EAST STREET, EPSOM

Introduction

East Street
East Street
Image courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum.

There is not much left of the East Street business premises as they were in 1911 but, to be fair, most of them were fairly undistinguished. The two blocks immediately next to the East Street railway bridge are still fairly intact (almost wholly intact on the south side), so those are what we will show you in this section. It is probably more interesting to look at a building which bears some resemblance to the 1911 version and discover who/what was there a century ago than to stare at a modern building which gives you no historical connection at all.

However, although East Street was always something of a hotch-potch, with the gasworks and waterworks and a lot of residential accommodation running off the main street - for example, Clayton Road - there were some interesting things which do not feature on our interactive map but are worthy of mention.

Apart from Numbers 19-25 and what was The Plough and Harrow (27), the only other Grade II listed buildings in East Street proper are Numbers 42-44 (plus there is Flint Cottage in Clayton Road). Numbers 42-44 are former cottages that are now offices and sit marooned as the filling in a sandwich of modern brick.

19-25 East Street
19-25 East Street

The Plough and Harrow
The Plough and Harrow
Images courtesy of Bourne Hall Museum.

The King's Arms public house (formerly 118, now number 144) is still standing and has recently had an attractive refurbishment to the frontage.

Part of the strange geography of East Street and environs used to be Garden Cottages, a row of 21 dwellings running south to north, just west of the gasworks. Two chimney sweeps (with assistants) lived there and another was at 33 East Street. You may not find that untoward, but the 1911 census produces only around a dozen sweeps in Epsom and five of those were inmates of Long Grove Asylum.

Another resident of this hotch-potch road was Mr William Skinner, a dairyman who kept poultry at Number 97; his brother-in-law, George Holbrow, ran the dairy at 74 which had previously been operated by Mr Skinner. Both of them had been dairy farmers in Sutton and I imagine that this was a joint enterprise.

William Skinner
William Skinner
Image courtesy of Sue Wakelin ©2013.

At 49-53 the Morse family had their nurseries and shop. The 1911 patriarch, William Wallace Morse, had been a stationer and tobacconist in East Street. In 1891 his father, Edward, then aged 72, was still running the nursery, but he died in 1898. William's older brother, Edward was also in the business. Before the Morses took over, the nursery had been run by Joseph Ransley Tanton, who was responsible for the landscaping of Epsom Cemetery and died in 1878; his widow, Florence, continued to run a flower and seed business for some years at Childerplat, 39 East Street.

Now go to the interactive map of the street which can be found by clicking on this thumbnail:
Hovering your mouse over a property will reveal its address; if the property is coloured red, it is a business and a left click of your mouse will bring up the details. Alternatively, use the street list at the end by clicking on the links.

HV Usill
HV Usill
Jimmy Page
Jimmy Page
Page Family
Page Family
TH Snow
TH Snow
JA Larby
JA Larby
J Harrison
J Harrison
Foundlings
Foundlings
Nonsuch Mansion
Nonsuch Mansion
New Stables
New Stables