The Andrews Family


Part 1 - William Andrews Senior

The family of William Andrews Senior (c.1761-1846) and Susannah Craddock (1773 -1839)


William Andrews, plasterer (or 'plaisterer' as it was in those days) and bricklayer, was born about 1761 and died in Epsom on 8 November 1846. He had settled in the town in about 1790. He married Susannah Craddock, born in 1773 in Ashtead, on 12 Feb 1795 in St Giles, Ashtead. Her father was a Londoner who became a shopkeeper in Ashtead.

William Andrews
William Andrews

In the 1841 census William, a widower (Susannah had died on 17 July 1839), was living in High Street, Epsom with three of his children, John Craddock (born about 1805), Henry (born about 1812) and Jane (born about 1817). In addition to his building activities William was caretaker of the Old Watch House. He was in partnership with his sons, John Craddock and William Chase Morrish, who, according to his will, written in 1841, received one-third of the profits between them, with their father having two-thirds, which seems fairly harsh on the sons, who probably did most of the work considering William's age. In 1834 they had been granted a licence to dig on Epsom Common for clay and brick earth for the purpose of making bricks.

In his book 'Reminiscences of Epsom' William's grandson, James, says 'My recollections carry me back a few years earlier still when the quaint old Watch House occupied the site on which (to quote Dickens) the magnificent brick clock case was afterwards erected. Many a time have I clambered into the Old Tower with my grandfather who voluntarily kept the clock wound up in the absence of any paid official. Inside the structure was a lock-up for prisoners whilst outside stood the stocks. I have even dim recollections of occasionally seeing some sturdy vagrant occupying the seat of penance, affording a moral lesson to the youth of Epsom, and at the same time ministering to their inward enjoyment.'

On William Andrews's death, John and William Junior inherited his share of the business equally, with the proviso that for the following seven years they should pay one-third of the profits to their spinster sister, Jane, and another third to their brother, James. This meant that until the end of 1853 they would be in exactly the same position as before. Henry was allowed occupation of the house for seven years and was required to buy it, which he did, but was apparently lent the money by the trustees of William Andrews's will, who were his nephew, John Chase Craddock, and William's eldest son, James. There were minor monetary bequests to relatives, all of which had to be paid out of a sum of £500 that had been borrowed by John and William. The whole will is very confusing, without knowing what had gone on before or what financial position the children were in on their own account, but the gist seemed to be that everything (including a number of copyhold cottages) had to be sold by the end of 1853 and the proceeds were then to be split equally among the surviving children.

James, the eldest child, was born in 1799. He was initially a plumber and then a master builder. In the 1830s he had gone into the plumbing and glazing business in Tring, Hertfordshire with his uncle by marriage, Thomas Knight (husband of his mother's sister, Hannah Deriah Craddock). It has been hypothesised that Mr Knight might have needed an injection of capital into his business and that one of the 'wealthy' Andrews relatives fitted the bill rather better than a Knight relative who was in the same business but didn't have the cash. In 1857 James married his first cousin, Deriah Elizabeth Ann Mary Knight (born 23 July 1806 in Tring). In the 1861 census they were living with James's unmarried siblings, Henry, John and Jane, next door to their sister-in-law, Lucy Welby Andrews, who ran the Post Office. They subsequently returned to Tring and James died suddenly on 17 September 1868 in Bath, only three months before his brother, Henry. He was buried in Epsom Cemetery. Deriah died on a visit to Derby on 5 August 1887, leaving personal estate of £4836 (about £0.5 million today). Deriah's sister, Mary Ann Knight, married Richard Butcher, an Epsom painter and glazier.

William Chase Morrish Andrews (often known as 'Morrish' and born in about 1801) lived at Epsom Common. He will feature in Part 2 of this series.

The eldest daughter, Mary Ann (born about 1803), married a Richard Andrews from Totnes, Devon on 27 December 1838 at St Martin's, Epsom. I have been unable to discover whether or not he was a relative but, if not, it is a large coincidence that they should share the same surname and meet, given that they lived so far apart. Richard was a currier (a tanner and processor of leather) and Mary Ann went to live with him in Totnes. There were no children. Mary Ann died in 1876 and Richard in 1881.

John Craddock Andrews was born about 1805 and died a bachelor on 3 August 1863. Next came Thomas, born in about 1807 (fate unknown)1 and then Susannah, who was born in 1810 and died unmarried in 1838. Henry Andrews (born in about 1812) was an architect, surveyor, estate agent and auctioneer. He died unmarried on 29 December 1868.

Advertisement for Henry Andrews
Advertisement for Henry Andrews

Eliza Andrews was born on 5 December 1814 (fate unknown)2.

Jane Andrews was born in about 1817. She never married and kept house for her bachelor brothers, John and Henry, until they both died in the 1860s. Jane received an annuity from Henry's estate and the property was mortgaged by his nephew, James Andrews (son of William Chase Morrish Andrews) to George White of Ashley House in return for a loan of £312. However, James reserved parts of the premises for Jane's use, namely the parlour, scullery and three bedrooms. The remainder seems to have been rented out (in 1891 a veterinary surgeon called Thomas Skilton was also living there with his family). Jane died on 1 September 1896 and was buried in Epsom Cemetery with her brother and her sister-in-law, William Chase Morrish and Lucy Welby Andrews. James then paid off the mortgage.

Linda Jackson © November 2011


Links to previous and next part.


Footnotes

1. and 2. As they were not named in the will of William Andrews, it is presumed that they predeceased him.


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