THE ODDMENTS

Victorian Studio Photos
Victorian Studio Photos


No, that isn't the name of a family: the term relates to people who lived out of our area (but we know who they are), people who lived out of our area (but we don't know who they are, although that doesn't always stop me guessing) and people about whom we don't have a clue, because the writing on the negative wrapper is unreadable, ambiguous or unhelpful. Any assistance concerning identification of some of the mystery people would be gratefully received!

We've divided them into two sub-categories as follows.

PART 1 - Sitters who lived out of our area but some lived nearby (identities known or possibly known).
Ashton, Mrs
Ashton, Mrs and child
Britton, William Fraser Cass
Dear, Mr and Mrs Arthur
Keeling, Mr
Killick, Mr
King, Mary
King, Mrs Rebecca Capstack
Lawford, Possibly Isabel Margaret
Lawford, Possibly Katharine Frances
Lawford, Possibly Mary Evelyn
Leith, Miss either Helen or Emily
Maynard, Miss Eliza
Middleton, Miss
Potts, Mrs
Smith, Miss Amelia Tomlin
Smith, Miss Emily
Smith, Miss Fanny Mary
Smith, Mrs Amelia
Smith, William
Waetzig, Miss Augusta
Willis, Miss Leith and Miss Willis
Wilson, Miss Emily Ann
PART 2 - Sitters who lived anywhere, identities unknown.
Alex
Cadywold, Miss
Eger, 'Mr Eger' of Ripley
Haworth, 'Miss Haworth' of Leatherhead
Hookway, Miss Hookway, Alexander's
Jarvis, 'Miss Jarvis' (doubtful)
Potts, 'Mr Potts' (doubtful)
Wheeler, Elizabeth
Wheeler, Mr Wheeler, The College
Willmot, Miss
Young, Miss

PART 1 - Sitters outside our area, identities known/possibly known


Ashtead

The King Family

Mrs Rebecca Capstack King
Mrs Rebecca Capstack King
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Rebecca Capstack Stone was born in Leatherhead in 1806 and married farmer William King in 1832. Mr King was born in Ashtead but farmed at Bramley. I think there were nine children altogether, nearly all of whom were at home in the 1861 census. Mr King died in 1847 and the family moved to Merry Hall, Ashtead. One of the King daughters was Mary (born Bramley 1841).

Miss Mary King
Miss Mary King
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

According to a family tree on Ancestry, Mary died early in 1872, but in any event Mrs King died on 20 December 1878 and was buried at St Giles, Ashtead.

Miss Eliza Maynard

Miss Eliza Maynard
Miss Eliza Maynard
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Amongst other things, the wrapper for this negative says that she is Mrs Hislop's friend, so I have based the identification on that. I don't think there's any doubt that the lady is Miss Maynard, even though the writing on the wrapper is rather peculiar.

Mrs Hislop operated a shop in Epsom High Street East, which was a Berlin Repository for needlework (this was embroidery in wool and Isabella Beeton wrote about it in her 1870 tome 'Beeton's Book of Needlework', published posthumously). Mrs Hislop also sold stationery, art supplies and assorted fancy goods. Her late husband, John Hislop, had been the gardener at Ashtead Park until his death in 1856 and all the Hislop children had been born in Ashtead.

Eliza Maynard, born c.1812 Maidstone, was the housekeeper at Ashtead Park for many years and she was there at the same time as the Hislops. Eliza died there on 21 February 1869, one of her executors being her brother George, who was butler to Henry, 3rd Earl Grey (son of the former Prime Minister and bergamot tea man).


Cheam

Mr Killick

Mr Killick, Cheam
Mr Killick, Cheam
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

This is probably William Killick, retired farmer, a lifelong Cheam resident. He was born there in 1775 and died there on 31 March 1863. If this is the right man he would be roughly 86 years old in the photo.

Mrs Potts

Mrs Potts, Cheam
Mrs Potts, Cheam
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The only Mrs Potts I can find to fit the rough date of the image and the age of the subject is Elizabeth, the wife of Charles John Potts, who was living at Swiss Cottage, Cheam in the early to mid-1860s. They were not in Cheam for censuses. Mr Potts was deaf and sold patent medicines by mail order (e.g. corn plasters and rheumatism cream). Mrs Potts was born Elizabeth Kingston in Toddington, Bedfordshire c.1823 and the marriage took place there in 1850. In the 1861 census they were in Brighton and by 1871 they lived in Ware, Hertfordshire. Mr Potts was born in Sevenoaks in 1823 and was the son of the Rev. Francis Brooke Potts, a Methodist minister. Charles Potts died in 1879 and his wife in 1889, both still in Ware.

Incidentally, Mr Potts advertised his products far and wide and had agents in 'nearly every town in the country', but you could get the plasters direct from him by sending 14 postage stamps for a small box or 33 for a large one. However, in 1867, a senior official at the GPO received information that such mail was 'going astray' so he made up two envelopes addressed to Mr Potts, one containing 108 stamps and the other 58, marked with some kind of invisible liquid. They arrived at Sutton Post Office but were not delivered and were traced to local letter carrier, Mark Stafford, who claimed he had found them in the road; he then sold them back to various other Post Offices and was found guilty. Perhaps that induced Mr and Mrs Potts to leave Cheam for Ware.

Sutton


The Smith Family

William Smith
William Smith
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Mrs Amelia Smith
Mrs Amelia Smith
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

William Smith, born in the City of London c.1820, was a metal broker who operated from 4 Brabant Court, Philpot Lane, which runs between Fenchurch Street and Eastcheap. This early 18th century building is still there and is Grade II listed. The Smiths' home was in Carshalton Road, Sutton and there were three daughters - Amelia Tomlin, Fanny Mary and Emily. Mrs Smith was also Amelia (née Tomlin), born c.1821 Deptford. The marriage took place in 1846 and the girls were born in London.

I am wondering if Mrs Smith was pregnant in the photo and, if so, this would probably give us a date of 1862. She had a son, William Stephen Montgomery Smith, in October 1862. It appears, but I have not been able to confirm absolutely, that this son first became a doctor and then a Christian Science healer; he may have spent some time in Canada. It seems that he latterly became a journalist and died in Scotland in 1936.

Mrs Amelia Smith died in 1868 and was buried at St Nicholas, Sutton. She was joined in August 1887 by her husband.

Miss Fanny Mary Smith
Miss Fanny Mary Smith
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Miss Emily Smith
Miss Emily Smith
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Miss Amelia Tomlin Smith
Miss Amelia Tomlin Smith
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The girls never married and remained together in Sutton, ultimately at Whyteleafe, Manor Park Road. Emily died first, being interred at St Nicholas on 19 April 1925, aged 73. Amelia followed in September of that year (79) and Fanny Mary was the last to go in November 1933, aged 84. Brother William was one of her executors.

London


Mrs Ashton (Brixton)

Mrs Ashton
Mrs Ashton
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

I've talked myself into a prime suspect for this one. We even have an address on the wrapper, which is 8 Hollan(sic) Crescent, Barrington Road, Brixton. This should be Holland Crescent, not that the correction helps us particularly.

In 1861, the nearest census to the date we think the photo was taken, the occupant of 8 Holland Crescent was a Miss Eliza Saunders, who had family connections to Marc Brunel (father of Isambard Kingdom Brunel). As we know, the Brunels were civil engineers and so was a gentleman called John Peter Ashton. Mrs Ashton was chemist's daughter Mary Ann Henly, born c.1838 Norwood or Fleet Street. John Creed Henly had his business premises in Fleet Street but the family tended to live in and around Lambeth. John P Ashton was away a lot on projects (for example, from 1864 to 1868 he was working on the Runcorn Railway Bridge and just over a decade earlier he seems to have been involved in construction of the Crystal Palace, so I am assuming he specialised in major ironworks). I think, therefore, that Mrs Ashton might well have moved around to various abodes after her marriage in 1854. In the 1861 census the Ashtons were with the Henlys in Primrose Hill, described as visitors, so it may be that they did not have a permanent home of their own. Primrose Hill is as near as I can get Mrs Ashton to Brixton, but it is under ten miles away.

The Ashtons had three children in total, but one, John Arthur, had died in 1860, aged just under four. George Henry was born in 1861, but it can't be him in the next photo. If I have the correct Mrs Ashton then the child in the photo would be Mary Jane, who was about three in, say, 1862. I think it is a girl on this occasion, even though the Victorians would insist on dressing their small boys in frocks.

Mrs Ashton and child
Mrs Ashton and child
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

John Peter Ashton died in 1869; Mary Ann didn't remarry and died in Southport in 1913, although her home was in South Norwood.

William Fraser Cass Britton (Paddington/Hyde Park)

William Fraser Cass Britton
William Fraser Cass Britton
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Mr Britton lived for many years at 51 Cambridge Street, Hyde Park. He was born c.1833 Great Bardfield, Essex and worked as a civil servant (Customs) in London; he was also an officer in the militia (latterly a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Bedfordshire Regiment). He died, unmarried, on 7 January 1918.

Mr and Mrs Arthur Dear (Bethnal Green)

Arthur and Fanny Dear
Arthur and Fanny Dear
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The address was 11 Bonner Road, Victoria Road, London, according to the wrapper, so it took a long time to find the subjects because in the 1861 census the address was given as 11 Bonner's Road, Bethnal Green. Additionally, the catalogue said their name was Wear. No matter. I love this photo, since it's the only one we have showing a married couple together: they look a little down-at-heel and glum. Out of place really. Arthur could have come straight out of Dickens. They'd probably never been in a photo before.

Arthur was originally a silk manufacturer and quite possibly had his own business, but the London silk trade had been in decline for some time and by 1861 he was foreman in a silk manufactory. He was born in Stepney in January 1800 and had children by his first wife, Mary Ann Spargo, who died in 1849. In 1851 he was living in Spitalfields, which was then the heart of the London silk industry. In 1853 he married Fanny Clements from Findon, Sussex, who was nearly 30 years his junior. Arthur died in the first quarter of 1864, so we can date the photo as about 1862/3. In 1869 Fanny found herself a new husband, roughly her own age - he was baker William Charles Sibley. The couple remained in the East End of London. Fanny died in 1909.

As to their reason for being in Epsom, I have no idea, but there were people connected with silk in town. Ambrose Moore, sometime of Downside, was a silk manufacturer (and the Moores were probably around just at that sort of time, since Cuthbert took a Memento Mori photo of Miss Edith Moore, who died on 12 September 1862). Also, Thomas Brockwell of Church Street was a London silk broker and, curiously, we have a wrapper for him but no glass negative, it appears, so he must have been in Cuthbert's studio at some point.

The Lawford Family (South London)

I think that these photos probably show the children of George Lawford, stockbroker, and his wife Frances Elizabeth. Frances was a sister of Charles Bischoff. The negatives of the children were in a wrapper labelled 'Lawford's children'.

Possibly Mary Evelyn Lawford
Possibly Mary Evelyn Lawford
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Possibly Katharine Frances Lawford
Possibly Katharine Frances Lawford
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Possibly Isabel Margaret Lawford
Possibly Isabel Margaret Lawford
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The Leith Family (Paddington)

The fact that one of the Leith daughters was photographed with one of the daughters of Henry Willis Senior of Epsom suggests that the two families knew each other, but I can find no real connection. John Farley Leith (born c.1808 Aberdeenshire) was a barrister and had spent many years in Calcutta before returning to the UK. He was also the sometime MP for Aberdeen. He had several children and the one in this photo would be either Helen (born c.1838) or Emily (c.1843), neither of whom married.

Miss Leith, either Helen or Emily
Miss Leith, either Helen or Emily
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

I will also show you one of a Miss Leith with one of the Willis girls (I am not sure which Willis girl it is and I cannot decide if this is the same Miss Leith as the previous one).

Miss Leith and Miss Willis
Miss Leith and Miss Willis
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Miss Middleton (Tottenham)

Miss Middleton
Miss Middleton
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

I think that this lady might also have been an acquaintance of Mrs Hislop of Epsom High Street, since they were both in the same line of business. So my punt here is Miss Jane Middleton, who had a Fancy Repository in Tottenham High Road and by 1861 she was calling it a Berlin Repository, Berlin wool embroidery being all the rage at that time. She was certainly fancy, wasn't she, looking at the dress, although it doesn't suit her. She was born in Bermondsey, somewhere around 1812, but that's all I know about her. If you can help with further information, please contact the webmaster.

Miss Augusta Waetzig (mostly London)

Miss Augusta Waetzig
Miss Augusta Waetzig
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

What an intriguing character Miss Waetzig is. I know virtually nothing about her but a great deal about her family. She was a governess by occupation and I have no idea what she was doing in Epsom; perhaps she actually lived/worked there in between censuses or maybe she was visiting someone. In any event, she was born in Windsor, which is significant, in about 1829. The wrapper to this negative said 'Miss Waetzig, Northampton', but I can't see how that would be a sufficient address to send a print, so I don't know what the Northampton is all about.

Her father, Johann Gottlob Waetzig, came from Dresden and was naturalised in 1850, although he had come to England in 1815, then living at Surbiton Hill. Mrs Waetzig was Johanna Christiana, also from Dresden. I said that Windsor was significant and that was because Mr Waetzig was in royal service. Let the Windsor and Eton Express of 11 October 1851 tell you the tale in a nutshell.
'GRATIFYING TESTIMONIAL. - A handsome silver snuffbox, bearing the following inscription, has just been presented to Mr Waetzig, for many years master of the band belonging to the 2nd Regiment of Life Guards: - "Presented to J G Waetzig Esq by the band of H M 2nd Regiment of Life Guards, as a token of admiration for his musical talents, esteem for his uniform urbanity and kindness, and regret for his retirement, 1851." Mr Waetzig joined the private band of his late Majesty King George the Fourth (then Prince Regent) in 1815 and continued in His Majesty's service, and afterwards in the private band of Queen Adelaide, until the dissolution of the latter at the death of His Majesty King William the Fourth. Mr Waetzig then took the post of bandmaster in the 2nd Life Guards, which he held for 12 years, and is now living in honourable retirement at Kingston.'
As you might expect when the Prince Regent enters the plot, Augusta's three brothers were born in Brighton. Two of them were very musical, one, John Gustavus, being Sergeant Trumpeter to Queen Victoria, and the other was a cook in the royal kitchens. Instrumentally speaking, Johann and John were hot stuff on the bassoon. Augusta never married and died in Brockley on 7 November 1903, aged 74. She is interred in West Norwood Cemetery.

Miss Emily Ann Wilson (Westminster)

Miss Emily Ann Wilson
Miss Emily Ann Wilson
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Emily Wilson's address is given on the wrapper as Sessions House, which requires some explanation. It was in Little George Street and was part of the complex around Westminster Abbey and the Houses of Parliament, where the Westminster magistrates held court. The Middlesex Guildhall, home of the Supreme Court, now stands roughly on the site.

Emily's father, William Russell Wilson, born 1787 Westminster, was the housekeeper at this establishment, assisted by his wife Ann (née Wheeler) whom he had married in Road, Somerset in 1814: this was where Ann came from and, no, I don't know how they met. Their three daughters were Ann Langdale (1815), Charlotte Grace (1817) and Emily Ann (1821). Ann Langdale is in a sense the interesting one, as she married George Baker Keeling, designer and joint chief engineer for the original Severn Railway Bridge. Readers may know that we had a whole heap of Keelings in Epsom back in Victorian times and I have laboured long to try to link them up with GBK, but haven't managed it yet. However, amongst the little batch of Keeling negatives in the Cuthbert Hopkins collection we have three pictures of a Mr Keeling who is neither Henry nor William Edward, the chemists. Two of them are of the same man, and the man who is different is marked 'Mr G Keeling, Epsom', and I assume him to be George Ratcliffe Keeling Senior. The man who is in two pictures is simply described as Mr Keeling, so I am wondering if he was GBK on a visit and that was why Emily Wilson was in the studio. This man looks a little bit too old to be a son of old Enoch Keeling. I just don't know, but if anyone out there has a photo of George Baker Keeling please compare it with this one and let us know.

Mr Keeling
Mr Keeling
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Back to the Sessions House. Mr and Mrs Wilson died soon after the 1851 census, so Charlotte then took over the reins, assisted by Emily. They had also acquired a live-in relative, their widowed uncle William Merrryweather, who looked useful, because he was a clerk, but possibly not so useful by 1871, when he was described as deaf. Charlotte Grace died in 1875, aged 58, and Emily Ann followed in 1878 (56). Ann Langdale Keeling, who lived in Lydney, Gloucestershire, outlived all of the Wilsons, hanging on until 1892.


PART 2 - Sitters whose abode and identities are unknown


These sitters may or may not have been local, but we don't know exactly who they are. If you know, please contact the webmaster.

Alex.

Photograph of Alex.
Photograph of Alex.
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

We have no idea who this is. The surname was thought to be Morris, but it looks to be a longer word than that. However, there are no ascenders or descenders in the surname. All we can say with any confidence is that the forename is written as 'Alex.' which suggests his name was Alexander. Additionally, as he is a photograph rather than a live sitter, there are strong odds that he had died before Cuthbert Hopkins photographed the photograph, so he was most probably related to someone in Epsom and that person took the picture in to the studio. Apart from that, we have no clues whatsoever.

Miss Cadywold

Miss Cadywold
Miss Cadywold
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

This lady's photo is catalogued in amongst the family of John Armstrong, the Epsom racehorse trainer, the implication being that she was in the studio with them. However, it isn't wise to make such an assumption because of the age of the glass negatives and wrappers (150 years plus in most cases) and the number of hands that the material has passed through. As with many of the wrappers, the handwriting is bad and the proposition was that this person was named Ladywold. However, having seen all the wrappers available, I think the 'L' is a 'C'. The name Ladywold barely exists at all, but Cadywold does and at the period in question it was almost exclusive to Norfolk. I am not aware that the Armstrongs ever lived in Norfolk, but they were in Newmarket for some time, which is not that far away. I think the Cadywolds may have been farmers but can't get any further.

'Mr Eger' of Ripley

'Mr Eger' of Ripley
'Mr Eger' of Ripley
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

I'm happy about the Mr and the Ripley but not the Eger. Although the surname of Eger does exist, it is not at all common and I can't find one in Ripley. However, some of the names on wrappers are mis-spelled, so I am wondering if he is John King Eager, surgeon, who lived in Ripley village. Mr Eager would have been about 50 at the relevant time.

'Miss Haworth' of Leatherhead

'Miss Haworth' of Leatherhead
'Miss Haworth' of Leatherhead
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

I have no idea about this one. The writing on the wrapper is so bad that it could equally be Howard or Howarth.

Miss Hookway, Alexander's

Miss Hookway
Miss Hookway
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The reference to Alexander's probably means the household of Nathaniel Alexander of Dorking Road, but Miss Hookway doesn't appear there in any census. However, in the 1861 census there was a Miss Maria Hookway from Devon visiting Mrs Elizabeth Yeo, who was also from Devon and the wife of William Yeo, footman to the Brooks family at Woodcote House. My theory is that Miss Hookway was a servant whom Mrs Yeo knew from Devon and that she got a job at Alexander's in the early 1860s.

'Miss Jarvis' (doubtful)

The wrapper has been catalogued as Jarvis, but I don't think this is correct, especially as I can't find anyone to fit the bill. I also think that we have two photos of this lady, even though the webmaster is unconvinced that they are the same person, so I shall show you both of them.

'Miss Jarvis'?
'Miss Jarvis'?
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

'Miss Jarvis'?
'Miss Jarvis'?
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The writing on the one wrapper we have is abysmal and the name doesn't look like Jarvis to me: it could say 'Mrs Harsant', who was the wife of William Harsant, the Epsom High Street chemist, which would make some sort of sense, as we have another photo of one of the Harsant daughters with a lady who is probably her schoolteacher. The Harsant girl would not have been a boarder at school, so it might be that Mrs H went along to the same session as her daughter.

'Mr Potts' (doubtful)

Allegedly Mr Potts
Allegedly Mr Potts
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The proposition is that this old gentleman goes with Mrs Potts of Cheam, who is discussed in Part 1 of this article. I don't think he is Mr Potts, who was not as old as this gentleman looks. Nor can it be Mr Potts' father, since he died in 1851. It's possible that the negative somehow came adrift from its wrapper and that it's someone for whom we have a wrapper but apparently no negative.

Elizabeth Wheeler

Elizabeth Wheeler
Elizabeth Wheeler
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

I am satisfied that the name on the wrapper is Elizabeth Wheeler, but have no idea who she was. The numbering of the wrapper places her with a number of photos of Charles Bischoff, suggesting that she had some connection with his household

Mr Wheeler, The College.

Mr Wheeler, The College
Mr Wheeler, The College
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

The wrapper has a word in between 'Mr' and 'Wheeler', but I can't make it out. It could be 'Mrs' or a forename. In any event, the only person named Wheeler who can be found with a connection to the college is a pupil, Thomas Wheeler, who became an architect. Other than that, we have no clue as to this man's identity.

Miss Willmot

Miss Willmot
Miss Willmot
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum


The wrapper has what looks like the letter 'H' for the forename initial, which is unfortunate, as I can find someone to fit the bill but not with that initial. The wrapper also had 'Mrs Hankey's niece …' written on it but that has been crossed through. I don't think she is anything to do with Mrs Hankey, but she may well have something to do with Mrs Mary Willmot and her son Philip, the master boot maker, both of whom were living in Epsom at the relevant time. If it were not for the suspect initial 'H' I would think it was Philip's sister, Sarah (Sally) Louise, dressmaker and long-time Epsom resident, who would have been around 27 or so in the early 1860s. The lack of an address of any kind on the wrapper suggests that she was an Epsom resident and known to Cuthbert Hopkins. If they were visitors he generally wrote some kind of address or at least the name of the resident the prints should be sent to. On a cautionary note the Willmot may be spelt wrongly.

Miss Young

Miss Young
Miss Young
Photograph by Cuthbert John Hopkins, courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

There are two possibilities that I can find. She could be Emily, daughter of Ann Young, a grocer in Epsom High Street, or she might be Mary, the younger sister of Caroline Redford Young, who helped run a small school in Woodcote Road. The wrapper does say 'High Street', so she is more likely to be Emily.

Linda Jackson 2019