The Northeys Of Woodcote House - Part 5

Part 5 - Edward Richard Northey (1795-1878)

Edward Richard Northey
Edward Richard Northey
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum

Edward Richard was born in Kinlet on 8 February 1795. He was a newly-commissioned Ensign in the 52nd Regiment Light Infantry when, aged just 17, he set off for the Peninsular War in Spain. He was wounded by a shell at the Battle of Vittoria, an engagement with the French in 1813, and fought in the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. Some time later he exchanged his commission in the 52nd for one in the Scots Fusiliers.

The Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler
The Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Edward inherited Woodcote on the death of his father in 1828. On 29 March 1828, just three weeks before his father died at Brighton, he married Charlotte Isabella Anson at the parish church of St Nicholas.

St Nicholas, Brighton
St Nicholas, Brighton.
Image courtesy of Linda Jackson © 2012

Charlotte was born in about 1810, the daughter of General Sir George Anson (1769-1849), MP for Lichfield from 1806-41, and Frances Hamilton (died 1834). One of her brothers was Major The Hon Octavius Henry St George Anson (1818-59) of the 9th Lancers, who died of disease at Deyrah, Bengal, whilst serving there. Charlotte and Edward had seven children between 1830 and 1841, all christened at St Martin's, Epsom (apart from Harriet Isabella, who was christened at St Marylebone).

Name Date of birth Date of christening Date of death Place of death Place of burial
Harriet Isabella 20.2.1830 13.3.1830 17.10.1922 Sevenoaks  
Edward William 23.4.1832 22.5.1832 21.10.1914   Epsom Cem.
Charlotte Lucy 8.1833 27.8.1833 1.6.1839 Epsom St Martin's
George Wilbraham 28.1.1835 28.2.1835 12.3.1906 Wiltshire Probably Box
Francis Vernon 14.10.1836 16.11.1836 6.4.1879 South Africa Epsom Cem.
Herbert 11.1838 4.2.1839 30.1.1840 Epsom St Martin's
Agnes Constance 1841 11.7.1841 9.5.1921 Somerset  

We will deal with some of the children at the end of this Part and others in subsequent Parts.

On 14 February 1842 Charlotte Isabella arrived at Valetta, Malta, where she had gone for her health; she died there just four days later. Lieutenant-Colonel EGV Northey mentions that the family have Charlotte's diaries, in which she wrote of bad coughing and it is presumed that she died of consumption. She was buried in Malta but is commemorated on the family tomb at St Martin's.

Memorial inscription to Charlotte Isabella
Memorial inscription to Charlotte Isabella.
Image courtesy of Liz Manterfield © 2006

On 20 December 1844 at St Mary, Bryanston Square, London Edward married Louisa Mary Ann Hesketh of Epsom, born 5 December 1812, daughter of the late Reverend Robert Cuthbert Hesketh, Rector of St Dunstan in the East, and his wife Emma. In the 1841 census she and three of her siblings were living together in Church Street, Epsom. Robert and Emma Hesketh are buried in St Martin's. They died on 11 February 1837 and 17 February 1847 respectively.

After leaving the army with the Peninsular medal (with six clasps, each one representing a battle in which he had fought) and the Waterloo medal, Edward was prominent in Epsom, becoming a magistrate and Chairman of the Bench from 1870 until 1877. He was High Sheriff of Surrey in 1856 and Deputy Lieutenant. The return of owners of land in 1873 recorded the size of his Surrey land holdings as 1598 acres, which equated to approximately 2.5 square miles.

Peninsular and Waterloo medals
The Peninsular and Waterloo medals.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Edward died on 21 December 1878 at Woodcote House, after several years of declining health. His obituary in the local paper described him thus: 'Sometimes austere and almost harsh, he was generally just. He was distinguished by his urbanity, and a very kindly disposition often showed itself through his bluff manner'. He was buried in Epsom Cemetery. By the terms of Edward's will, Louisa was allowed to remain at Woodcote for six months only and she moved to another of his properties - Downside, Epsom -, where she resided with four maids, and died there on 30 December 1885; she was interred with her husband.

Portrait of Edward Richard in later life
Portrait of Edward Richard in later life.
Image courtesy of Martin Northey.

Grave of Edward Richard and Louisa Northey
Grave of Edward Richard and Louisa Northey, Epsom Cemetery.
Image courtesy of Liz Manterfield © 2006

Harriet Isabella

Harriet Isabella Northey was born on 20 February 1830 in London and on 20 September 1855 at St Martin-in-the Fields, London she married Captain George Ross of the Royal Engineers; he was the son of Field Marshal Sir Hew Dalrymple Ross GCB (Wellington's Master Gunner) and brother of General Sir John Ross KCB, who served in India and commanded the Imperial Forces in Canada. Another brother, Major Hew Graham Ross of the Royal Artillery, died at Newcastle in 1848, aged 31, after a fall from his horse.

George Ross is something of a mystery. He was born in Ireland in about 1822 and during the 1850s was in the Royal Engineers. In 1861 he was made a supernumerary captain and I cannot find him anywhere again until his death on 13 April 1897 at Barnwood House Gloucester, which was a mental hospital. Harriet turned up in the 1881 and 1891 censuses in Kensington, described as married, but George was not with her. In 1901 she was in Eastbourne with some Anson cousins and in 1911 in Sevenoaks, Kent with some Ansons. She died there on 17 October 1922.

Agnes Constance

Agnes Constance Northey was born in 1841 in Epsom and she had moved to Somerset by 1881, possibly to be near her brother, George. In 1901 she was living in a house called 'Little Woodcote' in Weston. In 1894 she had married George Edward Farthing from Wincanton, who was almost 20 years her junior. By the 1901 census, when she would have been about 60, she had adjusted her age to a mere 56, which was presumably all she could get away with. Surprisingly George predeceased her (probably in 1907) and in 1911 she was living in a 12-roomed abode called ' Downside House' (undoubtedly another nod to Epsom) in Chilcompton, Somerset with a companion named Emily Chopping, a housemaid and a houseboy. She remained in this house until she died on 9 May 1921.

We will now look at the boys, starting with George Wilbraham Northey in Part 6.

Links to the Previous and next parts.

Linda Jackson © February 2012

The Northeys Of Woodcote House
Northey Family
Adam Hogg
Adam Hogg
Hilda Andrews
Hilda Andrews
The Glyns
The Glyns
Gadesdens
Gadesdens
Journey Time
Journey Time
Thomas Tresize
Thomas Tresize
Blake Charles
Blake Charles
Blake Girls
Blake Girls
Barnards of Epsom
Barnards of Epsom