The De Teissiers Of Woodcote Park


Part 3 - The 2nd To 6th Barons


James Fitzpatrick, 2nd Baron

James Fitzpatrick de Teissier succeeded to the barony on the death of his father in 1868 and kept the house at 7 Brunswick Terrace, Hove, although in 1871 he was living at 17 Vernon Terrace, Brighton. He was a career army officer, who served in the Afghan Wars from 1838-42, rising to the rank of Lieutenant- Colonel before he retired on half-pay. He then rejoined as a Staff Captain at the Invalid Depot, Chatham before retiring on half-pay again in 1864. In 1869, at the age of 52, he married Horatia Caroline Westby in the Parish Church of St Marylebone, London.

Vernon Terrace, Brighton
Vernon Terrace, Brighton.
Photograph by Hassocks5489. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Horatia was born in about 1829 in London. Her parents were Nicholas Westby of Thornhill, County Dublin and the Hon Emily Susanna Laura Waldegrave, daughter of Admiral William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock.

Admiral William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock.
Admiral William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons

By 1881 James and Horatia had moved back to 7 Brunswick Terrace, where he died of paralysis and dropsy (accumulation of fluid in the body) on 17 August 1884; he was buried in the churchyard of St Andrew's, Hove. Horatia died in 1900. As James died childless, the barony passed to his brother, Philip.

Philip Antoine, 3rd Baron

Philip was educated at Corpus Christi, Oxford and entered holy orders. He had a number of curacies and in 1871 was the vicar of Warfield, Berkshire; he wrote five religious books. He was also sometime Consul-General of Denmark and was involved in the Royal Literary Fund.

In 1872 he bought Bourne House in East Woodhay, Hampshire (near Newbury) and lived there more or less until he died at the Westminster Palace Hotel, London, on 24 April 1891. As he was unmarried and childless, the barony passed to his brother Henry.

Bourne House, East Woodhay
Bourne House, East Woodhay.
Photograph by R.W. de Salis. Image source: Wikipedia

Henry Price, 4th Baron

Henry was 70 when he succeeded to the barony and he did not hold it for long, dying on 27 May 1895. He was a career soldier who spent much of his life in India, retiring in 1882 with the rank of Lieutenant-General. In his later years he lived at Fetcham Grove, Leatherhead.

On 17 January 1855 he married Mary Shirley Miller at Fort William, Calcutta, which was then the main British Army headquarters in India (and it is still in use by the Indian Army today). Mary was born in about 1818 and died in 1883.

Fort William, Calcutta c.1828.
Fort William, Calcutta c.1828.
Image source: Wikimedia Commons

There were four children of the marriage, all born in India, who were Henrietta Shirley (1857), Mary Tragett (1859), Rose Price (1861) and Henry (1862).

Neither Henrietta nor Mary married and they lived together on their return from India. In 1901 they were in Hove and had moved to Chelsea by 1911. Mary died in 1927 and Henrietta in 1943.

In 1891 Rose married Colonel Arthur Robert Austen CMG (born on 17 June 1860 in Havant, Hampshire), who was a nephew of the author Jane Austen. He had served in the Anglo-Egyptian War in the early 1880s and with the Camel Corps. From 1914-20 he was re-employed as a Colonel of Records. Rose and Arthur had three sons, all born in Herefordshire, who were Hugh Ernest Victor (1891), Francis Herbert (1893) and Arthur Neville (1896). The couple later lived at The Red House, Rowlands Castle, Hampshire (near Havant).

Hugh was an engineer, who was awarded the MBE; he died in 1978. Francis was awarded the OBE and died in 1971. Arthur Neville was killed in action on the Somme in March 1918, whilst an acting Major commanding a battery; he was awarded the Military Cross posthumously and buried at Doullens Communal Cemetery in the Somme region.

Arthur Robert died in 1939, but I have not yet found a death record for Rose.

Henry, 5th Baron

Henry was born in Rawalpindi (now in Pakistan) and succeeded to the Barony in 1895. He was at some point a Captain in the 8th Hussars. In 1887, at Crosthwaite, Cumberland, he married Agneta Mary Ballantine-Dykes, whose father, Frecheville, was High Sheriff of Cumberland and MP for Cockermouth.

In 1905 there was a problem with the Barony - it seems as if the original paperwork from the Prince Regent's time could not be found - and it required King Edward VII to confirm that this French title could continue to descend down the line, but only as far as a grandson of Henry. (As a point of interest, as of 2007 only six foreign titles that had been conferred on British nationals remained in existence and there were never more than about 30 in the first place.)

Henry and Agneta had two sons, who were Geoffrey Fitzherbert (born on 5 December 1888) and Aubrey (1893). Aubrey was in the Royal Flying Corps during World War I and was killed in a flying accident at Hornchurch, Essex, where there was an airfield at the time.

Henry died in 1931, at which time he was living in Upper Norwood, London, and Agneta died in 1956 in Aldershot district. The barony then passed to Geoffrey.

Geoffrey Fitzherbert, 6th Baron

Geoffrey was another career soldier and served as a Captain in the Scots Guards. In 1916 he married Katharine Henriette Seligman, who was from one of the premier Jewish families in New York. I cannot find any record that they lived in the UK for very long. They did have a home in Antibes, in the South of France, and by 1948 they were living in Siesta Key, Sarasota, Florida. They were still in Sarasota when Geoffrey died in 1977. Katharine apparently died in 1980. Their son, Ivor Geoffrey Dykes, was born in 1917 in Cambridgeshire and is still alive, aged 94; he did not take up the title and it ended with him in any event, so there will be no more British Barons de Teissier.

Postscript

Attentive readers will notice that I have bypassed the two younger sons of James, the 1st Baron, the reason being that they did not fit in with the flow of the Barons. I shall deal with them now.

George Frederick (1821) followed the same route as his brother Philip, graduating from Corpus Christi, Oxford and entering the church. He was at one time rector of Church Brampton in Northamptonshire and later vicar of St Mary's, Childrey, Berkshire, where there is a brass tablet in his memory.

Plaque in St Mary's, Childrey
Plaque in St Mary's, Childrey
Photograph by © Brian Robert Marshall and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Geoffrey went to live at Hill House, Midhurst, Sussex and then apparently moved to West Street, Chichester, where he died on 8 April 1890. He does not seem to have married.

There is very little information about Lewis Minet (1823). All I know about him is that he was in the Army in Bengal as a young man. His last address was Brooke House in Upper Clapton, London (effectively Hackney) and he died in that district on 3 November 1908, leaving effects of £7062. Letters of Administration were granted to his brother, Henry. Brooke House was originally Hackney Palace but had been converted into a lunatic asylum as far back as 1758 and remained so until the patients were evacuated in 1940: it was then badly damaged by enemy action and never re-opened. It was eventually demolished and replaced by a school which Lord Alan Sugar attended as a lad.

Linda Jackson - © December 2011



Links to Part 1 and Part 2


Adam Hogg
Adam Hogg
Hilda Andrews
Hilda Andrews
The Glyns
The Glyns
Gadesdens
Gadesdens
Journey Time
Journey Time
Thomas Tresize
Thomas Tresize
Blake Charles
Blake Charles
Blake Girls
Blake Girls
Barnards of Epsom
Barnards of Epsom
EW Martin
EW Martin