The Andrews Family


Part 4 - The Andrews Sisters

Emily, Elizabeth And Lucy


As we have seen from the previous articles in this series, male heirs were very thin on the ground in the Epsom Andrews family, since most of the men did not marry at all and, of the two who did, only William Chase Morrish Andrews produced any children. James, the sole remaining male Andrews, then let the side down by remaining a bachelor all his life.

However, the daughters of W C M Andrews who did marry were a different story, producing many children.


Emily Andrews

Emily, born in about 1837, married Samuel Alfred Varley, a telegraph/electrical engineer; they initially lived in Islington and then Hatfield, Hertfordshire, but they separated between 1881 and 1891. In the 1891-1911 censuses Samuel was living in lodgings in Hornsey, London. In 1891 Emily and most of the children were with her son, Cornelius Percy, and she was still with him in 1911, living in Hampstead, London. Emily died in 1912 in Hampstead and Samuel on 4 August 1921 at his home, Abbotsacre Lodge, in Winchester, Hampshire, aged 89.

Their children were Emily Lucy (1862-1932, unmarried), Cornelius Percy (1863-1934, married Violet Bloom), Maud Marian Bridgett (1864-1949, married Ernest Chapman), Telford (20 March 1866-7 May 1938, married Anne Parsons, daughter of the town clerk of Mansfield, Nottinghamshire), Fleetwood Ireton (1868-1941, married Harriet Elizabeth Heenan)1, Elsie Dorling (1875-1951, unmarried) and Edith Irene (1876 - ?).

The Reverend Telford Varley was a Cambridge mathematics graduate and schoolmaster who was subsequently ordained; he was headmaster of Peter Symonds College, Winchester from 1897 to 1926, after which he retired to Brighton, where he died in 1938. On three occasions he won the Seatonian Prize, which is awarded annually by Cambridge University for the best poem on a sacred subject, with verses entitled 'Job', 'Saint Peter' and 'Jerusalem'2. He also wrote books about Winchester and Hampshire.

The Reverend Telford Varley
The Reverend Telford Varley
Image courtesy of Peter Symonds College

The Peter Symonds College describes him thus:-
'1897
Peter Symonds' School opened in May, 1897, at 39, Southgate Street.

Only six headmasters have been appointed in 102 years and the first two of these, Telford Varley and Dr Freeman covered the first half-century between them. The ethos of the school has been greatly influenced by the personalities and achievements of these men.

Appointed in 1897 and ordained a priest in 1908, the Revd Telford Varley was a formidable first headmaster for the school. He was held greatly in awe by the boys; this was partly because of his manner; distant eyed behind his beard, he was capable of fearsome outbursts of temper and of designing strange punishments, making offenders feel very small indeed. He caught a boy climbing through a classroom window and invited him to climb in and out of it 50 times after school while Varley himself sat in the room marking.

Slovenly pupils who slouched around with their hands in their pockets were paraded in Northbrook Hall at 4 o'clock and invited by Mr. Varley to "assume an attitude of hobbledehoy". They then shambled round the hall with hangdog expression until told to assume "the attitude of a gentleman", when they straightened themselves and marched smartly round and round.

During the pauses in this exercise, trains could he heard entering and leaving Winchester station, and, as many of the delinquents were train boys, this added to their discomfiture. "This is called the old game of keeping the headmaster in," he gloated. "That was the 4 o'clock to Eastleigh. There will be another at 5 o'clock..." His inspection report would meet with approval nowadays, his discipline methods less so!

1898
The first annual examination and inspection in 1898 stated: "Here you have proof of three things: 1st, the energy and organising skill of the Headmaster; 2nd, the loyal co-operation of the staff; 3rd, the hearty obedience of the boys." On December 21st, 1899, they moved to the present site off Cranworth Road. There were 87 boys on the register and the headmaster's salary was £100 per annum, plus £4 for each boy.

1926
He retired in 1926 and was succeeded by Dr Freeman, a mathematics graduate, always known as "Doc".'3
Here I must digress into the wider Varley family, because Samuel Alfred was not just any electrical engineer. He laid the first field telegraph in the Crimean War and was the brother of Cromwell Fleetwood Varley FRS, who was particularly associated with the development of the electric telegraph and the transatlantic telephone cable. The family originally belonged to the Sandemanians, a Christian religious sect which had very few adherents in the UK, and a fellow member of their congregation was the daddy of all 'electricians', Michael Faraday. Cromwell was a member of the Paranormal Society and apparently the family believed themselves to be descendants of both Oliver Cromwell and General Charles Fleetwood (Cromwell's son-in-law) - and they very probably were, but life is too short for me to study Oliver Cromwell's family tree. Samuel presumably subscribed to this belief in naming his youngest son Fleetwood Ireton, since Cromwellian General Charles Fleetwood married one of Cromwellian General Henry Ireton's daughters.

It seems that Cromwell Fleetwood and Samuel Alfred had a bitter falling-out out at some stage, with Samuel believing that Cromwell had taken the credit for his (Samuel's) inventions.

It has been said that Samuel did not receive the rewards that he deserved through lack of business acumen, in that he let important patents for his inventions lapse before they became commercially valuable.

Other Varleys were well-respected painters - see, for example, Samuel Alfred's father, Cornelius, at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornelius_Varley and his uncle, John Varley, at www.chrisbeetles.com.

I cannot leave the Varley family without mentioning the wife of Samuel's brother, Cromwell Fleetwood (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._F._Varley ). Her name was Ellen and, while Cromwell was away on a cable-laying expedition, she ran off with a Greek-American playboy called Ion Perdicaris and she and Cromwell were subsequently divorced. Ellen and Perdicaris settled in Tangier, with her son, Cromwell Oliver. In 1904 Perdicaris and Cromwell Oliver were kidnapped by bandits. This provoked an international incident, US President Theodore Roosevelt dispatched warships and Marines and generally the whole episode turned into an international fiasco. A ransom was eventually paid, the hostages were released unharmed and the family went to live in Tunbridge Wells. I am aware that this sounds preposterous, but it did happen and was the basis for the Sean Connery film, 'The Wind and the Lion'. The full story can be read at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ion_Perdicaris.

A contemporary cartoon concerning the Perdicaris incident.
A contemporary cartoon concerning the Perdicaris incident.
Image source: Wikipedia Commons


Elizabeth Andrews

Elizabeth, born in 1848, was a teacher and governess and in the 1860s she taught for several years in Neudictendorf,4 near Gotha in Germany. She returned to Epsom around 1870 and was back with her mother in the 1881 census.

On 12 March 1883 at Christ Church, Highbury, London she married widower James Jeffery, who lived at The Parade, Epsom. James was born either in the Devizes, Wiltshire area or in Bath - he couldn't seem to make up his mind in the censuses. James's first wife, Sarah, had died in 1882 and their children, to four of whom Elizabeth became stepmother, were Bertha (about 1868-1872), Edgar Edwin (1871-1951, married Winifred F Giles), Edith Ethel (1870-72), Harold Anchor (born 1873), Ernest Thomas (1875-1951, married Evelyn Louise Stredwick) and Evan Rowton (1877 -?).

James and Elizabeth went on to have children of their own, but I will deal with Harold Anchor Jeffrey first because there is an interesting story about him. It has a beginning and an end, but, unfortunately, the middle is something of a mystery.

Harold and his brother, Evan, both joined the 1st Royal Dragoon Guards (possibly together - Harold joined in 1896) and eventually went off to fight in the Second Boer War (1899-1902). They were both present at the relief of Ladysmith, Harold being a Sergeant and Evan a Private. Evan transferred to the South African Constabulary, but he did return to the UK in due course and was back at home in Epsom in the 1911 census, his occupation being stated as a bank clerk for Brown, Shipley & Co who were, and still are, international merchant bankers.

After his army service ended in 1908 it seems that Harold did not return, at least not permanently. He next appeared at a place called Helena Valley, near Perth, Western Australia5 on 26 September 1914, aged 41 years 5 months, enlisting in the Australian Army. His existing occupation was given as bushman (at this time a bushman was someone who lived an outdoor life, working and sleeping in the open air). He gave his next of kin as a Lilian Mulgrue of Geraldton6 and claimed that she was his sister, although she was not. She was Mrs Lilian Mulgrue (nee Dow), originally from Poona, India, who was married to James Arthur Mulgrue, with a three year old son. At the time she was staying with a relative and I would imagine that she was just a friend of Harold. Sadly, Harold did not last much longer and was killed in action at Gallipoli on 7 August 1915. He has no known grave. As a postscript, his estate amounted to just £9.60 and the newspaper notice at the time said that he was otherwise known as John Hinton of Northampton (another place near Perth). There is obviously a further story yet to be discovered about Harold.

But we must return to Epsom!

James Jeffery was a schoolmaster and had been a pupil teacher as early as 1851 when, at the age of 15, he was visiting his widowed mother, Jane, in Chelsea. She was housekeeper at 'The Literary Institute' there7. In 1861 he was an assistant master at the Royal Medical Benevolent College (later Epsom College). His son, Edgar Edwin, attended Epsom College and his entry in the college records describes James as 'schoolmaster of Epsom (by whom backward boys were coached)'. In 1868 he started a boarding house in Epsom which took boys who were having difficulties coping at the college and this enterprise was effectively a preparatory school, which he ran until about 1900.

The headmaster and masters of Epsom College.
The headmaster and masters of Epsom College.
This photograph was taken between 1855 and 1870 and James Jeffery is in it.
He is probably the second man on the left.

This 1895 advertisement for the 'Epsom College preparatory School' suggests that Elizabeth was taking an active part and it can be seen that at least some of her teaching experience in Germany took place in the Moravian School at Gnadau8 in North Germany. This is interesting in itself, as Gnadau originally came into being as a settlement of the Moravian Church (also known as the Bohemian Brethren), which was in effect a worldwide Protestant missionary movement that had its origins centuries earlier in a breakaway from Roman Catholic practices.

Advert for Epsom College Preparatory School
Advert for Epsom College Preparatory School

In the 1901 census, aged 66, James described himself as a journalist and author. He died in 1907.

The children of James and Elizabeth were Oswald Chase Gordon (1885-1955), Edred Fleetwood (1886 - 1953, married Grace Friston)9, Marian Lucy (10 November 1887-1970, unmarried), Kathleen Mary (1889 - 1975?), Maud Jane (1890 - ?).

Elizabeth Andrews/Jeffery was still living at The Parade in 1911 but later moved to Wimbledon. She died on 20 August 1924.


LUCY ANDREWS

Lucy married stonemason and marble merchant, William John Gilliam (born about 1842 Kennington, London) on 12 July 1877 at St Martin's, Epsom. They lived in Croydon and had three children, who were Beatrice Martha (1880 - ?), Ernest William Burchell (1881 - 1935, married (1) Beatrice Bishop and (2) Kathrine Mills) and Arthur Stampa (1883-1967, married (1) Annie Branson and (2) Constance E Smith).

Ernest William was a silversmith and jeweller by trade and Arthur Stampa was a monumental mason (a sculptor in marble, stone and granite, as one census described him). Ernest's elder son, Laurence Duval Gilliam (4 March 1907-15 November 64) was the very respected Director of Features for BBC Radio during the Second World War, for which he received the OBE. According to the BBC, his energy, enthusiasm and drive earned him the nickname of 'Lorenzo the Magnificent'. Elsewhere he has been described as 'brilliant but erratic'.

Linda Jackson © November 2011


Link to previous part.


Footnotes

1. Fleetwood Ireton's daughter is Dame Joan Fleetwood Varley, who was formerly the director of the local government department at Conservative Party Central Office.

2. The subject-matter for the competition, which is still set annually by Cambridge University, seems to have become harder since Telford's day. In 2011 it was 'Shall these bones live?' and in 2010 it was 'Thou hast made him a little lower than the angels'.

3. Quoted by kind permission of Peter Symonds College

4. I cannot find this place on a current map but the spelling may be incorrect or have changed.

5. Helena Valley is now a suburb of Perth. It was in one of the 'boom' areas of Western Australia where gold had been discovered, and the 1890s and early 1900s saw a huge amount of construction, especially of railways. At the outset workers lived in tents and gradually towns were built. It seems likely that Harold Jeffery saw this boom as an opportunity to build a new life after the army. However, with the outbreak of World War 1, the boom went bust and this may well be why he joined up again.

6. a seaport 263 miles north of Perth

7. In 1881 she was living with James and Elizabeth in Epsom and died there in 1882

8. Gnadau is near Magdeburg

9. Edred's son, John Varley Jeffery, has written a book about General Charles Fleetwood, with a foreword by Dame Joan Fleetwood Varley


The Bristows
The Bristows
R Dearle
R Dearle
T Tresize
T Tresize
Blake Charles
Blake Charles
Blake Girls
Blake Girls
Barnards of Epsom
Barnards of Epsom
EW Martin
EW Martin
HEM Douglas
HEM Douglas
W Bury
W Bury
Holman Hunt
Holman Hunt
Epsom Monuments
Epsom Monuments
Hale White
Hale White