The Northeys Of Woodcote House - Part 4

Part 4 - The Reverend Edward Northey (1754-1828) and family

As William 4 left no heirs, the 'tail male' of the Woodcote inheritance should have gone sideways to his next eldest brother, Edward, but apparently he never owned the property and it passed to the latter's son, Edward Richard. This 'skip' hardly matters, since Edward outlived William 4 by scarcely two years.

The Reverend Edward Northey
The Reverend Edward Northey.
Image courtesy of Martin Northey © 2012.

The Reverend Edward Northey was born on 22 October 1754 and was a working clergyman. He graduated from Corpus Christi, Cambridge in 1777. From 1797 until his death he was a Canon of Windsor and treasurer of the body of Canons. His other appointments as a clergyman (some of them simultaneous) were as shown below.

1779-1800 St John the Baptist, Kinlet and St Mary, Cleobury Mortimer, Shropshire
1800-1811 St Michael, Urchfont, Wiltshire
1802-1821 St Mary, Nether Stowey, Somerset
1807-1817 St Mary, Edlesborough, Buckinghamshire
1820-1822 Ilsley, Berkshire

Kinlet Church
Kinlet Church.
Photograph by Jonathan Billinger © 2012 and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

He married Charlotte Taylor (1771-1837) on 3 March 1794 at Patrixbourne, near Canterbury: she was the daughter of the Reverend Edward Taylor of Byfrons (or Bifrons)5, also near Canterbury, and at long last we are literally on solid Surrey ground, for Charlotte was buried in a large table tomb at the rear of St Martin's in Epsom. Edward died on 18 April 1828 at Brighton and, when you reach the Appendix at the end of this article, you will see that he is conspicuous by his absence in the list of Northey burials at Epsom. This is because (a) he never lived there, and (b) he strongly disapproved of Wicked Billy and said that he did not wish to be buried within ten miles of Epsom. Instead, he was interred in St George's Chapel, Windsor, where there is a memorial tablet to him.

St George's Chapel, Windsor, 1848.
St George's Chapel, Windsor, 1848.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons

The children of Edward and Charlotte were Edward Richard, Charlotte, Harriet, Lucy, Mary and William Brook, all born in Kinlet. Edward Richard is the man we are after, but we will look briefly at the others.

Charlotte Junior was born in 1796 and in 1836 she married Henry Knight (born c.1797) in Pancras, London. They had one daughter, Agnes Charlotte (born 1837). Both parents died soon after Agnes's birth - Charlotte in 1839 and Henry in 1843.

Agnes married Narborough Hughes D'Aeth (1821-86), a gentleman farmer and magistrate of Knowlton, Kent and died in 1927.

Harriet was born in 1797 and died in 1823. Lucy was born in 1798 and died unmarried in London in 1874.

Mary (born 1800) married the Reverend William Knight (1798-1873), brother of Henry above. Both Knights were nephews of Jane Austen and were really surnamed Austen, but, as often happened in those days, an inheritance had induced the family to change its surname. William Knight was Rector of Steventon, Hampshire from 1822 until his death; Jane Austen was born in the Rectory and her father and two of her brothers were also Rectors of Steventon.

Steventon Rectory
Steventon Rectory.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Mary married William in 1840 and was his second wife: they had three daughters, who tragically died of scarlet fever during the same week in June 1848 - two of them on the same day. They are commemorated on this poignant memorial in All Saints Church.

Memorial in All Saints Church, Steventon
Memorial in All Saints Church, Steventon
Photograph by Ian Yarham and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

William Brook Northey

William Brook Northey was born in 1805 and married in 1829 Agnes Boreel (c.1808-70), daughter of a Dutch Army General. In 1822 he became an Ensign and Lieutenant by purchase in the Coldstream Guards. He rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel and was a Deputy Lieutenant of Kent, dying on 10 July 1880 in St John's Wood, North London. The children of William Brook and Agnes were William Brook Junior (1835-1855, Lieutenant in the 71st Highland Light Infantry, died of disease at Yenikale in the Crimea), Alfred Edward, Agnes Mary (c.1844-1912, unmarried), and Sarah Emily (c.1846-1922, unmarried)

Alfred Edward (1838-24 January 1911) was a clergyman; he married Harriet Alice Hatton (known as Alice) in 1880 at Hockerill, Hertfordshire, where he was Principal of the Training College. He later became Vicar of Rickmansworth and Chaplain at Tangier (1901-2) and died on 24 January 1911 in Torquay. One of his and Alice's sons, also William Brook (c.1884-?), was a Major in the Ghurkha Rifles and was awarded the Military Cross; he wrote several books about the Ghurkhas and Nepal.

Another son of Alfred Edward's, Lieutenant Alfred Northey, a regular officer of the Royal Worcestershire Regiment, was killed in action in France on 12 October 1914, aged 28, and was buried at Brown's Road Military Cemetery, Festubert.

Lt Alfred Northey
Lt Alfred Northey

In Part 5 we shall look at Edward Richard Northey and some of his family.

Links to the Previous and next parts.

Linda Jackson © February 2012
Footnotes

5. The author Jane Austen had a crush on Reverend Taylor's son, Edward, who had, she said 'such beautiful dark eyes'. Later she wrote 'We went by Bifrons and I contemplated with a melancholy pleasure the abode of Him, on whom I once fondly doted'. One of Charlotte's sisters, Mary Elizabeth, married Edward Bootle-Wilbraham, 1st Baron Skelmersdale, and this is very likely why the name 'Wilbraham' subsequently cropped up in the Northey family. Similarly, the name 'Brook', which was given to some Northeys, also occurred in the Taylor family - see Wikipedia.org.

The Northeys Of Woodcote House
Northey Family
Adam Hogg
Adam Hogg
Hilda Andrews
Hilda Andrews
The Glyns
The Glyns
Gadesdens
Gadesdens
Journey Time
Journey Time
Thomas Tresize
Thomas Tresize
Blake Charles
Blake Charles
Blake Girls
Blake Girls
Barnards of Epsom
Barnards of Epsom