiple departmental stores.. Living with Beatrice were her parents, 76 year old Henry (a retired blindmaker) and 67 year old Edith listed with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties"

The 26 year old Alec was not recorded there, and is likely already to have been serving in the 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards in the Royal Armoured Corps. Equipped with Vickers Mk.VI light tanks, they were deployed to France with the British Expeditionary Force performing reconnaissance duties They fought in northern France and Belgium during the Battle of France and, having abandoned their vehicles, were evacuated from Dunkirk landing in England on 3 June 1940.

The regiment later re-equipped with Sherman DD amphibious tanks. These had waterproof float screens which, when raised, enabled the tank to float and be driven through water using their rear propellers. (The DD in the tank's name was the abbreviation for Duplex Drive, but they became known as "Donald Ducks".)

A Sherman DD amphibious tank with its float screen lowered.
A Sherman DD amphibious tank with its float screen lowered.
IWM photograph MH 3660. Public domain.

Good use of these were made of these during the 6 June 1944 D-Day landings. As part of the 8th Armoured Brigade, the regiment landed on King Green, Gold Beach, at 0720 (not even an hour after the first landings at 0630), supporting the 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division. It was among the front rank of all the advances eastwards - among other notable achievements, being the first armoured unit to cross the Seine. The regiment later participated in the Battle for the Falaise Gap, and as part of the armoured forces in Operation Market Garden in September 1944 - pushing as far as Driel, on the south bank of the Rhine only a couple of miles from the "bridge too far" at Arnhem.

Allied forces eventually crossed the Rhine in late March 1945 and began advancing to the Elbe. Alec was killed in action on 10 April 1945, less than a month before VE Day on 8 May. He is buried in the Rheinberg War Cemetery, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany - one of 3,330 Commonwealth WW2 servicemen buried or commemorated there.

The family took the option of adding a personal tribute to his headstone: "Always alive in our memory. Your loving wife, son, parents and family" - the son being his only child, Christopher, born Q1 1945, very shortly before Alec's death.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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DAY, Ernest. Private (5624530)

1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment
Died 20 November 1943, aged 22

Ernest Day was born in the December quarter of 1919 in the Epsom registration district (GRO reference: Dec 1919 Underdown Epsom 2a 66).

The 1911 census records Ernest's father, born in Hertford in 1888, as a 23 year old attendant at Horton asylum. His mother, born in Sutton in 1892, was a 20 year old laundry maid at Horton asylum.

Ernest's parents married in the June quarter of 1914 in the Epsom registration district.

ERNEST DAY AND HIS SIBLINGS
NameBorn - DiedNotes
Donald AlfredBorn: 26 October 1914Baptised 23 April 1916, St. Barnabas
William JamesBorn: 3 February 1916Baptised 23 April 1916, St. Barnabas
ErnestBorn: 1919 Epsom
Died: 20 November 1943 India
 
Enid MBorn: 1922 Epsom 
ReginaldBorn: 1924 Epsom 

When Ernest's siblings Donald and William were baptised on 23 April 1916 the family lived at 57 Horton Hill and his father was described as an orderly.

The electoral registers record Ernest's parents living at 'Davenett', Horton Hill from 1935 until 1945, when they were recorded as living at 76 Horton Hill.

The 1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment was in India when the Second World War broke out and served throughout the war in India, Ceylon and Burma. It is not known when Ernest joined the unit.

Imphal was the capital of Manipur and, in 1943 was the location of British IV Corps which formed part of the newly-created 14th Army. The 1st Devons were in 80th Brigade of the 20th Indian Division, and defended several vital hilltop positions. Ernest was killed on 20 November 1943, before the campaign in Burma came to a crisis in the spring of 1944. By that time the Empire troops facing the Japanese were properly equipped and trained for the job. Commanded by Bill Slim, they destroyed the Japanese offensive at Imphal, and went on to drive them out of Burma completely.

Ernest was buried in Plot 9. A. 4. of Imphal War Cemetery, India.

Ernest is commemorated in the Book of Remembrance in the foyer of the Town Hall and on the St. Barnabas Roll of Honour.

Clive Gilbert & Hazel Ballan 2014

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DAY, John Terence Gordon. Lieutenant (265919)

1st Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers
Died 2 December 1943, aged 20

John's headstone in the Sangro River War Cemetery
John's headstone in the Sangro River War Cemetery.
Photograph from findagrave.com, posted there anonymously.

John was born Q1 1923, the son of Richard Day and Agnes (née O'Brien). The birth was registered in Brentford Middlesex, but it is not possible from the readily available records to track down the family background with any confidence. Sadly, both his parents died, and he was taken in by his maternal uncle, Terence O'Brien, and his wife Catherine ("Kitty") Viola (née Peppercorn). They had married Q2 1933, registered in Kensington, and seem to have had no children of their own.

The 1939 Register records the 33 year old Terence (listed as "Surveyor & Estate Agent") living at "White Gables", Longdown Lane South, Epsom Downs. There is one currently closed record at the address - likely to be the 16 year old John. For some reason, Kitty is not recorded there, but her 63 year old widowed mother (of "Independent means") is. The household is supported by a domestic servant.

John's WW2 service was in the 1st Battalion of the Royal Irish Fusiliers. It is not currently clear when he began active service, but this was is likely to have been in time to help driving Axis powers out of Tunisia as a base for the July 1943 invasion of Sicily. The hard-won success there was followed by Allied landings on the Italian mainland. (That invasion coincided with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side.) During its service in Italy, the battalion took part in many river crossings and battles.

He is buried in the Sangro River War Cemetery, on the Adriatic coast of Italy - one of 2,617 Commonwealth men who died in the fierce fighting on the Adriatic sector of the front in November-December 1943, and during the static period that followed. His uncle and aunt took the option of adding a personal text to his headstone: "Son of the late R and A Day. Dearly loved nephew of Terence & Kitty O'Brien. RIP"

Roger Morgan © 2017

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DE JONGH, Oscar Geoffreij. Flying Officer 139692

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 22 November 1943 Age 26

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Reportedly Oscar was born on 14 July 1917 at Smyrna, Izmir, Tukey to Eric and Eva de Jongh. In Levantine Heritage - http://www.levantineheritage.com/testi21.htm - it is explained :-
"Eric de Jongh the son of Oscar John de Jongh, was a charming, outgoing person with a sense of humour and the most popular de Jongh in Smyrna, highly thought of in business … Eric originally married in the 1910s, but divorced before WWII, a lady from Smyrna of Armenian background, Eva Sadjian, a lady of extraordinary beauty, with whom he had 2 children, Geoffrey and Winifred. Eva accompanied the British Attaché to Greece and his wife in the evacuation of that country in WWII, and would mesmerize onlookers with her sultry dark looks even in early morning rising out of her tent in Crete, on route to Egypt. She later re-married an American diplomat, Arthur Parsons….

Geoffrey de Jongh, the son of Eric de Jongh, also applied to the air force was also killed, again not in combat but in an air crash. Unfortunately Geoffrey had married shortly before and his heartbroken wife was carrying a baby when he died. The child, Geoffrey David de Jongh, grew up to be a charming man who worked for a chemical company in Holland."
Oscar was an 'Engelandvaarder' the term applied to men and women who, during World War II, escaped from occupied territory to England, or another Allied territory, to join the Allied forces in order to continue the fight against Axis countries. He appears to have been a Reserve 2nd Lieutenant in the Dutch Air Force.

On 22 November 1943, he was at 82 Operational training Unit, RAF, and was aboard a Wellington Mk X, LN601 - B, which took off fron 2158 from Desborough on an operation to drop leaflets in the St Nazaire region of France. Having ascended to about 800 ft, the port engine failed and the aircraft plunged to the ground at Norwell Woods House near Kneeshall Lodge. On impact there was an explosion and the bomber went up in flames.

Its crew:-
WO2 Harold Winthrop Johnson RCAF - Pilot,
F/O Oscar Geoffreij De Jongh RAFVR - Navigator,
P/O Alexander Grant RCAF - Air Bomber,
F/Sgt Kenneth Ross Fallowdown RCAF - Wireless Op / Gunner,
F/Lt John Gordon Brassington RAFVR - Gunner
Sgt Robert James Wannell RAFVR - Gunner
were all killed. F/Lt Brassington was the unit's Gunnery Leader.

WO2 Johnson, F/O De Jongh, P/O Grant & F/Sgt Fallowdown are buried at Ollerton Cemetery, Notts. Oscar lies in Cons. Portion. Grave 1209.

Oscar's headstone in Ollerton Cemetery
Oscar's headstone in Ollerton Cemetery
Photograph by Stephen Farnell via findagrave.com.

Oscar's marriage to Marguerite Dart (born 21 March 1920) had been registered at Southwell for the December Quarter of 1943 athough administration of his small Estate was granted to 'Lily May' de Jongh, widow. She could have been a WAAF on the station because birth of her son, Geoffrey David de Jongh, came to be recorded at Totnes, 6/1944, possibly because she had returned home to her parents for that event. She died on 18 June 1977 at 5 Langridge Road, Paignton as Margerite Lilian De Jongh.

CWGC records Oscar as the husband of Marguerite de Jongh, of Epsom, Surrey, but no local address for her has been located..

Brian Bouchard © 2018

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DEAN, Albert Edward. Warrant Officer Class I 394900

Royal Armoured Corps
Died 1 October 1944 Age 43

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Edward and Jane Dean; husband of Florence Ethel Dean, of Epsom, Surrey.

Buried: Bari War Cemetery, VII. E. 7.

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DENYER, William Arthur John. Private (6018478)

2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment.
Died 10 June 1940, aged 17

William was born Q4 1918 the second (and last) child of William Denyer and Lucy Ann (née Harris - they married Q4 1915, registered in the Epsom District). The 1939 Register records the parents living at 13 West Street, Ewell. William senior (born 15 June 1894) is listed as "Horse Carman Brickyard" and Lucy Ann (born 11 March 1889) as "Charwoman". Living with them is their first child, Lucy M (born 27 August 1916), engaged in "Daily Work".

The 21 year old William junior was doubtless already serving in the 2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment which, as part of the 25th Infantry Brigade, served with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in France.

Men of the 2nd Battalion Essex Regiment, Meurchin, France, 27 April 1940
Men of the 2nd Battalion Essex Regiment, Meurchin, France, 27 April 1940
IWM photograph F 4117 Pubic Domain.

The German invasion of Belgium and France was expected but, when this began on 10 May, the Allies were insufficiently prepared for its rapidity. The BEF made a fighting retreat to Dunkirk, from where very substantial numbers were evacuated in the 26 May to 4 June 1940 Operation Dynamo. However, there were many casualties in the fighting along the way. William was reported missing on 18 May and it appears that, like a number of others, he found himself behind German lines and tried to find his way back to the UK. It seems that he had teamed up with the similarly placed Private Albert Leslie Haddon (5885102) of the Northamptonshire Regiment but these two failed. They were both killed on 10 June 1940 - although the report of their deaths was not received until 1942.

William and Albert are the only Commonwealth WW2 burials in the St. Paer Communal Cemetery, Seine-Maritime, France. William's parents took up the option of adding a personal inscription to his headstone: "Never shall thy memory fade. Sweet thoughts ever linger where thou art laid."

Roger Morgan © 2017

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DENYER, William Charles. Trooper (6918688)

18th (5th Battalion The Loyal Regiment) Regiment, Reconnaissance Corps.
Died 29 November 1943, aged 27.

William was born 2 July 1916, at least the fourth child (one of whom one had died) of William Charles Denyer and Alice Mary (née Breeze - they had married Q3 1905, registered in Fulham). The birth was registered in the Wandsworth District, but this covered Streatham where, in the 1911 census, the parents (with William senior as a "Greengrocers Assistant") and two older children were recorded at 77 Hambro Road. That was also where William Senior was "of" when as a WW1 Private (84379) in the Machine Gun Corps, he was killed in France on 28 September 1918.

The 1939 Register records the widowed Alice - with William junior - living with her oldest son Ernest and his wife Florence at 99 Edenfield Gardens, Worcester Park. William's occupation is listed as "Clerk & Librarian Assistance in Chemical Laboratory".

In Q3 1941 and registered in the Wandsworth District, William married Thelma I Donoyou. The couple appear not to have had any children. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records note that the widowed Thelma was "of" Danbury, Essex.

William's WW2 service was in the Reconnaissance Corps, and his marriage to Thelma was shortly before his Battalion was, following inspection by King George VI on 22 October 1941, despatched on a roundabout route from the UK to help resist then anticipated Japanese aggression in the Far East. (Japan declared war on both the UK and the USA on 7 December 1941, the date of its surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.)

Their convoy was attacked as they approached Singapore in early February 1942. Survivors, including William, joined in the effort to resist the Japanese advance but without success. Singapore was surrendered to the Japanese Army on 15 February and William was one of the many taken prisoner of war. It seems likely that he was initially in the PoW camp at Changi and then taken to work on the infamous Bangkok-Rangoon "Death Railway". He survived past its mid-1943 completion, after which surviving PoWs were put to work in labour camps.

Conditions for these POWs were extremely harsh and William died on 29 November 1943. As he has no known grave, he is one of more than 24,000 Commonwealth casualties commemorated on the Singapore Memorial in Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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DICKINSON, Frederick. Gunner 802594

124 Field Regt. Royal Artillery
Died 25 March 1944 Age 34

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Isaac and Esther Jane Dickinson; husband of Margaret Dickinson, of West Ewell, Surrey.

Buried: Padua War Cemetery, I. E. 9.

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DIXON, Reginald John. Corporal 5624338

2/7th Bn. The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey)
Died 20 September 1944 Age 24

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of Thomas John and Amy Dixon; husband of Amy Sophia Dixon, of Ewell, Surrey.

Buried: Gradara War Cemetery, II, D, 20.

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DONALDSON, Charles Alexander. Lance Corporal (6141079)

2nd Battalion, East Surrey Regiment
Died 24 February 1945, aged 27

Charles was born in Newcastle on 30 March 1917, the son of Alex and Martha Donaldson. Details of the family background have, so far, proved resistant to a range of routinely available searches. Some available Forces records show Charles's pre-service residence to have been in Cumberland (now part of Cumbria) and that he worked as a stableman.

The parents are, however, found in the 1939 Register living at 25 Beech Road, Epsom. Alexander (born 24 April 1885) is listed as a "General Labourer" and Martha (born 21 July 1889) with the conventional "Unpaid Domestic Duties". Living with them was the 24 year old C Crumlish, an apparently unrelated "General Labourer". (There is also one currently closed record at the address but, as that is listed below Crumlish, it shouldn't be a member of the Donaldsons' family.)

The readily available records do not indicate when Charles took up duties in the East Surrey Regiment's 2nd Battalion. At the September 1939 outbreak of WW2 in Europe, this was stationed in Shanghai - presumably guarding the then British Concession there which, although Japan had been at war with China since 1937 (and with skirmishing since 1931), the Japanese had so far respected. In August 1940, the Battalion was moved to Malaya. After an initial period on Singapore Island, it was moved north, almost to the border with Siam (now Thailand) to join other troops. In June 1941, work began on a defensive line to run east and west, north of Jitra, designed to protect the Alor Star airfield.

On 7 December 1941, Japanese forces launched surprise attacks on not only Pearl Harbor but also Manila, Shanghai and Hong Kong. They also landed in Southern Thailand and at Badang on the north east coast of Malaya. In very heavy rain, work was redoubled on completing the so-called "Jitra Line" but it was still incomplete when, on the evening of 10 December, Japanese forces attacked across the northern border of Malaya. Supported by tanks, they quickly overran the forward Allied troops. A night withdrawal to a reserve line was ordered, but the enemy had now blocked the main road bridge to the south, causing many wheeled and tracked vehicles to be abandoned.

Heavy Allied losses were incurred in seeking to impede the Japanese advance southwards but to no avail. The strategically important island of Singapore - and the surviving Allied troops, including Charles, now concentrated there - were surrendered to the Japanese on 15 February 1942.

British Commanders on their way to surrender Singapore, 15 February 1942
British Commanders on their way to surrender Singapore, 15 February 1942
IWM photograph HU 2781 Pubic Domain.

It is not clear whether, like many PoWs, Charles was put to work on the infamous "Death Railway". However, some months before its completion, he was transferred on 1 April 1943 to the Malai 1 PoW camp on Borneo. Conditions in Japanese PoW camps were extremely harsh, and Charles died on 24 February 25.

He has no known grave and, as one of the more than 24,000 such casualties of the land and air forces of the Commonwealth who died during the campaigns in Malaya and Indonesia, is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial in Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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DORMAN, Kenneth Frederick Edward. Lieutenant (A)

HMS Victorious, Fleet Air Arm, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.
Died 19 December 1944, aged 23

Kenneth Dorman taken 4 January 1943
Kenneth Dorman taken 4 January 1943 on board HMS Formidable.
Image Source : © IWM (A 14202)

The marriage of Edward Joseph Dorman and Daisy Louise Cook was registered in Hackney for the September Quarter of 1915. Birth of their son Kenneth F. E. Dorman followed at Ashby de la Zouch, 6/1921. It appears that the death of Daisy Louise Dorman occurred in Doncaster at the end of 1923 and Edward married secondly Ellen Hughes, reg. Lichfield 9/1932.

The Dorman family had arrived in Surrey by 1936, to reside at 'Lucerne', 136 Reigate Road, Ewell.

No. 31 Service Flying Training School in the small town of Gananoque, 18 miles east of the city of Kingston, Ontario, became the home of the first R.A.F. pilot training school which moved to Canada out of England. K. F. E. Dorman from Ewell, Surrey, was among the forty-seven graduates of No. 10 Course in the Canadian Fleet Air Arm training school who received their wings in June 1941. Subsequently Kenneth served as a pilot in 818 and 820 Squadrons.

By 4 January 1943 he was aboard the aircraft carrier HMS Formidable.

The British Pacific Fleet was as formed at Trincomalee on 22 November 1944 from elements of the Eastern Fleet including HMS Victorious. On 19 November 1944, HMS Victorious left Trincomalee to carry out gunnery exercises and to embark 21 Grumman Avengers of 849 Squadron. The ship went to 'flying stations' just after 2pm and ten of the new aircraft landed safely. At 2.50 pm, however, one of the Avengers suddenly swerved to port as the pilot approached the flight deck and as the aircraft ditched over the side it hit and killed the Deck Landing Control Officer Lt. K. F. E. Dorman who then fell into the sea. Fortunately, the injured aircrew of the Avenger, Sub Lt. G R Winch, and Sub Lt. C R Tipler, were recovered from the water by HMS Rapid.

HMS Victorious shortly after arriving at Ford Island, Pearl Harbour, in March 1943.
HMS Victorious shortly after arriving at Ford Island, Pearl Harbour, in March 1943.
Image source: www.armouredcarriers.com

Remembered on the Lee-On-Solent Memorial, Hampshire. Lee-On-Solent was the principal base of the Fleet Air Arm, and the memorial commemorates almost 2,000 men of that service who died during the Second World War and who have no known grave.

Avenger and later crash
Avenger and later crash.
Image source: Wikimedia.org

Administration of Kenneth's personal estate, effects £382:5:7, was granted to his father, Edward Joseph Dorman, Chairman of Liverpool Victoria Friendly Society [who survived until 1966].

Brian Bouchard © 2017

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DOWLING, Harry Walter. Gunner (1476386)

226 Battery, 57 (1/5th The East Surrey Regiment) Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Artillery
Died 25 May 1940, aged 25

Harry Walter Dowling's birth was registered in the September quarter of 1914 in the Ongar registration district in Essex (GRO reference: Sep 1914 Mccloed Ongar 4a 1044). Harry's father, Harry Victor Dowling was born 1887 in Wescott, Surrey, and his mother Laura Sophia Mcloed was born 1885 in Peckham.

In the 1901 census Harry's father was a 13 year old 'Farm Boy', living at 4 The Flats, High Road, Ashtead and his mother was a 15 year old 'Housemaid Domestic', living at 8 North Street, Bromley. However, they have not been found in the 1911 census.

Harry's parents married in the December quarter of 1912 in the Chelmsford registration district. The birth of Harry's brother, Allan S. V. Dowling, was registered in the December 1916 quarter in the Ongar registration district.

Between 1934 and 1945 Harry's parents lived at 281 Hook Road.

Harry was an employee of Epsom and Ewell Council and it seems likely that he was a part time soldier in the Territorial Army. Harry died whilst serving with the Royal Artillery (RA) in the 226th Battery, 57th Anti-Tank Regiment. This unit was formed in 1938 when the Territorial unit, the 1/5th Battalion East Surrey Regiment was converted to artillery to become the 57th (East Surrey) Anti-Tank Regiment, RA, which was part of the 44th (Home Counties) Infantry Division, in the III Corps British Expeditionary Force (BEF), during 1940.

Harry was killed during the retreat of the BEF through France and was initially reported as missing. In 1940 St. Venant was the centre of heavy fighting when delaying actions covered the withdrawal of the BEF to Dunkirk (26 May to 4 June 1940). In fact British troops continued fighting at St. Venant after the evacuation of Dunkirk, and 90 or more were buried in a mass grave in a field at St. Venant.

Harry is buried in Plot 4. Row C. Grave 33, St. Venant Communal Cemetery.

The Epsom Herald dated 20 June 1940 printed the following:
DOWLING. In loving memory of our eldest son Harry, killed in action in his 26th year. Mum, Dad and Allan. Always remembered.
Probate of Harry's effects, valued at £60 2s. 4d., was given on 13 November to his father who was working as a milkman.

Harry is commemorated in the Book of Remembrance in the foyer of the Town Hall, the wooden plaque commemorating Council employees, also in the foyer of the Town Hall and on the St. Barnabas Roll of Honour.

Clive Gilbert & Hazel Ballan 2014

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DOWNWARD, Arthur Cyril Reid. Pilot Officer (105178)

103 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.
Died 23 June 1942, aged 30

The marriage of Arthur Edward Downward and Lucy Mabel Reid was registered at Lambeth for the June Quarter of 1911. Their son, Arthur Cyril Reid Downward was brought to to be baptised at St Andrew's, Carshalton on 25 November 1911 when the family were living at Ellesmere, Carshalton, Hill (b. reg, Croydon 12/1911).

A Service Number 1164827 indicates that he enlisted with the Roal Air Force at Cardington in or after April 1940.

His marriage to Norah Sells (b. reg. West Ham 9/1909?) came to be registered in Surrey Mid E in the September Quarter of 1940. She lived at North View, Seymour Avenue, East Ewell.

Arthur was commissoned as a Pilot Officer during 1941.

He was aboard a Vickers Wellington DV818 of 103 Squadron which ook off at 23.08 hours from RAF Elsham Wolds, Lincolnshire to bomb Emden and was lost during the night 22/23 June 1942.

Crew:-
W/C O Godfrey, DFC, - Pilot,
Sgt V J Gallogly, RAAF, - Co-pilot,
P/O A C R Downward - Observer,
F/Sgt H G Edwards - W Op/Bomb aimer,
Sgt J W Porteous - W Op/AG
Sgt F E Barnett - Air Gunner.
Their aircraft went down into the North Sea, N.W. of Terschelling, Holland. Reportedly shot down at 01.12 by NF Hptm. H. Lent of II/NJG 2.

The body of Wing Commander Oliver Godfrey, pilot, aged 26, was washed up near Wierhuizen on 12 July 1942 and buried at Wierhuizen Protestant Cemetery, in the former municipality of Eenrum (now De Marne), province of Groningen,Netherlands.

Sgt. Porteous, aged 19, is interred at the Sage Cemetery, Oldenburg, Niedersachsen, Germany.

Sgt. Vincent John Gallogly RAAF, aged 23, Pilot Officer Arthur Cyril Reid Downward, aged 30 & Flight Sgt H G Edwards are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, which commemorates more than 20,000 airmen and women who were lost in WW2 operations from bases in the United Kingdom and North and Western Europe, and who have no known grave.

Sgt. F.E. Barnett survived and became a POW.

Described as son of Arthur Edward and Lucy Mabel Downward; husband of Norah Downward, of Ewell, Surrey. Address for Probate 16 Melrose Road, Coulsdon: Admin. Norah Downward, widow.

Brian Bouchard © 2017

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DRUMMOND, Clifford John. Lieutenant 73421

Hampshire Regiment
Died 21 July 1943 Age 23

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of David and Elizabeth Drummond, of Ilford, Essex; husband of Joan Mary Drummond, of Epsom, Surrey.

Buried: Mosul War Cemetery, 1. C. 2.

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DUNBAR, James Laird. Sergeant 1585541

514 Sqdn. Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 22 May 1944 Age 21

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Son of James Laird Dunbar and Miriam F. Dunbar; husband of Eirene M. Dunbar, of West Ewell, Surrey.

Buried: Cambridge City Cemetery, Grave 13566.

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DUNFORD, Richard Jack. Flying Officer/Pilot (124945)

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died Died 07 April 1943, aged 24

James Thomas Dunford married Annie Tucker at Epsom in 1908 but their son Richard was not born until 5 April 1919. He attended Sutton County School before going up to King's College, London, during 1937. By that date the family were living at 27 Hook Road, Epsom, now the St John's Ambulance Brigade Depot.

Richard left University in 1939 to enlist with the Royal Artillery but transferred to the Royal Air Force with a service number 657898. On 24 June 1942, from Flight Sergeant, he became a Pilot Officer (Emergency) and was appointed Flying Officer on probation (War substitute), 26 December 1942.

On 7 April 1943, 124945 F/0 R J Dunford RAF (Pilot) and two others drowned when a Sunderland II, W6001, of 4 (Coastal) Operational Training Unit broke her moorings at 05:25 in a gale at Alness and sank. He had been acting as one of the three 'plane guards' - in command of LAC Francis William Dummigan - 1501094 aged 20 & W/O Leslie D. Jones - 580204 aged 30.
"APRIL 7TH. - CROMARTY. At 6.35 in the morning a message came from the R.A.F. that several of their seaplanes had broken adrift from their moorings, with their crews aboard, that they had not enough boats to face the storm, and that they would be glad of the life-boat's immediate help. A strong N.W. gale was blowing, with a rough sea, and there were heavy showers of sleet. The motor life-boat James Macfee was launched at 7.15, went to the seaplane base, took two R.A.F. officers on board, and then patrolled round the seaplanes and gave them valuable help. They were all made safe except one, which had foundered. The life-boat searched the firth for her crew of six men, but they had all been drowned." [In fact a second aircraft had been lost, a Catalina AH568, killing watch crew, Sgt N K Carew and Sgt E Havron who would have been included in the suggested total.]
R J Dunford's date of death is also found recorded as 20 May 1943 apparently because his body was then washed ashore.

Buried in the Rosskeen Parish Churchyard Extensions which are close to the north shore of Cromarty Firth, between Invergordon and Alness, Ross and Cromarty, Scotland.

Administration of his estate, effects £284:1:5, (£284.07) was granted to his mother, Annie wife of James Thomas Dunford.

Commemorated at King' s College Chapel, Sutton Grammar School & St. Martin's Church, Epsom.

Brian Bouchard © 2017

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DUNN Joseph Gordon. Constable

Metropolitan Police
Died 29 June 1944, aged 41

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Joseph was born on 15 September 1902, son of engine driver James William and Jessie Florence Dunn of 10 Vanguard Terrace in the Ford area of Devonport, Devon (details from the record of Joseph's 30 September 1902 baptism at St Mark's Church, Ford). While a record has been found of Joseph's 1911 admission to the St David's Church of England First School, Exeter, the family are not readily found in the 1911 Census.

In Q2 1932, Joseph married Dorothy Cunningham Turner. The marriage was registered in the Epsom District, as was the birth of their son John in Q4 1932.

The 1939 Register records Joseph (now a Metropolitan Police Constable) living at 1 Oxford Close, Mitcham. Neither his wife nor child was there - although the address is where the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's post-war records list the widowed Dorothy as being "of" - and are not readily found elsewhere. (The only other occupant of 1 Oxford Close in 1939 Register was the 20 year old unmarried "Pay Clerk" David Bennett.)

On 22 June 1944, Joseph (who is understood to have been off duty) was injured by enemy action at the junction of Manor Way and Rowan Road, Mitcham - about three quarters of a mile from his home in Oxford Close. He was taken to Horton Emergency Hospital (one of Epsom's cluster of mental hospitals that, during both World Wars, was taken over for military use) and died there on 29 June 1944.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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DUTFIELD, Herbert Charles. Flying Officer/Air Bomber (154376)

186 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Died 16 January 1945, aged 23

The marriage of Frederick W T Dutfield to Harriet Gibbons was registered at Uxbridge for the September Quarter of 1916. Birth of their son Herbert C Dutfield came to be recorded in the same District, 6/1921.

A Service Number 1324220 suggestes that he enlisted with rhe RAF in or after November 1940. He advanced fron LAC to commission as a Pilot officer on 26 November 1943 before promotion to Flying Officer, 26 May 1944.

A marriage to Patricia M McGrath had been recorded in Surrey Mid E District for the March Quarter of 1944. She appears to have come from Ewell but neither the names of her parents nor their address has been established.

A Lancaster NG147, AP-C, of 186 Squadron left RAF Stradishall at 23.15 on 16 January1945 for a raid on a synthetic oil plant at Wanne-Eickel but crashed and exploded 3 miinutes later at Kedington nr Haverhill in Suffolk killing all seven of the crew:-
F/Lt R R Tait, Pilot,
Sgt P A Sumpter, F/Eng
F/Sgt T B Darney, Navigator,
F/O H C Dutfield, Air Bomber,
F/Sgt W S Gamble W/Op.,
P/O G S Haslam, Mu/Gunner
Sgt T L Lenton, Tail Gunner.
Further details are recorded on the Aircrew Remembered website - http://aircrewremembered.com/tait-ralph-roland.html

Herbert was buried in Haverhill Cemetery, Suffolk, Sec. U, Grave 149 as a son of Frederick and Harriet Dutfield; husband of Patricia R. Dutfield, of Ewell, Surrey.

His headstone bears the inscription 'IN MEMORY OF HERBERT CHARLES BELOVED HUSBAND OF PATRICIA. ONE WE LOVED AND SHALL NEVER FORGET'

Brian Bouchard © 2017

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DWAN Arthur William

Civilian
Died 22/01/1941, aged 15

Not listed in the Book of Remembrance

Arthur was born on 18 November 1925, the eighth of twelve children born to George C Dwan and Lily S (née Turner). Their Q4 1914 marriage and the births of all their children were registered in the St Olave, Southwark District. The 1939 Register records the parents (with George as "Cereal Miller's Forman") and eight of their children - including 14 year old schoolboy Arthur - living at Rotherhithe Street, Rotherhithe.

After the Battle of Britain, the next phase of WW2 was the "Blitz", the Luftwaffe's bombing campaign against London and other major centres. This began with a daylight raid of the London Docks on 7 September 1940. There was great damage to the Docks and the surrounding area. Many of the surviving residents were evacuated to the nearby Keeton's Road School.

A second wave of the Blitz came that evening, during which the school received a direct hit. It is reported that some 400 of the evacuees were killed outright. Others, including the 14 year old Arthur (and Rose Bond) were injured. He was taken to the Horton Emergency Hospital at Epsom - one of Epsom's cluster of mental hospitals that, as for WW1, had been taken over for handling wartime casualties - and, four months later, died there from his injuries on 22 January 1941.

Roger Morgan © 2017

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